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Lew Tabackin

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ENTERTAINMENT
February 16, 1991 | LEONARD FEATHER
Lew Tabackin might be said to have two dual personalities: as a saxophonist and flutist, but also as the key soloist in Toshiko Akiyoshi's big band and as leader of his own trio. Wednesday evening at the Vine Street Bar & Grill he brought renewed evidence of his creative power in the intimate three-man setting, with bassist Jay Anderson and drummer Bill Goodwin as his capable partners.
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NEWS
July 24, 2003 | Don Heckman, Special to The Times
Opportunities to experience the art of jazz improvisation are rare. What one hears at most jazz performances is the craft of jazz improvisation -- its technique, its virtuosity, its entertainment. Although that offers plenty of attractions, there's something even more special in hearing jazz that moves into the heart of the mysterious process of improvisation as artistic expression. Which leads to tenor saxophonist and flutist Lew Tabackin's appearance this week at the Jazz Bakery.
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 27, 1990 | ZAN STEWART
Tabackin, in his first domestic solo album in almost a decade, reaffirms his postion as a masterful tenor saxophonist and flutist (his warm, singing tone on each instrument is immediately identifiable), and as a musician with grand taste in repertoire.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 17, 1999 | ZAN STEWART, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Rhythm sections du jour. That's what the persuasive jazz tenor saxophonist/flutist Lew Tabackin played with for many years. He'd usually tour from his New York home as a single and work with a pickup local rhythm section in clubs from Los Angeles to Paris. "Sometimes you get good guys, sometimes you get guys that can't play very well," he said. "But you always have to make adjustments. You can never relax and just play music." A couple of years ago, Tabackin said enough's enough.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 17, 1999 | BILL KOHLHAASE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
With more than a touch of irony in his voice, Lew Tabackin recalls a review of his last recording, the 3-year-old "Tenority." "The reviewer said something like, 'If Lew was 30 years younger and didn't look so professorial, he would be a marketer's dream, because he is on the cutting edge of retro-bop.' He went on to say how I always gave myself away [as not being young] because my phrasing was too good."
ENTERTAINMENT
March 25, 1999 | DON HECKMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
This week's featured act at Catalina Bar & Grill is billed as the Toshiko Akiyoshi & Lew Tabackin Quartet. In Tuesday night's opening set, however, a more apt title might simply have been the Lew Tabackin Quartet.
NEWS
July 24, 2003 | Don Heckman, Special to The Times
Opportunities to experience the art of jazz improvisation are rare. What one hears at most jazz performances is the craft of jazz improvisation -- its technique, its virtuosity, its entertainment. Although that offers plenty of attractions, there's something even more special in hearing jazz that moves into the heart of the mysterious process of improvisation as artistic expression. Which leads to tenor saxophonist and flutist Lew Tabackin's appearance this week at the Jazz Bakery.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 1, 1996 | BILL KOHLHAASE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Saxophonist Lew Tabackin casts a huge presence when he plays in front of wife Toshiko Akiyoshi's orchestra, commanding attention with a robust attack and an involved, insistent style of narrative flow. Little changes when he works with a rhythm section only, as he did Thursday at the Jazz Bakery, and the effect can be overwhelming.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 31, 1986 | A. JAMES LISKA
Clad in kimono and obi, jazz pianist Toshiko Akiyoshi once nervously "entered and signed in" on a late '50s edition of the television program "What's My Line." Though it's doubtful that today many would find her occupation any more unusual than that of anyone who makes a living playing jazz, it might be surprising to find that the Manchuria-born pianist is internationally recognized as a composer, arranger and leader of one of the finest big bands in jazz.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 17, 1999 | ZAN STEWART, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Rhythm sections du jour. That's what the persuasive jazz tenor saxophonist/flutist Lew Tabackin played with for many years. He'd usually tour from his New York home as a single and work with a pickup local rhythm section in clubs from Los Angeles to Paris. "Sometimes you get good guys, sometimes you get guys that can't play very well," he said. "But you always have to make adjustments. You can never relax and just play music." A couple of years ago, Tabackin said enough's enough.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 25, 1999 | DON HECKMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
This week's featured act at Catalina Bar & Grill is billed as the Toshiko Akiyoshi & Lew Tabackin Quartet. In Tuesday night's opening set, however, a more apt title might simply have been the Lew Tabackin Quartet.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 22, 1999 | BILL KOHLHAASE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Many of the jazz world's best artists carry on a career without help from major record labels. Case in point: saxophonist-flutist Lew Tabackin. Tabackin, who opened a three-day run at Steamers Cafe in Fullerton on Friday, is no stranger to high-profile recording companies, having released a handful of documents for Concord in this decade and, with wife Toshiko Akiyoshi's Jazz Orchestra, for Columbia in the 1980s.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 17, 1999 | BILL KOHLHAASE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
With more than a touch of irony in his voice, Lew Tabackin recalls a review of his last recording, the 3-year-old "Tenority." "The reviewer said something like, 'If Lew was 30 years younger and didn't look so professorial, he would be a marketer's dream, because he is on the cutting edge of retro-bop.' He went on to say how I always gave myself away [as not being young] because my phrasing was too good."
