Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsLia Rousset
IN THE NEWS

Lia Rousset

FEATURED ARTICLES
SPORTS
July 7, 1993 | BARBIE LUDOVISE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It wasn't the most impressive way to start a career. Not unless you consider lying face down in the muck a whirlwind beginning. But that was the position Lia Rousset found herself in three years ago when she started kayaking. Each time the Newport Beach resident set out from the dock of the Newport Aquatics Center, she did so wondering whether she would end up, splish, splash, taking a bath in the muddy waters of Upper Newport Bay. Apparently, that was the norm.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 21, 1996 | HOPE HAMASHIGE
Lia Rousset is the envy of her classmates at Newport Harbor High: The 18-year-old senior checked out of high school forever after being selected as a member of the Olympic women's kayak team. Between now and July, Rousset will train full time in Chula Vista at an Olympic training center with the other Olympics-bound kayakers, including Rousset's training partner, DeAnne Hemmens of Costa Mesa.
Advertisement
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 21, 1996 | HOPE HAMASHIGE
Lia Rousset is the envy of her classmates at Newport Harbor High: The 18-year-old senior checked out of high school forever after being selected as a member of the Olympic women's kayak team. Between now and July, Rousset will train full time in Chula Vista at an Olympic training center with the other Olympics-bound kayakers, including Rousset's training partner, DeAnne Hemmens of Costa Mesa.
SPORTS
July 7, 1993 | BARBIE LUDOVISE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It wasn't the most impressive way to start a career. Not unless you consider lying face down in the muck a whirlwind beginning. But that was the position Lia Rousset found herself in three years ago when she started kayaking. Each time the Newport Beach resident set out from the dock of the Newport Aquatics Center, she did so wondering whether she would end up, splish, splash, taking a bath in the muddy waters of Upper Newport Bay. Apparently, that was the norm.
SPORTS
March 19, 1996
Newport Beach's Lia Rousset, 18, has become the youngest qualifier for the 1996 U.S. Olympic women's kayak team. Rousset, a senior at Newport Harbor, and partner DeAnne Hemmens, 30, of Costa Mesa, were named to the four-person team Sunday night at the Arco Olympic Training Center in Chula Vista. They also won the two-person trials, but Hemmens said they had to face one more challenge race on Monday. Rousset said making the team "seemed like a dream to me."
NEWS
August 1, 1996 | Times Wire Services
Switching partners and distances is proving easier than John Mooney thought. He qualified for his second Olympic semifinal in the flatwater canoe and kayak competition, this time with Stein Jorgensen in the 500-meter two-man kayak. Tuesday, he teamed with Peter Newton to advance to the 1,000-meter two-man kayak semifinal. Of five U.S. boats racing in six events in the morning, only two qualified for the semifinals directly while the rest advanced through afternoon second-chance races.
NEWS
August 3, 1996 | Times Wire Services
Even America's best paddlers weren't good enough to win a canoe-kayak medal. The United States sent five boats into the semifinals, and all five failed to advance. The same thing had happened Thursday. Italy, meanwhile, sent five boats to the flatwater events and each will race in the finals. Not even John Mooney and Stein Jorgensen, world champions in the 200-meter kayak, could break the U.S.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 4, 1995 | NANCY HSU and LISA RESPERS, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Lia Rousset, 17, was bicycling to school last month when she hit "some kind of little pole" and was knocked unconscious. "That day, I was thinking, 'I don't want to wear my helmet,' " recalled the Newport Harbor High School junior. "I had a ski hat on, and the helmet was getting in the way, but I decided to wear it anyway." She is glad she did. As she convincingly found out, a helmet "could make or break your life."
SPORTS
May 14, 1993 | BARBIE LUDOVISE
A mole, we are told, can dig a 6 1/2-foot tunnel in 12 minutes. In the same amount of time, you could fix yourself a cup of coffee, butter some toast and polish off this column. Just something to think about while you breeze through today's tidbits . . . * What does $2.40, $32.50 and 74 cents buy you these days? One plastic jump rope, 50 pounds in dumbbells and a coach's whistle, respectively. That's what we hear from the bill-payers at Corona del Mar, Newport Harbor and Estancia, anyway.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 28, 1994 | NANCY HSU, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Lia Rousset, 17, was bicycling to school last month when she hit "some kind of little pole" and was knocked unconscious. "That day, I was thinking, 'I don't want to wear my helmet,' " recalled the Newport Harbor High School junior. "I had a ski hat on, and the helmet was getting in the way, but I decided to wear it anyway." She's glad she did. As she convincingly found out, a helmet "could make or break your life."
SPORTS
April 12, 1996
Here's a look at some athletes with Orange County ties who have qualified for or are hoping to compete for the United States in the Summer Olympics in Atlanta. Listed are athletes' hometown, current residence or school. BADMINTON Erika von Heiland Age: 30 Anaheim Von Heiland, who lost in the first round of singles in the 1992 Olympics in Barcelona, is hoping to get back in doubles with partner Linda French of Elmhurst, Ill.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|