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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 7, 1992
President Bush's decision to meet Chinese premier Li Peng privately in New York (front page, Feb. 1) is a mockery of the United Nations charter and the United States as a beacon for world democracy. Li Peng is everything but what the U.S. and the rest of the world stand for! Many Asian-Americans whose sentiment has been with the Republican Party are now considering voting against President Bush in the forthcoming election because of Bush's double-standard for China and his unspoken action in propping up the much-hated octogenarian rule in China.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 17, 2001
Congratulations on your Jan. 11 editorial, "A Curtain Parts on China Politics." It is educational to the American public to see that the difference between democracy and communist dictatorship is in political transitions: ours being a peaceful and lawful one and theirs violent and lethal. Someone will be eliminated every time. History is the witness. The "Tiananmen Papers" show not only the prelude to such violent political struggle, but also that Li Peng's opponents (presumably the Reformists)
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NEWS
September 7, 1989 | From Reuters
Chinese Premier Li Peng has given up two luxury Mercedes limousines for a more politically acceptable Audi, assembled in China. In an interview with the French newspaper Le Figaro published Wednesday, Li cited new moves to eradicate inequality and said he no longer uses his official Mercedes-Benz 280 sedan or the top-of-the-line Mercedes 560, which he had received as a gift. "I now use an Audi 100," Li said. "Why an Audi? Because it comes off a Chinese assembly line."
NEWS
March 16, 1998 | Associated Press
Despite an embarrassingly high number of dissenting votes, China's premier was elected today to head the national legislature. The National People's Congress also reelected President Jiang Zemin, delegates said, while Jiang's protege, Hu Jintao, was approved as vice president. Jiang is also general secretary of the Communist Party. Since most candidates for the top government posts ran unopposed, the outcomes were expected.
NEWS
November 24, 1987 | Associated Press
China today named Li Peng, a 59-year-old technocrat, as acting premier to replace Zhao Ziyang, who left the post to become head of the Communist Party. The standing committee of the National Peoples' Congress, China's legislature, followed Zhao's suggestion in appointing Li to the nation's most powerful government job, the official New China News Agency said. Li, a Soviet-trained electrical engineer, has been called a conservative who believes in Soviet-style central planning.
NEWS
September 8, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Hard-line Premier Li Peng has been dismissed as head of a key economic think tank, national radio reported in Beijing. The rubber-stamp standing committee of China's Parliament made the decision to remove Li from the post he had held since April, 1988. He was replaced by Chen Jinhua, 61, president of the China National Petrochemical Corp.
NEWS
November 13, 1990 | From Times Wire Services
Premier Li Peng met today with the first U.S. congressional delegation to visit China since the military's violent suppression of the pro-democracy movement in 1989. The U.S. Embassy refused to release any information about the delegation except to confirm that it was led by Rep. Michael G. Oxley (R-Ohio). The State Department identified the four other congressmen on the trip as Reps. Jim Ross Lightfoot (R-Iowa), John J. Rhodes III (R-Ariz.), E. Clay Shaw Jr. (R-Fla.
NEWS
November 25, 1987 | DAVID HOLLEY, Times Staff Writer
Vice Premier Li Peng was named China's acting premier Tuesday, replacing General Secretary Zhao Ziyang, who has held the post since 1980 but resigned it to concentrate on his duties as Communist Party chief. Li, 59, a Soviet-trained engineer, is generally viewed as more cautious than Zhao about some market-oriented reforms now being promoted by China's leaders. But like others in China's top leadership, Li is committed to modernization and the use of some market mechanisms to achieve his goal.
NEWS
April 4, 1992 | DAVID HOLLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
China's Parliament cast new doubt Friday on the political future of Premier Li Peng by amending a key government report to add a warning against excessive leftism. The decision to revise the report, which Li delivered last month at the opening of the annual meeting of the National People's Congress, is widely seen as an attempt by Communist Party reformers to undercut the power of Li and other hard-line leaders.
NEWS
April 26, 1990 | MICHAEL PARKS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Chinese Premier Li Peng, attempting to avoid a new ideological feud between Beijing and Moscow, said Wednesday that he believes the Soviet Union still adheres to socialism despite political and economic reforms that will end the Communist Party's monopoly on power and make market forces the motor of the country's economy. Although the Chinese Communist Party has sharply criticized President Mikhail S.
