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Lewis Burns

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NEWS
October 7, 2004 | Victoria Looseleaf
Lewis Burns could very well be the Leo Fender of the didgeridoo. An Aborigine from the Wiradjuri tribe who lives in the Australian outback and frequently visits the U.S., Burns has been handcrafting the instrument known for its haunting sound and purported healing qualities for 20 years. And not just for himself. Indeed, Burns, who was given a didgeridoo when he was 13, has taught more than 1,000 people how to make this ancient Aussie instrument.
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NEWS
October 7, 2004 | Victoria Looseleaf
Lewis Burns could very well be the Leo Fender of the didgeridoo. An Aborigine from the Wiradjuri tribe who lives in the Australian outback and frequently visits the U.S., Burns has been handcrafting the instrument known for its haunting sound and purported healing qualities for 20 years. And not just for himself. Indeed, Burns, who was given a didgeridoo when he was 13, has taught more than 1,000 people how to make this ancient Aussie instrument.
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SPORTS
August 22, 1992
There have been some great comedy teams on television--Dean Martin and Jerry Lewis, George Burns and Gracie Allen, Chris Schenkel and Nelson Burton Jr. None of these were as funny as Chick Hearn and Al LoCasale were on the Ram-Raider telecast. I sure hope they are paired again because that was really funny stuff. CHUCK HILL Van Nuys
ENTERTAINMENT
March 17, 2004 | Victoria Looseleaf, Special to The Times
It's been called the Woodstock of the didgeridoo: a thousand people camping out in Joshua Tree for a weekend in October, some blowing on the ancient Aboriginal instrument, others dancing ecstatically to its otherworldly sounds. Still others learn to make a didgeridoo from a eucalyptus sapling. Didgeridoo Festival 2003 was where theater director Simon Levy met Lewis Burns, a descendant of the Wiradjuri tribe in Australia's New South Wales, and Venice Beach-based "didge" player Andjru Werderitsch.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 11, 1991 | DAVE LESHER, TIMES POLITICAL WRITER
It's no wonder that eight Republicans jumped at the chance last March to replace former Anaheim state Sen. John Seymour: The 35th Senate District, which Seymour recently vacated, is the most solidly Republican Senate district in all of California. There are more than twice as many Republicans in this one Senate district as there are in all of San Francisco County, according to the latest registration report from Secretary of State March Fong Eu. So, since Assemblyman John R.
SPORTS
October 14, 1994 | From Staff and Wire Reports
Bob Estes, yet to win in seven seasons on the PGA Tour, birdied the last hole for a nine-under 62 Thursday and one-stroke lead after one round of the $1-million Texas Open in San Antonio. Estes hit a five-iron to within three feet for the closing birdie that broke a tie with Bob Tway. At 65 were J.L. Lewis, Bob Burns, rookie Steve Rintoul, Steve Stricker and Brian Kamm. Paul Azinger, however, withdrew after his back problems failed to respond to treatment.
SPORTS
May 24, 1998 | JIM MURRAY
Well, I see where the Lakers are being double-teamed to death again. It comes as no surprise to this writer. They are being mugged by the Odd Couple. You know, throughout history, efficiency comes in tandems. There have been dynamic duos all through the ages. Think about it. Laurel and Hardy, Martin and Lewis, George Burns and Gracie Allen. The theater had Lunt and Fontanne, the old West the Lone Ranger and Tonto. Sports is no exception. You had Ruth and Gehrig, Montana and Rice, Mr.
SPORTS
February 17, 1991 | MIKE LITTWIN, BALTIMORE SUN
Even if Gary Williams goes to sleep each night and dreams fondly of days at Ohio State, he still wakes up each morning at Maryland. And the wonder is, he can smile about it. All Ohio State could do is maybe win a national championship (if Vegas opts for the NBA by March), while Maryland -- no lights, no cameras, no tournament action -- is in the business of producing minor miracles. Take the Georgia Tech game of Wednesday night as a small example. Forget the upset win.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 12, 1985 | SYLVIE DRAKE, Times Theater Writer
Imagine a roomful of theater critics babbling in a dozen languages with a handful of simultaneous translators trying to keep up. You might think Judgment Day had arrived. Artists, at the very least, could find such a congregation intimidating. Yet the playwrights and actors invited to address the recent five-day Ninth International Congress of Theatre Critics here seemed to welcome the opportunity on a variety of levels. A chance to carp back at the carpers? That never materialized.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 16, 1996 | SUSAN KING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
How has George Burns touched Hollywood? Let them count the ways: Milton Berle: I have known him since 1918 or 1917, when he was floundering around in vaudeville like I was. He was a little older, of course. He tells the truth. There is nothing stronger than the truth if it is witty and funny and it is real and it is honest. He told real facts, but his delivery was so wonderful and his style and his point of view that it worked very well for him.
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