Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsLewis
IN THE NEWS

Lewis

FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
April 16, 2013 | By Randy Lewis
After former British Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher was pilloried following her death last week with a campaign in England to vault the song “Ding Dong the Witch Is Dead” to the top of the nation's pop chart, an English satirist is using the occasion of Thatcher's funeral on Wednesday, April 17, to reissue a 1979 album skewering the woman also known as “The Iron Lady.” British humorist, music and comedy producer Martin Lewis says he...
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
April 23, 2014 | By Jessica Gelt
Grammy-winning rap duo Macklemore & Ryan Lewis is known for its humanitarian approach to rap. Foregoing stereotypical lyrics glamorizing violence and disdain for women, the duo has carved an all-inclusive niche for itself in the tough landscape of hip-hop. Wednesday morning, Ryan Lewis furthered that loving image by appearing with his mother on "CBS This Morning" to discuss her 30-year battle with HIV. He also talked about the family's 30/30 Project, which supports the cause of making HIV treatment available in disadvantaged communities around the world.
Advertisement
NATIONAL
August 28, 2013 | By Alexei Koseff, This post has been updated. See below for details.
WASHINGTON -- Rep. John Lewis (D-Ga.), the veteran civil rights activist, urged the country to remember and build on the progress of the last five decades during a speech at the 50th anniversary celebration of the March on Washington. "Sometimes I hear people saying, 'Nothing has changed,' " Lewis said. "Come and walk in my shoes. " Lewis, who was the youngest speaker at the original 1963 event, grew up in the cotton fields of Alabama and has served in Congress for more than 25 years.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 15, 2014 | By Hector Tobar
There's something delightfully strange and counterintuitive about the way time operates in the opening chapters of Michael Lewis' new book, "Flash Boys: A Wall Street Revolt. " Lewis describes a new kind of Wall Street gold rush. In the entirely automated, pre- and post-crash stock market of the first two decades of the 21st century, human traders have become superfluous. Stocks are bought and sold inside computers, and a new brand of high-frequency trader is making a fortune thanks to a precious new commodity - speed.
MAGAZINE
March 13, 2005
Finally Jerry Lewis is being recognized for his achievements and prodigious talent ("An Open Letter to the Academy," by David Weddle, Feb. 27). He's an original American clown whose movies have entertained the world; an innovative filmmaker whose techniques have influenced various directors; a tireless humanitarian who has raised more than $1 billion for charity. Does he deserve an Oscar? He deserves three! Hiram Kasten Los Angeles
NATIONAL
December 4, 2010 | By Richard Simon, Los Angeles Times
After four years, federal authorities in Los Angeles have dropped an investigation of Rep. Jerry Lewis (R-Redlands), who came under scrutiny for his ties to lobbyists whose clients received millions of dollars in congressional earmarks. "This office recently informed attorneys for Mr. Lewis that we were closing a criminal investigation," Thom Mrozek, a spokesman for the U.S. attorney in Los Angeles, said in an e-mail. He declined to comment further. Lewis said that the Justice Department statement "confirms what I've known from day one ?
ENTERTAINMENT
January 5, 2013 | By Chris Jones
"If the whole universe had no meaning," C.S. Lewis once wrote, "we should never have found out that it had no meaning. " Pithy observations like that - rooted in logical argument - have made the writer one Christian whom many agnostics and atheists accept and enjoy. "Religion is comparable to a childhood neurosis," Sigmund Freud once wrote. "Mankind will surmount this neurotic phase, just as so many children grow out of their similar neurosis. " A pithy observation like that is one reason many people are stimulated by Freud's writing, even if they regard his psychology as dated, oversexualized nonsense.
NEWS
May 10, 1989 | From Times wire services
A Superior Court judge today ordered Republican Assemblyman John R. Lewis of Orange to stand trial Sept. 25 on charges of forging former President Ronald Reagan's name on campaign endorsement letters mailed to California voters in 1986. Lewis, who was indicted Feb. 6 by the Sacramento County Grand Jury, waived his right to a preliminary examination before trial. His attorney, Clyde M. Blackmon, said Lewis decided to proceed directly to trial because the "prospects were not good" of a judge's dismissing the case at a preliminary hearing.
NEWS
May 11, 1989
A Sacramento Superior Court judge ordered Republican Assemblyman John R. Lewis of Orange to stand trial Sept. 25 on charges of forging former President Ronald Reagan's name on campaign endorsement letters mailed to California voters in 1986. Lewis, who was indicted Feb. 6 by the Sacramento County Grand Jury, waived his right to a preliminary hearing before trial. Lewis' lawyer, Clyde M. Blackmon, and the deputy attorney general prosecuting the case had tentatively agreed to start the trial Sept.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 10, 2005
THE smug condescension of reviewer Carina Chocano toward the C.S. Lewis allegory of the Christ story, in her review of the movie "The Chronicles of Narnia: The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe" ["Keeper of the Magic," Dec. 7], reveals either ignorance of the basics of any religion or willful arrogance toward those unfortunates still living in the backward caves of their Christian faith. Saying that the Lewis classic is a "primer on morality and the myths we create to explain it," then later that Lewis' intent was to portray Christ as a "way to make the world safe for Santa Claus" is to ignore not only what Lewis was doing but what the theological giants understood redemption in the Christian tradition to be. Perhaps someone more respectful of the depth and power of Christianity could have reviewed this movie.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 10, 2014 | By Hector Tobar
Sony Pictures is close to a deal with bestselling author Michael Lewis to bring his latest book, a Wall Street drama and detective story, to the silver screen. “Flash Boys: A Wall Street Revolt,” recounts how a group of misfit stock brokers and techies worked to expose, and then fight back, against the tactics of high-frequency traders, or HFTs. The HFTs were able to exploit computer technology and millisecond advantages to make huge profits at the expense of regular investors.
