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Lex Luthor

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NEWS
July 6, 2012 | By Brady MacDonald, Los Angeles Times staff writer
My palms have been sweating for weeks in anticipation of Lex Luthor: Drop of Doom , the new drop tower debuting Saturday at Six Flags Magic Mountain. > Photos: Lex Luthor drop tower at Six Flags Magic Mountain My apprehension stemmed not from the thrill ride's record-setting 400-foot height or 85 mph speed, but rather from the drop tower's relative proximity to the Superman: Escape from Krypton shuttle coaster. You see, the Lex Luthor drop tower is attached to both sides of the 415-foot-tall Superman L-shaped track, adding to the excitement of both rides.
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 16, 2014 | By Robert Abele
Cloying and smug when it's not being unfunny and crass, the high school reunion comedy "Back in the Day" hits lows with a frequency that suggests a world-class sharp shooter or free-throw king. With every thudding gross-out gag or mistimed bit of sentimentality, writer-director-star Michael Rosenbaum's movie acts as if it deserves a high-five. Instead, this aggressively clichéd tale of Jim (Rosenbaum), a struggling Hollywood actor attending his Midwestern high school reunion, is about as entertaining as watching two guys vomit simultaneously, to name one of the movie's prouder moments of dreary raunch.
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NEWS
September 1, 2011 | By Brady MacDonald, Los Angeles Times Staff Writer
Six Flags Magic Mountain will add a new 40-story thrill ride on June 30 themed to DC Comics villain Lex Luthor that will rank as the world's tallest and fastest drop tower. > Photos: New attractions coming to Six Flags parks in 2012 The 400-foot-tall Lex Luthor: Drop of Doom will be attached to both sides of the Valencia amusement park's 415-foot-tall Superman: Escape from Krypton coaster tower. After ascending to the top of the new drop tower, Lex Luthor riders will freefall for five seconds at speeds reaching 85 miles per hour before a magnetic braking system stops the drop.
NEWS
December 12, 2013 | By Brady MacDonald
A new era of towering thrill rides debuting over the next few years promises to alter the skylines of theme parks around the world. Photos: New towering thrill rides on the horizon Free-fall drop towers and skyrocketing space shots have been part of the theme park landscape for decades, but the next generation of sky-scraping attractions will significantly ramp up pulse rates while reaching once unimagined heights. Not too long ago, 300 feet was considered tall in the theme park universe.
NEWS
December 7, 2011 | By Brady MacDonald, Los Angeles Times staff writer
While all eyes will be on Disney California Adventure in 2012, plenty of other theme parks in California will be adding new rides and attractions in time for the summer crowds. Our Top 10 for 2012 is dominated by new rides coming to DCA's 12-acre Cars Land expansion , the grand finale in the $1 billion extreme makeover the Anaheim theme park has undertaken during the past five years. DCA's transformation is so massive that even Disneyland is taking the year off as far as new attractions go, letting the spotlight shine on its younger neighbor.
NEWS
April 10, 1994 | SUSAN KING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The guard behind the desk at ABC's offices in Century City stares intently at the man standing in front of him. A look of recognition flashes across the keeper of the gate's face as he picks up the phone to call a network rep. "The gentleman from 'Superman' is here to see you," he tells her. The man, dressed entirely in black, smiles at the guard. "My name is John Shea. And I'm no gentleman."
ENTERTAINMENT
August 15, 1988 | JOHN VOLAND and STEVE WEINSTEIN, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Look, up in the sky! If it's not a bird, a plane or Superman, it's probably John Haymes Newton, the revealed identity of Viacom's Boy of Steel in "Superboy," a half-hour syndicated series that is set to premiere Oct. 3. Newton, 22, who can still be seen in Levi's 501 commercials, will play Clark Kent as a 19-year-old journalism student at fictional Shuster University, battling the problems that accompany secret powers and, of course, Lex Luthor.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 16, 2014 | By Robert Abele
Cloying and smug when it's not being unfunny and crass, the high school reunion comedy "Back in the Day" hits lows with a frequency that suggests a world-class sharp shooter or free-throw king. With every thudding gross-out gag or mistimed bit of sentimentality, writer-director-star Michael Rosenbaum's movie acts as if it deserves a high-five. Instead, this aggressively clichéd tale of Jim (Rosenbaum), a struggling Hollywood actor attending his Midwestern high school reunion, is about as entertaining as watching two guys vomit simultaneously, to name one of the movie's prouder moments of dreary raunch.
NEWS
December 12, 2013 | By Brady MacDonald
A new era of towering thrill rides debuting over the next few years promises to alter the skylines of theme parks around the world. Photos: New towering thrill rides on the horizon Free-fall drop towers and skyrocketing space shots have been part of the theme park landscape for decades, but the next generation of sky-scraping attractions will significantly ramp up pulse rates while reaching once unimagined heights. Not too long ago, 300 feet was considered tall in the theme park universe.
BUSINESS
June 5, 1989 | From Associated Press
Move over, Donald J. Trump. Step aside, Frank Lorenzo. Lex Luthor, the cunning comic book villain and archenemy of Superman, is in the hostile takeover business and pillaging the blue chip pickings of Metropolis. Lately, the baldheaded billionaire bad guy has schemed to acquire Scientific & Technological Advanced Research Laboratories, a rival to his LexCorp Group. Yes, the folks at D.C. Comics Inc. magazines have discovered a theme already milked by the Hollywood producers of "Wall Street" and "Working Girl"--corporate takeovers and foxy financiers make good entertainment.
