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Li Shuxian

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 21, 1989
We have ample precedent for sheltering Fang Lizhi and his wife, Li Shuxian, in the U.S. Embassy at Beijing. For 15 years--from 1956 to 1971--the U.S. gave refuge to Hungarian Cardinal Jozsef Mindszenty in the U.S. Embassy at Budapest. Don't give up Fang and Li! LEO E. PERSELLIN Rancho Palos Verdes
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 8, 2012 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
Fang Lizhi, one of China'sbest-known dissidents whose speeches inspired student protesters throughout the 1980s, has died in the United States, where he fled after China's 1989 military crackdown on the pro-democracy movement. He was 76. His wife, Li Shuxian, confirmed that he died Friday in Tucson, where he had been a University of Arizona physics professor for about 20 years. As a leading astrophysicist in China and a senior administrator at the Chinese University of Science and Technology, Fang was once a ranking member of the Community Party.
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NEWS
January 4, 1990 | From United Press International
China on Wednesday dismissed as "speculation" the reports of a deal to free the country's leading dissident from refuge in the U.S. Embassy, but Western diplomats and Chinese sources said the negotiations are continuing. "The recent rumors about the question of Fang Lizhi floating around abroad and overseas are speculation pure and simple," the Chinese Foreign Ministry statement said, reiterating that the embassy refuge was "interference in China's internal affairs."
NEWS
June 30, 1990 | MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Appealing for a life of peace, quiet and academic seclusion, Chinese political dissident and astrophysicist Fang Lizhi and his wife made it clear Friday that they are abandoning the high-profile political role that helped spark last year's pro-democracy movement in China and forced the couple to spend the past year confined to the U.S. Embassy in Beijing.
NEWS
June 27, 1990 | From Times Wire Services
Fang Lizhi, China's most prominent dissident, said Tuesday that he will continue to work for progress in his homeland as he returns to an academic life in Britain. Fang and his wife, Li Shuxian, arrived in London after Chinese authorities Monday allowed them to leave their yearlong refuge in the U.S. Embassy in Beijing.
NEWS
January 5, 1990 | JIM MANN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Bush Administration's highly publicized effort to win the release of Chinese dissidents Fang Lizhi and Li Shuxian from the U.S. Embassy in Beijing has run into serious obstacles that could scuttle chances for a deal. Since the mission to China last month by National Security Adviser Brent Scowcroft, the Administration has been exploring a deal with the Chinese regime that would enable Fang and Li, his wife, to go abroad. They have been confined inside the U.S.
NEWS
January 6, 1990 | JIM MANN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Bush said Friday that there has been some progress on human rights in China as a result of the secret trips to Beijing by Brent Scowcroft, his national security adviser. "The Voice of America, for example . . . you know, they have a person permitted to go there (to China)," Bush said at a news conference. Moreover, he said, China has repeated pledges not to sell missiles in the Middle East, "which I think is in the interest of peace in the world."
NEWS
June 30, 1990 | MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Appealing for a life of peace, quiet and academic seclusion, Chinese political dissident and astrophysicist Fang Lizhi and his wife made it clear Friday that they are abandoning the high-profile political role that helped spark last year's pro-democracy movement in China and forced the couple to spend the past year confined to the U.S. Embassy in Beijing.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 8, 2012 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
Fang Lizhi, one of China'sbest-known dissidents whose speeches inspired student protesters throughout the 1980s, has died in the United States, where he fled after China's 1989 military crackdown on the pro-democracy movement. He was 76. His wife, Li Shuxian, confirmed that he died Friday in Tucson, where he had been a University of Arizona physics professor for about 20 years. As a leading astrophysicist in China and a senior administrator at the Chinese University of Science and Technology, Fang was once a ranking member of the Community Party.
NEWS
June 12, 1990 | JIM MANN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In effect, they are hostages and political exiles marooned on a tiny American island amid a churning Chinese ocean. American diplomats have privately dubbed them "the guests," or sometimes, "the furniture." He is China's leading dissident, Fang Lizhi, and she is his wife, Li Shuxian. And they've spent the last year, since soon after the bloodletting around Tian An Men Square last June, in the American Embassy in Beijing, waiting for statesmen to negotiate their future.
