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Lewis And Clark National Historical Park

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NATIONAL
October 21, 2005 | From Times Wire Reports
The fire that destroyed a replica of Ft. Clatsop at the Lewis and Clark National Historical Park this month was started accidentally by a fire burning on a hearth in one of the barracks, the park's superintendent said. The 50-year-old replica near Warrenton on the north Oregon coast was the centerpiece of the park. It commemorated the western terminus of the Voyage of Discovery led by Meriwether Lewis and William Clark from 1804 to 1806.
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NATIONAL
October 21, 2005 | From Times Wire Reports
The fire that destroyed a replica of Ft. Clatsop at the Lewis and Clark National Historical Park this month was started accidentally by a fire burning on a hearth in one of the barracks, the park's superintendent said. The 50-year-old replica near Warrenton on the north Oregon coast was the centerpiece of the park. It commemorated the western terminus of the Voyage of Discovery led by Meriwether Lewis and William Clark from 1804 to 1806.
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NEWS
November 16, 2004 | Ashley Powers
LEWIS and Clark probably wanted to forget Dismal Nitch. But one of their worst stops will live on, thanks to a new national historical park. The new Lewis and Clark National Historical Park, which pieces together territory from the explorers' Washington and Oregon excursions, was dedicated last week as the country's 120th historic site, coinciding with the bicentennial of the duo's expedition to the Northwest.
NEWS
November 16, 2004 | Ashley Powers
LEWIS and Clark probably wanted to forget Dismal Nitch. But one of their worst stops will live on, thanks to a new national historical park. The new Lewis and Clark National Historical Park, which pieces together territory from the explorers' Washington and Oregon excursions, was dedicated last week as the country's 120th historic site, coinciding with the bicentennial of the duo's expedition to the Northwest.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 16, 2008 | Joe Mozingo and Andrew Blankstein, Times Staff Writers
The bronze miner who stood for 80 years in a Mid-City park suffered the height of indignities. He was ripped from his pedestal in the park two blocks from Beverly Hills, cut in half above the knees and trucked to a scrap yard on Alameda Street south of downtown. There he was thrown amid the lumpen metal masses -- common copper plumbing, old radiators, transmissions and beer kegs. Fortunately, police found the miner before he was crushed in the bailer, sent to China and melted in a foundry forge.
NATIONAL
October 23, 2005 | Lynn Marshall, Times Staff Writer
In late fall, 200 years ago, Meriwether Lewis and William Clark had at long last reached the Pacific Coast, but found themselves in a cold, rain-soaked forest facing the onset of an even wetter and colder winter. To protect themselves from the elements, Lewis and Clark and the men of the Corps of Discovery built a log fort -- the site of which would go on to become a national memorial and a central part of the region's identity. When a replica of Ft.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 13, 2008 | Joe Mozingo, Times Staff Writer
The green patina gave the bronze statue of a gold miner a sense of antiquity, speaking to its 80 years of service in a small park in Mid-City Los Angeles. And then last week, a 22-month-old boy on his way home from day care noticed something awry in his daily routine. "No, no, no," he said from the back seat. His mother, Clara Magyar, turned to look. The 7-foot miner was gone.
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