SPORTS
April 8, 2014 | By Lisa Dillman
CALGARY, Canada  - The numbers are quite close to his point total two years ago, then considered a downward trend for a big-name center. At least there was a tangible reason for the Kings' center Mike Richards' recording 44 points in 74 games in 2011-12. He missed most of December of that season because of a concussion, probably came back too quickly and didn't really find his form until he dominated the likes of the Vancouver Canucks' Ryan Kesler in the opening round of the playoffs.
BUSINESS
April 2, 2014 | By Walter Hamilton
At a time when public trust in Wall Street already is at a low, new allegations about high-speed stock trading threaten to further erode confidence in the financial markets. The furor centers on accusations that professional traders armed with ultra-fast computers have rigged the stock market. High-speed firms engage in what critics say amounts to insider trading, using super-charged systems to decipher trading patterns. Criticism of high-frequency trading has long swirled in financial circles, and multiple regulators are conducting investigations.
SPORTS
March 17, 2014 | By Eric Sondheimer
 In trying to put together a short list of the best high school basketball players in Southern California history over the weekend, certainly Raymond Lewis from Los Angeles Verbum Dei deserves to be mentioned, as pointed out by several readers. Here's the link to a story about his accomplishments. Eric.sondheimer@latimes.com  
SPORTS
March 12, 2014 | By Eric Sondheimer
 Observers already agree that the baseball class of 2017 is outstanding, and add the name of freshman outfielder Brandon Lewis of La Canada St. Francis to the expanding list of top first-year players. Lewis is four for seven in his brief varsity career. He's 6 feet 1 and looks the part of a future star. Eric.sondheimer@latimes.com  
SPORTS
March 9, 2014 | By Lisa Dillman
EDMONTON, Canada - Goalie Ben Scrivens knew he would have to worry about the usual suspects among his former Kings teammates. Of course, there was leading scorer Jeff Carter and the two-way brilliance of center Anze Kopitar. Then there was the man who came to dinner: Kings defenseman Alec Martinez. Martinez put the Kings ahead for good in their 4-2 victory against the Edmonton Oilers on Sunday night at Rexall Place. Carter scored twice, his 23rd and 24th goals of the season. His first goal went off the left skate of Edmonton defenseman Philip Larsen, just 1 minute 36 seconds into the game, and Carter's other goal glanced off his own skate, giving the Kings a 3-1 lead at 10:16 of the second period.
BUSINESS
June 27, 1985 | Associated Press
Petro-Lewis Corp., once the nation's leader in oil income-fund sales, has announced the sale of another $38.35 million in oil and gas properties, bringing to about $950 million the total holdings sold by the Denver-based company in the past year. Petro-Lewis said that it sold properties in Oklahoma and Arkansas to Consolidated Oil & Gas Inc., an independent Denver oil firm, for about $17.25 million in cash and securities. The sale is subject to approval by the boards of both companies.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 15, 2009
ENTERTAINMENT
February 18, 2014 | By Carolyn Kellogg, This post has been corrected, as indicated below.
If Charles Dodgson could have seen into the future, we might never have had "Alice's Adventures in Wonderland. " Dodgson, of course, was the mathematician who penned the books "Alice's Adventures in Wonderland" and "Through the Looking Glass," using the pseudonym Lewis Carroll. During his lifetime,  his identity as the "Alice in Wonderland" author had become known -- although he would have preferred it hadn't. "All that sort of publicity leads to strangers hearing of my real name in connection with the books, and to my being pointed out to, and stared at, by strangers , and treated as a 'lion,' " Dodgson wrote in a previously unpublished letter.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 18, 2014 | By Elaine Woo
When Lewis Yablonsky was growing up in New Jersey in the 1930s, he was beaten by poor whites for being Jewish and by black gangs for being white. He committed petty thefts, ran crooked card games and carried a switchblade for protection. Some of his closest friends wound up behind bars. "I wasn't sure where I belonged," he told The Times years later. "But when my best friend went to prison for hijacking a fur truck … I realized I had to get on one side of the law or the other. " Yablonsky chose the straight path, using his rough-and-tumble youth as a springboard to a distinguished career: He became the "Sociologist With Street Smarts," as one headline described him, an authority on youth gangs, hippies and drug addicts whose personal experiences gave him insights other scholars lacked.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|