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July 23, 1989
Costa Rica has barred former White House aide Oliver L. North and former U.S. National Security Adviser John M. Poindexter from entering its territory after a yearlong parliamentary probe into arms and drugs smuggling, Information Minister Jorge Urbina said in San Jose, the nation's capital. Also banned from the country were ex-U.S. Ambassador Lewis A. Tambs, arms dealer Richard V. Secord and former CIA Costa Rica station chief Joseph F. Fernandez, Urbina said.
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NEWS
July 23, 1989
Costa Rica has barred former White House aide Oliver L. North and former U.S. National Security Adviser John M. Poindexter from entering its territory after a yearlong parliamentary probe into arms and drugs smuggling, Information Minister Jorge Urbina said in San Jose, the nation's capital. Also banned from the country were ex-U.S. Ambassador Lewis A. Tambs, arms dealer Richard V. Secord and former CIA Costa Rica station chief Joseph F. Fernandez, Urbina said.
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NEWS
May 29, 1987 | From Times Staff Writers
Following are excerpts from testimony Thursday before the congressional committees that are investigating the Iran-contra affair: (Sen. George J. Mitchell (D-Me.) questioned retired CIA agent Felix Rodriguez about meetings in Washington with Donald P. Gregg, the national security adviser to Vice President George Bush.
NEWS
May 29, 1987 | From Times Staff Writers
Following are excerpts from testimony Thursday before the congressional committees that are investigating the Iran-contra affair: (Sen. George J. Mitchell (D-Me.) questioned retired CIA agent Felix Rodriguez about meetings in Washington with Donald P. Gregg, the national security adviser to Vice President George Bush.
NEWS
May 20, 1987 | SARA FRITZ, Times Staff Writer
U.S. Ambassador Lewis Tambs and at least two CIA officials in Central America assisted private efforts to equip the Nicaraguan resistance with weapons at a time when the U.S. government was strictly prohibited by Congress from providing military aid, a key operative in the supply network testified Tuesday. Robert W. Owen, who served as a go-between with the rebels for then-White House aide Oliver L.
NEWS
February 21, 1985
Lewis A. Tambs, U.S. ambassador to Colombia, said individuals suspected of being drug traffickers tried to bribe U.S. Embassy guards to assassinate him. Tambs, 57, who is apparently being assigned to another diplomatic post, told a television station in Bogota that presumed drug traffickers planned to kill him because he defended an extradition treaty that has sent four Colombians to the United States for trial on drug-related charges.
NEWS
April 18, 1986 | Associated Press
A bomb exploded in front of the U.S. Consulate in the Costa Rican capital Thursday night, injuring three people, authorities said. Police said three people, including a Panamanian, were detained in connection with the 9 p.m. blast. They were not identified. The three injured, believed to be passers-by, were taken to San Juan Adios Hospital. Their conditions were not immediately known.
NEWS
May 29, 1987 | Associated Press
The congressional Iran- contra committees questioned former CIA Costa Rica station chief Joe Fernandez in closely guarded secrecy today on his role in aiding Nicaraguan rebels during a two-year ban on U.S. government military assistance. One committee member, Rep. Henry J. Hyde ( R-Ill.) said Fernandez generally confirmed testimony by former Ambassador Lewis A. Tambs on Thursday that officials in Washington ordered assistance for the contra rebels during the congressional ban.
NEWS
March 27, 1987 | DOYLE McMANUS, Times Staff Writer
Edwin G. Corr, U.S. ambassador to El Salvador, met several times with then-White House aide Oliver L. North last year when North was directing the Nicaraguan rebels' secret airlift operation at a Salvadoran air force base, State Department officials said Thursday. However, Corr has told colleagues that he and North discussed only the delivery of non-military aid to the contras, not weaponry, the officials said.
NEWS
April 22, 1987 | MARJORIE MILLER, Times Staff Writer
U.S. Ambassador to Pakistan Deane R. Hinton, who was head of the American mission in El Salvador during some of the most turbulent years there, has been chosen by the Reagan Administration as the new ambassador to Costa Rica, according to U.S. sources in Washington and Central America. If confirmed by Congress, Hinton will take over the post at a time when relations between the United States and Costa Rica are strained over the U.S.
NEWS
May 20, 1987 | SARA FRITZ, Times Staff Writer
U.S. Ambassador Lewis Tambs and at least two CIA officials in Central America assisted private efforts to equip the Nicaraguan resistance with weapons at a time when the U.S. government was strictly prohibited by Congress from providing military aid, a key operative in the supply network testified Tuesday. Robert W. Owen, who served as a go-between with the rebels for then-White House aide Oliver L.
NEWS
June 3, 1987 | From Times Wire Services
Iranian-born businessman Albert Hakim told Congress today he set up a $200,000 secret Swiss bank account for the benefit of Lt. Col. Oliver L. North's family in case anything happened to him in the Iran- contra affair. Hakim said the account for North was set up about the same time North and former National Security Adviser Robert C. McFarlane went to Tehran to discuss arms deals and the release of American hostages in Lebanon.
NEWS
March 17, 1988 | MICHAEL WINES, Times Staff Writer
The 101-page indictment of four key figures in the Iran-Contra affair handed up Wednesday contains signposts pointing to other investigations and perhaps other criminal charges by the federal grand jury operating under independent counsel Lawrence E. Walsh. Walsh said as much Wednesday, describing the indictment as an "interim report" by the grand jury, though he declined to predict further indictments.
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