Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsLexecon Inc
IN THE NEWS

Lexecon Inc

FEATURED ARTICLES
BUSINESS
March 14, 1995 | From Bloomberg Business News
The Nasdaq Stock Market, showing a new resolve to fight charges of price fixing that have clouded its reputation for almost a year, hired Nobel Prize winner Merton Miller to help fend off the allegations. Miller, an economics professor at the University of Chicago, said he will review an academic study by two of his former students that suggests there may be price fixing among Nasdaq dealers. Officials at Nasdaq, the nation's second-largest stock market, were not available for comment.
ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
April 14, 1999 | DAVAN MAHARAJ and GREG MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
William S. Lerach, who has built a legal empire filing securities fraud lawsuits and collecting multimillion-dollar settlements from corporate America, on Tuesday agreed to pay $50 million to settle a suit by one of his targets. The settlement, among the largest ever agreed to by a law firm, came as a federal jury prepared to tack potential punitive damages onto a $45-million judgment issued Monday against Lerach and his firm.
Advertisement
BUSINESS
April 14, 1999 | DAVAN MAHARAJ and GREG MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
William S. Lerach, who has built a legal empire filing securities fraud lawsuits and collecting multimillion-dollar settlements from corporate America, on Tuesday agreed to pay $50 million to settle a suit by one of his targets. The settlement, among the largest ever agreed to by a law firm, came as a federal jury prepared to tack potential punitive damages onto a $45-million judgment issued Monday against Lerach and his firm.
BUSINESS
March 14, 1995 | From Bloomberg Business News
The Nasdaq Stock Market, showing a new resolve to fight charges of price fixing that have clouded its reputation for almost a year, hired Nobel Prize winner Merton Miller to help fend off the allegations. Miller, an economics professor at the University of Chicago, said he will review an academic study by two of his former students that suggests there may be price fixing among Nasdaq dealers. Officials at Nasdaq, the nation's second-largest stock market, were not available for comment.
BUSINESS
September 13, 1989 | ASSOCIATED PRESS
Securities and Exchange Commission member Charles C. Cox said Tuesday that he would leave the federal regulatory agency at the end of this month to join a consulting firm. Cox, an SEC commissioner since 1983 and a former chief economist of the agency, said in a brief letter to President Bush that his resignation would take effect Sept. 30, unless his replacement, Richard Breeden, assumes office before that date.
BUSINESS
December 10, 1996 | From Bloomberg Business News
In a blow to Universal Studios Inc., a key witness was disqualified as an expert witness in a Delaware Chancery Court trial after the judge said he dodged questions about errors in his resume. Andrew Rosenfield, president of Lexecon Inc., was to testify as an antitrust expert for Seagram Co.'s Universal Studios, which sued Viacom Inc. in a partnership dispute over USA Network. The case ended Friday after a month of testimony, and the judge could take several months to make a ruling.
BUSINESS
February 5, 1992 | JAMES S. GRANELLI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
More than a dozen defendants once involved with former Lincoln Savings & Loan owner Charles H. Keating Jr. began making their final pleas Tuesday to be released from a series of complex civil lawsuits brought on by the collapse of the Irvine thrift three years ago. U.S. District Judge Richard M. Bilby said he expects to rule by week's end on more than three dozen motions to throw out all or parts of the conspiracy, fraud and racketeering allegations against the defendants.
BUSINESS
March 4, 1998 | From Times Wire Services
Ruling in a case stemming from the costly collapse of Lincoln Savings & Loan, the U.S. Supreme Court on Tuesday made it easier to transfer complex lawsuits from one federal trial court to another. The high court said that federal judges who are assigned to hear pretrial matters in numerous related lawsuits filed nationwide cannot refuse later to send the cases back to the trial courts, then preside over the trials themselves. The unanimous decision involves Lexecon Inc.
BUSINESS
March 18, 1992 | JAMES S. GRANELLI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The accounting firm of Touche, Ross & Co. never joined Charles H. Keating Jr. and "his merry band of thieves" in conspiring to loot Lincoln Savings & Loan, a lawyer for the accounting firm told a federal court jury Tuesday. Touche, now called Deloitte & Touche, is a "scapegoat, someone to blame," for the 1989 collapse of the Irvine thrift and its parent company, American Continental Corp., John T.
BUSINESS
January 26, 2002 | MYRON LEVIN and LISA GIRION, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The high-profile law firm Milberg Weiss Bershad Hynes & Lerach confirmed Friday that it is the subject of a Los Angeles federal grand jury probe that is examining whether the firm and others paid people to serve as plaintiffs in shareholder class-action suits. Criminal defense lawyers said Friday that a wave of grand jury subpoenas issued to shareholders who had repeatedly appeared in the lawsuits had touched off a scramble for representation.
BUSINESS
April 6, 1995 | SCOT J. PALTROW, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Nasdaq on Wednesday released summaries of two studies it commissioned that seek to disprove allegations that dealers have colluded to fix the prices of Nasdaq stocks. One of the studies said it found that "the Nasdaq marketplace is highly competitive" and that trading statistics didn't support allegations of collusion. The study found evidence that competition among Nasdaq dealers is strong.
NEWS
March 31, 1992 | JAMES S. GRANELLI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The nation's largest accounting firm and second-biggest law firm Monday agreed to pay $87 million to settle fraud charges stemming from the collapse of Lincoln Savings & Loan, making it likely that small investors will eventually recover all their losses in the debacle. The out-of-court agreements call for accounting firm Ernst & Young to pay $63 million and the Cleveland-based law firm Jones, Day, Reavis & Pogue to contribute $24 million to settle the fraud and negligence charges.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|