NEWS
June 27, 1990 | From Times Wire Services
Fang Lizhi, China's most prominent dissident, said Tuesday that he will continue to work for progress in his homeland as he returns to an academic life in Britain. Fang and his wife, Li Shuxian, arrived in London after Chinese authorities Monday allowed them to leave their yearlong refuge in the U.S. Embassy in Beijing.
NEWS
June 26, 1990 | JIM MANN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In an apparent effort to regain international financial support, the Chinese government Monday permitted Fang Lizhi, the country's leading dissident, and his wife to leave their yearlong confinement inside the U.S. Embassy in Beijing and fly to freedom and a new academic job in Britain. A U.S. Air Force C-135, specially dispatched from Japan, picked up Fang and his wife, Li Shuxian, in Beijing and took them to London.
NEWS
June 12, 1990 | JIM MANN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In effect, they are hostages and political exiles marooned on a tiny American island amid a churning Chinese ocean. American diplomats have privately dubbed them "the guests," or sometimes, "the furniture." He is China's leading dissident, Fang Lizhi, and she is his wife, Li Shuxian. And they've spent the last year, since soon after the bloodletting around Tian An Men Square last June, in the American Embassy in Beijing, waiting for statesmen to negotiate their future.
NEWS
January 10, 1990 | JIM MANN and ART PINE, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
In an indication that it is slowing its efforts to repair relations with the Chinese leadership, the Bush Administration has decided to oppose the resumption of a massive $700-million World Bank loan program to China. World Bank loans are the most important single benefit China has lost from the West since the crushing of the democracy movement at Tian An Men Square last June.
NEWS
January 6, 1990 | JIM MANN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Bush said Friday that there has been some progress on human rights in China as a result of the secret trips to Beijing by Brent Scowcroft, his national security adviser. "The Voice of America, for example . . . you know, they have a person permitted to go there (to China)," Bush said at a news conference. Moreover, he said, China has repeated pledges not to sell missiles in the Middle East, "which I think is in the interest of peace in the world."
NEWS
January 5, 1990 | JIM MANN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Bush Administration's highly publicized effort to win the release of Chinese dissidents Fang Lizhi and Li Shuxian from the U.S. Embassy in Beijing has run into serious obstacles that could scuttle chances for a deal. Since the mission to China last month by National Security Adviser Brent Scowcroft, the Administration has been exploring a deal with the Chinese regime that would enable Fang and Li, his wife, to go abroad. They have been confined inside the U.S.
NEWS
June 26, 1990 | JIM MANN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In an apparent effort to regain international financial support, the Chinese government Monday permitted Fang Lizhi, the country's leading dissident, and his wife to leave their yearlong confinement inside the U.S. Embassy in Beijing and fly to freedom and a new academic job in Britain. A U.S. Air Force C-135, specially dispatched from Japan, picked up Fang and his wife, Li Shuxian, in Beijing and took them to London.
NEWS
January 10, 1990 | JIM MANN and ART PINE, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
In an indication that it is slowing its efforts to repair relations with the Chinese leadership, the Bush Administration has decided to oppose the resumption of a massive $700-million World Bank loan program to China. World Bank loans are the most important single benefit China has lost from the West since the crushing of the democracy movement at Tian An Men Square last June.
NEWS
January 4, 1990 | From United Press International
China on Wednesday dismissed as "speculation" the reports of a deal to free the country's leading dissident from refuge in the U.S. Embassy, but Western diplomats and Chinese sources said the negotiations are continuing. "The recent rumors about the question of Fang Lizhi floating around abroad and overseas are speculation pure and simple," the Chinese Foreign Ministry statement said, reiterating that the embassy refuge was "interference in China's internal affairs."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 21, 1989
We have ample precedent for sheltering Fang Lizhi and his wife, Li Shuxian, in the U.S. Embassy at Beijing. For 15 years--from 1956 to 1971--the U.S. gave refuge to Hungarian Cardinal Jozsef Mindszenty in the U.S. Embassy at Budapest. Don't give up Fang and Li! LEO E. PERSELLIN Rancho Palos Verdes
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