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Lexington Scenery Props

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NEWS
January 18, 1998 | JILL LEOVY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Amid the weeds and razor wire just north of Burbank Airport lies the hidden Hollywood. Starting about 1990, aerospace jobs drained away from here like sand through a grate. Lockheed left. So did ITT, Weber Aircraft, Pacific Airmotive and countless small firms that supported them. Burbank officials calculate that 15,000 jobs were lost, a bloodletting that should have ravaged the city.
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BUSINESS
August 6, 1996 | SUSANNE GAYLE HARRIS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
At a time when movie stunt accidents are increasingly publicized, concern over behind-the-scenes safety involving construction of movie sets has quietly triggered a heated dispute between Hollywood and state labor officials. For more than 20 years, Cal/OSHA has not enforced in the movie industry a provision of the California Labor Code that requires an "activity" permit for the construction or demolition of any structure that is 36 feet or taller.
BUSINESS
December 3, 1998 | MICHAEL P. LUCAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
John Wright would like to make all the world a stage and you the star. Wright is CEO of Lexington Scenery & Props of Sun Valley, and he took over this month as president of the Burbank-based Themed Entertainment Assn., a 600-member trade group of designers and fabricators who help build theme parks as well as make shopping malls, restaurants and stores look more like theme parks.
BUSINESS
December 28, 1997 | DON LEE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It didn't take long for Asia's economic turmoil to spill into Lexington Scenery & Props, a Sun Valley creator of sets. Almost immediately, discussions on several new theme park and retail projects in Asia came to a halt, leaving Lexington in limbo over a region that accounts for 40% of its overall business. But Lexington owners John Wright and Frank Bencivengo aren't fretting.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 4, 1987 | JIM WALTERS, Walters is a Times copy editor.
Paint brush in hand, Lee Thomas stood ready to take on the next prehistoric monster. A garishly green 200-pound baby Triceratops a few feet away had already met its match; a gray-undercoated 15-foot-tall Tyrannosaurus rex awaited her. "In this light, all of these figures look a little strange," said the figure-finisher at Sequoia Creative Inc., which is creating 21 fully mechanized figures for Knott's Berry Farm's newest attraction.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 4, 1987 | JIM WALTERS, Walters is a Times copy editor.
Paint brush in hand, Lee Thomas stood ready to take on the next prehistoric monster. A garishly green 200-pound baby Triceratops a few feet away had already met its match; a gray-undercoated 15-foot-tall Tyrannosaurus rex awaited her. "In this light, all of these figures look a little strange," said the figure-finisher at Sequoia Creative Inc., which is creating 21 fully mechanized figures for Knott's Berry Farm's newest attraction.
NEWS
January 18, 1998 | JAMES BATES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Hollywood, which gave Southern California its glamorous image around the world, is rapidly moving from supporting player to star of the region's economy on the strength of exploding global demand for its movies, TV shows and new entertainment technologies.
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