ENTERTAINMENT
June 1, 1996 | BILL KOHLHAASE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Saxophonist Lew Tabackin casts a huge presence when he plays in front of wife Toshiko Akiyoshi's orchestra, commanding attention with a robust attack and an involved, insistent style of narrative flow. Little changes when he works with a rhythm section only, as he did Thursday at the Jazz Bakery, and the effect can be overwhelming.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 16, 1991 | LEONARD FEATHER
Lew Tabackin might be said to have two dual personalities: as a saxophonist and flutist, but also as the key soloist in Toshiko Akiyoshi's big band and as leader of his own trio. Wednesday evening at the Vine Street Bar & Grill he brought renewed evidence of his creative power in the intimate three-man setting, with bassist Jay Anderson and drummer Bill Goodwin as his capable partners.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 9, 1991 | ZAN STEWART
Saxophonist-flutist Lew Tabackin doesn't have anything against pianos or pianists--after all, he's married to Toshiko Akiyoshi, the pianist and bandleader with whom he often performs, both with her Jazz Orchestra and in their quartet. It's just that he likes what happens when he plays without a keyboard, as he will Wednesday-Saturday at the Vine St. Bar & Grill in Hollywood, when he leads a trio featuring bassist Jay Anderson and drummer Bill Goodwin.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 9, 1991 | ZAN STEWART
Saxophonist-flutist Lew Tabackin doesn't have anything against pianos or pianists--after all, he's married to Toshiko Akiyoshi, the pianist and bandleader with whom he often performs, both with her Jazz Orchestra and in their quartet. It's just that he likes what happens when he plays without a keyboard, as he will Wednesday-Saturday at the Vine St. Bar & Grill in Hollywood, when he leads a trio featuring bassist Jay Anderson and drummer Bill Goodwin.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 9, 1986 | LEONARD FEATHER
It took quite a feat of logistics to bring together a quartet that played Sunday at the New Otani Hotel. From Minneapolis, Lew Tabackin came to town with his tenor saxophone and flute, while his wife Toshiko Akiyoshi flew in from Honolulu. Their regular bassist, Jay Anderson, arrived from New York and was joined by Eddie Marshall from San Francisco, who has often played drums with Akiyoshi and Tabackin on their various small-group assignments.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 27, 1990 | ZAN STEWART
Tabackin, in his first domestic solo album in almost a decade, reaffirms his postion as a masterful tenor saxophonist and flutist (his warm, singing tone on each instrument is immediately identifiable), and as a musician with grand taste in repertoire.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 10, 1989 | ZAN STEWART
Jazz Mobile West, a series of 15 free jazz concerts to be held at locations in the greater Los Angeles area, kicks off with a noon bash on May 19, at the Rotunda of Los Angeles City Hall. Modeled after the original Jazz Mobile, formed in New York in 1965, Jazz Mobile West is presented by the Los Angeles Jazz Society, with help from grants from the City of Los Angeles and the Music Performance Trust Fund, Local 47. Jazz Mobile West will feature performances by trumpeter Al Aarons, saxman Herman Riley, pianist Gildo Mahones, bassist Allan Jackson, and drummer Kenny Dennis.
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