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Lewis Segal

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NEWS
April 20, 2006
Question: When doing a dance review, do you separate the quality of the performers from the accompanying music? Can you love the dance and hate the music? * Segal: Actually, we're far more likely to love the music and hate the dance than the other way around.
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 20, 2008
ONCE again, I thank Lewis Segal for bringing attention to the art of dance ["An Art of Stolen Glances," Jan. 6]. As a student and teacher of Labanotation [the notational system used for analyzing and recording human movement], I know too well how video has permeated the recording of dance for future generations. I have always wondered how bootlegging, pirating and plagiarism come into play with the performing art that is always least recognized yet most independent of any other medium.
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 20, 2008
ONCE again, I thank Lewis Segal for bringing attention to the art of dance ["An Art of Stolen Glances," Jan. 6]. As a student and teacher of Labanotation [the notational system used for analyzing and recording human movement], I know too well how video has permeated the recording of dance for future generations. I have always wondered how bootlegging, pirating and plagiarism come into play with the performing art that is always least recognized yet most independent of any other medium.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 20, 2006
I was totally thrilled by Lewis Segal's boldness and accurate frankness about a ballet world I have experienced for nearly 25 years ["Five Things I Hate About Ballet," Aug. 6]. It is an amazing feeling to read one's own feelings and opinions through someone else's words. Thank you for that. I am French-born, trained in the Paris Opera Ballet school and have traveled abroad for 10 years in order to follow the career I wished to have. It is the first time I have found someone who dares to say the things he has. Journalists do not have that kind of freedom of speech here [in France]
ENTERTAINMENT
January 17, 1998
I especially enjoyed reading Lewis Segal's article on Arthur Mitchell ("A Dance of Survival," Jan. 8). Mitchell is an influential pioneer of the dance art form who has and is continually paving the way for new and up-and-coming artists to reveal their creativity and truth. Absolutely, he deserves this profile. I am so looking forward to the day when the Los Angeles dance community will flourish like the mecca of dance in New York. This precious art form is a significant and vital component to the continued growth of our society.
NEWS
January 20, 2005
Lewis Segal's comments in "Ask the Critic" (Jan. 6) helped me finally understand why movies like "Moulin Rouge" and "Chicago" drive me crazy. Those editing cuts where you see a body part here and there give me a headache, because they are disguising the fact that the person belonging to the body part can't dance worth a dime. I remember Patrick Swayze, a trained dancer, performing Latin dancing in "Dirty Dancing." He was magnificent but he was paired with Jennifer Grey, who had two left feet from the beginning to the end. Somewhere out there, there has to be a producer or director who can put together a movie that has real, live, talented dancers -- a movie made without a thousand cuts.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 20, 2002
Lewis Segal does seem to have a nasty streak ("Stars Salvage ABT's 'Corsaire,' " July 13). He seems negative about most dance in general and American Ballet Theatre and Kevin McKenzie in particular. It's no wonder L.A. doesn't have a resident (or semi-resident) ballet company, having to face a reviewer as negative as he. I do not believe that in this day and age "Le Corsaire" is presented for any other reason than to thrill the audience with bravura dancing. Political over- or undertones aren't a factor.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 9, 1995
Lewis Segal's bilious review of "Dances and Music of the Iranian World" (Calendar, Nov. 20) leads me to wonder if I attended the same Avaz performance. What I experienced at the Wilshire Boulevard Temple presentation was something totally different than that conveyed by the reviewer. Anthony Shay, the founder-director of Avaz, deserves high praise for his prodigious efforts in presenting and preserving the Iranian regional folk dances, which have been banned in their native land. Segal's remark, "Shay gave himself showcases galore," was downright mean-spirited.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 21, 2004
What purpose does a bitterly sarcastic critique of a local professional dance company serve? ["Choreography Steps Over Its Own Feelings" by Lewis Segal, Aug. 9.] Just the day before, Segal wrote of the [dwindling] funding of arts in Los Angeles and its effect on the dance community. In his very next article, he personally attacked the artistic sensibilities of choreographer-dancer Regina Klenjoski, a longtime contributor to the L.A. dance community. Not only has Klenjoski sustained a company since 1999 (now regularly employing six dancers)
ENTERTAINMENT
August 20, 2006
I was totally thrilled by Lewis Segal's boldness and accurate frankness about a ballet world I have experienced for nearly 25 years ["Five Things I Hate About Ballet," Aug. 6]. It is an amazing feeling to read one's own feelings and opinions through someone else's words. Thank you for that. I am French-born, trained in the Paris Opera Ballet school and have traveled abroad for 10 years in order to follow the career I wished to have. It is the first time I have found someone who dares to say the things he has. Journalists do not have that kind of freedom of speech here [in France]
NEWS
April 20, 2006
Question: When doing a dance review, do you separate the quality of the performers from the accompanying music? Can you love the dance and hate the music? * Segal: Actually, we're far more likely to love the music and hate the dance than the other way around.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 7, 2005
Many thanks to Lewis Segal for his review of American Ballet Theatre ["What's Their Pointe?" April 30]. I hope ABT reads it and takes it to heart. The only thing I would add -- not facetiously -- is that ABT might consider changing its name, as the preponderance of principals and soloists are now from other countries. And among the corps de ballet, which certainly is formed mainly of American dancers, there are several who have received at least some of their training in other countries.
NEWS
January 20, 2005
Lewis Segal's comments in "Ask the Critic" (Jan. 6) helped me finally understand why movies like "Moulin Rouge" and "Chicago" drive me crazy. Those editing cuts where you see a body part here and there give me a headache, because they are disguising the fact that the person belonging to the body part can't dance worth a dime. I remember Patrick Swayze, a trained dancer, performing Latin dancing in "Dirty Dancing." He was magnificent but he was paired with Jennifer Grey, who had two left feet from the beginning to the end. Somewhere out there, there has to be a producer or director who can put together a movie that has real, live, talented dancers -- a movie made without a thousand cuts.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 21, 2004
What purpose does a bitterly sarcastic critique of a local professional dance company serve? ["Choreography Steps Over Its Own Feelings" by Lewis Segal, Aug. 9.] Just the day before, Segal wrote of the [dwindling] funding of arts in Los Angeles and its effect on the dance community. In his very next article, he personally attacked the artistic sensibilities of choreographer-dancer Regina Klenjoski, a longtime contributor to the L.A. dance community. Not only has Klenjoski sustained a company since 1999 (now regularly employing six dancers)
ENTERTAINMENT
July 20, 2002
Lewis Segal does seem to have a nasty streak ("Stars Salvage ABT's 'Corsaire,' " July 13). He seems negative about most dance in general and American Ballet Theatre and Kevin McKenzie in particular. It's no wonder L.A. doesn't have a resident (or semi-resident) ballet company, having to face a reviewer as negative as he. I do not believe that in this day and age "Le Corsaire" is presented for any other reason than to thrill the audience with bravura dancing. Political over- or undertones aren't a factor.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 22, 1998
As co-producer, choreographer and performer of the highly successful "Men: Dancing" at the John Anson Ford Amphitheatre, I am compelled to respond to the unfavorable review Lewis Segal wrote ("It's a Man's World as Choreographers Define the Gender," Aug. 17). I consider it highly unfair that he compared "Men: Dancing" with "Men of Distinction," which was performed at Occidental College. He drew comparisons between the two in an attempt to pit one show against the other. Not only does he ridicule the production but he takes a punch at our enthusiastic audience.
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