NEWS
March 5, 1998 | RONE TEMPEST, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It's easy to spot Zhu Rongji among a group of senior leaders at official functions here. Whether it's at the airport to greet a returning fellow Politburo member or at the Great Hall of the People for a banquet, he's the one who looks most uncomfortable. His body language says: This is a waste of time. Zhu, tapped as China's new premier, has no patience for the interminable banqueting and formalized protocol that characterize business and government here.
NEWS
September 10, 1997 | RONE TEMPEST, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the days leading to this week's important national meeting of the world's largest and most powerful Communist Party, rumors and political intrigue were so rampant here that editors of the People's Daily newspaper felt compelled to scold the Chinese for speculating about personnel changes in their country's leadership.
NEWS
March 26, 1997 | ELIZABETH SHOGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Vice President Al Gore on Tuesday assured Chinese Premier Li Peng that Sino-U.S. relations will not be hurt by allegations that China illegally contributed to American political campaigns in an effort to influence U.S. policy, a Clinton administration official said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 2, 1995 | KEN ELLINGWOOD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a surprise twist, the lawyer for a Taiwanese woman accused of murdering her husband's lover and the mistress' baby turned the tables on the philandering husband Tuesday by alleging in court that he was the real killer. The husband, Tseng (Jim) Peng, has remained out of reach in Asia despite the prosecution's efforts to have him testify against his wife, Li-Yun (Lisa) Peng, 45. Lisa Peng is accused of stabbing 25-year-old Ranbing (Jennifer) Ji 18 times in a jealous rage at Ji's Mission Viejo apartment, and then suffocating Ji's 5-month-old son. Defense lawyer Marshall Schulman charged that the husband fatally stabbed Ji to extricate himself from a three-year affair that had soured after she bore his child and to avoid a divorce that might have cast shame upon the Pengs' multimillion-dollar business empire.
NEWS
March 6, 1995 | Reuters
Premier Li Peng pledged Sunday to intensify China's battles against inflation and corruption, issues of "life or death" for the Communist Party. In his annual address to the National People's Congress, Li said "mistakes of governments at all levels" fueled the fastest inflation in 45 years, and he promised better food supplies and a slowdown in the lifting of price controls in the coming year. Li said retail price inflation of 21.
NEWS
July 9, 1994 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Chinese Premier Li Peng canceled official appearances and retreated to his Munich hotel after being hounded by protesters during a weeklong visit to Germany. Rather than face more noisy human rights protests, Li opted out of an afternoon boat trip and farm visit outside Munich after meeting with business leaders, the Bavarian state press office said.
NEWS
September 2, 1991 | DAVID HOLLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Sino-Vietnamese relations, strained for more than a decade, will soon be normalized, China announced Sunday. Progress toward a political settlement of the factional fighting in Cambodia is the key factor allowing normalization of ties, Premier Li Peng said in remarks quoted Sunday by the New China News Agency. "We had said before that Sino-Vietnamese relations would gradually return to normal along with a comprehensive, just and reasonable political settlement of the Cambodian issue," Li said.
NEWS
March 12, 1990 | From Times staff and Wire reports
Premier Li Peng will travel to Moscow in late April, in the first visit by a Chinese head of government to the Soviet Union in nearly 30 years, Soviet sources in Beijing said. Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev's visit to Beijing last May helped to patch up Sino-Soviet relations. However, his trip was overshadowed by pro-democracy demonstrations, which ended in a bloody crackdown by the Beijing government.
NEWS
April 20, 1994 | IAN MacWILLIAM, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Promising that China will not try to reassert its traditional influence in this region, Chinese Premier Li Peng has launched a 12-day tour down the ancient Silk Road, which winds through the newly independent Central Asian nations. "Even when our economy is developed and our country becomes rich and powerful, we will never claim hegemony and will always maintain friendly relations based on equal rights," Li told officials in this Uzbek capital Tuesday, the morning after his arrival.
NEWS
June 15, 1993 | DAVID HOLLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Premier Li Peng, smiling and generally looking healthy, reappeared in public Monday after being sidelined for seven weeks with an illness widely believed to have been a mild heart attack. Li presided over a welcoming ceremony in the Great Hall of the People for visiting Malaysian Prime Minister Mahathir Mohammed. He then held 80 minutes of formal talks with Mahathir, according to the official New China News Agency.
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