NEWS
July 6, 2012 | By Brady MacDonald, Los Angeles Times staff writer
My palms have been sweating for weeks in anticipation of Lex Luthor: Drop of Doom , the new drop tower debuting Saturday at Six Flags Magic Mountain. > Photos: Lex Luthor drop tower at Six Flags Magic Mountain My apprehension stemmed not from the thrill ride's record-setting 400-foot height or 85 mph speed, but rather from the drop tower's relative proximity to the Superman: Escape from Krypton shuttle coaster. You see, the Lex Luthor drop tower is attached to both sides of the 415-foot-tall Superman L-shaped track, adding to the excitement of both rides.
NEWS
December 7, 2011 | By Brady MacDonald, Los Angeles Times staff writer
While all eyes will be on Disney California Adventure in 2012, plenty of other theme parks in California will be adding new rides and attractions in time for the summer crowds. Our Top 10 for 2012 is dominated by new rides coming to DCA's 12-acre Cars Land expansion , the grand finale in the $1 billion extreme makeover the Anaheim theme park has undertaken during the past five years. DCA's transformation is so massive that even Disneyland is taking the year off as far as new attractions go, letting the spotlight shine on its younger neighbor.
NEWS
September 1, 2011 | By Brady MacDonald, Los Angeles Times Staff Writer
Six Flags Magic Mountain will add a new 40-story thrill ride on June 30 themed to DC Comics villain Lex Luthor that will rank as the world's tallest and fastest drop tower. > Photos: New attractions coming to Six Flags parks in 2012 The 400-foot-tall Lex Luthor: Drop of Doom will be attached to both sides of the Valencia amusement park's 415-foot-tall Superman: Escape from Krypton coaster tower. After ascending to the top of the new drop tower, Lex Luthor riders will freefall for five seconds at speeds reaching 85 miles per hour before a magnetic braking system stops the drop.
NEWS
July 17, 1994 | GRAHAME L. JONES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As in all epochal battles, mythical or otherwise, there has to be a hero and there has to be a villain. But which is which? That's the difficulty facing neutral observers of today's World Cup final between Italy and Brazil at the Rose Bowl in Pasadena. For the first time in history, two three-time winners of the planet's most coveted sports trophy are squaring off in the championship match. But which team should you support? Do you take Italy, which won the World Cup in 1934, 1938 and 1982, because of its courage in the face of adversity?
NEWS
April 10, 1994 | SUSAN KING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The guard behind the desk at ABC's offices in Century City stares intently at the man standing in front of him. A look of recognition flashes across the keeper of the gate's face as he picks up the phone to call a network rep. "The gentleman from 'Superman' is here to see you," he tells her. The man, dressed entirely in black, smiles at the guard. "My name is John Shea. And I'm no gentleman."
BUSINESS
June 5, 1989 | From Associated Press
Move over, Donald J. Trump. Step aside, Frank Lorenzo. Lex Luthor, the cunning comic book villain and archenemy of Superman, is in the hostile takeover business and pillaging the blue chip pickings of Metropolis. Lately, the baldheaded billionaire bad guy has schemed to acquire Scientific & Technological Advanced Research Laboratories, a rival to his LexCorp Group. Yes, the folks at D.C. Comics Inc. magazines have discovered a theme already milked by the Hollywood producers of "Wall Street" and "Working Girl"--corporate takeovers and foxy financiers make good entertainment.
NEWS
May 6, 1986 | JENNINGS PARROTT
--Don't mess with the new Clark Kent. One of America's best-known wimps has taken a cue from "Dirty Harry" and no longer will tolerate being embarrassed in front of Lois Lane, or anyone else. "Clark Kent is going to be more aggressive--not so squeaky clean," said John Byrne, a Fairfield, Conn., cartoonist working to modernize Superman comics. Also, Superman's archenemy, Lex Luthor, will be a wealthy businessman instead of a mad scientist.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 25, 1987 | DENNIS HUNT, Times Staff Writer
The latest Superman movie, "Superman IV: The Quest for Peace," didn't really fly high at the box office but it's potentially a big rental hit. Starring Christopher Reeve as the Man of Steel and Gene Hackman as Lex Luthor, it will make its home video debut on Warner Video on Nov. 25. "Harry and the Hendersons," which plunks the legend of Bigfoot into a family comedy format, is due on MCA on Nov. 12.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 15, 1988 | JOHN VOLAND and STEVE WEINSTEIN, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Look, up in the sky! If it's not a bird, a plane or Superman, it's probably John Haymes Newton, the revealed identity of Viacom's Boy of Steel in "Superboy," a half-hour syndicated series that is set to premiere Oct. 3. Newton, 22, who can still be seen in Levi's 501 commercials, will play Clark Kent as a 19-year-old journalism student at fictional Shuster University, battling the problems that accompany secret powers and, of course, Lex Luthor.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 25, 1987 | DENNIS HUNT, Times Staff Writer
The latest Superman movie, "Superman IV: The Quest for Peace," didn't really fly high at the box office but it's potentially a big rental hit. Starring Christopher Reeve as the Man of Steel and Gene Hackman as Lex Luthor, it will make its home video debut on Warner Video on Nov. 25. "Harry and the Hendersons," which plunks the legend of Bigfoot into a family comedy format, is due on MCA on Nov. 12.
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