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BUSINESS
December 16, 1994 | LESLIE HELM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In an ominous new twist to the Pentium chip controversy, computer users in corporations around the world are rushing to establish whether a flaw in the Intel microprocessor may have resulted in miscalculations that could make them vulnerable to lawsuits or trouble from government agencies.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 19, 2014 | By Hector Becerra
A controversy-riddled water district involved in a federal corruption investigation is in danger of losing its insurance, a political black eye that could have implications for the agency and its 2 million customers. The Assn. of California Water Agencies Joint Powers Insurance Authority has recommended to its board that it drop the employment liability insurance for Central Basin Municipal Water District, citing the circus-like atmosphere at the agency. The authority insures hundreds of water districts across the state, and this would be only the second time in its 35-year history that it canceled coverage for a water district.
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BUSINESS
January 6, 2012 | By Jim Puzzanghera, This post has been corrected, as indicated below
The Securities and Exchange Commission said Friday it no longer would settle civil suits without an admission of liability in cases in which the defendant has been convicted of criminal violations or admitted to them. The policy change comes after a federal judge in November rejected a $285 million settlement between the SEC and Citigroup Inc. in which liability was neither admitted nor denied. The judge  harshly criticized the agency for imposing a "relatively modest" punishment on large banks for wrongdoing leading up to the financial crisis.
BUSINESS
March 25, 2014 | By Jerry Hirsch
Margie Beskau would seem to have a strong lawsuit against General Motors for millions in damages. Eight years ago, her 15-year-old daughter, Amy Rademaker, died in a Chevrolet Cobalt - one of the cars the automaker has now admitted had a deadly safety defect. A faulty ignition switch shut off the car, leaving its teenage driver without power steering, brakes or air bags. But Beskau probably will never collect in the civil courts, legal experts say, because GM has been absolved of all responsibility for crashes before the automaker's 2009 bankruptcy and federal bailout.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 24, 2014 | By Maura Dolan
SAN FRANCISCO -- Party hosts who ask guests to pay a cover charge to defray costs may be held legally responsible if an underage drinker becomes intoxicated and hurts himself or others, the California Supreme Court decided Monday. In a unanimous ruling, the state high court said a cover charge amounts to a sale of alcohol, and state law creates liability for those who sell alcohol to obviously intoxicated minors. The decision is most likely to affect student parties, where underage drinking and cover charges are common.
BUSINESS
July 13, 1987 | VICTOR F. ZONANA, Times Staff Writer
Banks that play hardball with borrowers are finding themselves the target of suits alleging breach of good faith, breach of fiduciary duty, fraud, intentional infliction of emotional distress and even slander. Not long ago, the main thing banks had to worry about was whether their borrowers could pay their loans back on time.
BUSINESS
October 1, 2012 | By Hugo Martin
It turns out that those fares to London on British Airways were too good to be true. And now the airlines is paying the price. The U.S. Department of Transportation has fined the airline based in Waterside, England, $250,000 for failing to include the full cost of its advertised fares and refusing to accept liability for fragile or expensive items lost or damage in flights. “Consumers deserve fair treatment from airlines when it comes to price advertising and being reimbursed for lost, damaged or stolen baggage,” U.S. Transportation Secretary Ray LaHood said in a statement.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 24, 2014 | By Maura Dolan
SAN FRANCISCO - Party hosts who ask guests to pay a cover charge to defray costs may be held legally responsible if an underage drinker becomes intoxicated and hurts himself or others, the California Supreme Court decided Monday. In a unanimous ruling, the high court said a cover charge amounts to a sale of alcohol, and state law creates liability for those who sell alcohol to obviously intoxicated minors. The decision, which overturned two lower court rulings, is most likely to affect student parties, where underage drinking and cover charges are common.
SPORTS
June 9, 2012 | By Bill Shaikin
It has been eight years since that Steve Finley grand slam, eight long years since the last truly great race between the Dodgers and the San Francisco Giants. The Dodgers and Giants have distanced themselves from the pack in the National League West this year, and the rivals face off in the final series of the regular season. Imagine the intensity if the division championship were to come down to that one last game, Clayton Kershaw for the Dodgers and Tim Lincecum for the Giants.
BUSINESS
June 27, 2010 | By Barry Stone
Question: I recently inherited an old home that is in general disrepair. I want to sell it but am concerned about disclosure liability. I'd like to do an as-is sale and simply disclose all the defects I am aware of. If a buyer signs an as-is contract, can I still be sued or held liable for defects that I fail to disclose? If so, how can I protect myself? Answer: Disclosure liability can always be reduced, but it can never be eliminated completely. This is because people can file lawsuits for any or no reason at all. The best you can do is to eliminate as many reasons as possible.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 24, 2014 | By Maura Dolan
SAN FRANCISCO -- Party hosts who ask guests to pay a cover charge to defray costs may be held legally responsible if an underage drinker becomes intoxicated and hurts himself or others, the California Supreme Court decided Monday. In a unanimous ruling, the state high court said a cover charge amounts to a sale of alcohol, and state law creates liability for those who sell alcohol to obviously intoxicated minors. The decision is most likely to affect student parties, where underage drinking and cover charges are common.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 24, 2014 | By Maura Dolan
SAN FRANCISCO - Party hosts who ask guests to pay a cover charge to defray costs may be held legally responsible if an underage drinker becomes intoxicated and hurts himself or others, the California Supreme Court decided Monday. In a unanimous ruling, the high court said a cover charge amounts to a sale of alcohol, and state law creates liability for those who sell alcohol to obviously intoxicated minors. The decision, which overturned two lower court rulings, is most likely to affect student parties, where underage drinking and cover charges are common.
BUSINESS
February 23, 2014 | By Donie Vanitzian
Question: All owners in my association received a letter from the board's vice president along with photos showing everything that's wrong in our building. Some things that were listed as "wrong" have been dormant for dozens of years, and still this high-rise has not fallen down and his issues do not pose a liability. Some things have been deliberately tampered with by the vice president so he could say that they are "wrong. " Now that he has sent this list to all owners, what are the ramifications if we want to sell our units?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 22, 2014 | George Skelton, Capitol Journal
SACRAMENTO - So the state of the state's governor is static - at least until he is safely reelected. Until the election year blows over, Gov. Jerry Brown is stationary - in a crouch, protecting himself politically, satisfied with the status quo. In his 30th year in elective office - 12th as governor, after failing in three bids for the presidency and one for the U.S. Senate, and growing up watching his politician father - Brown is instinctively cautious...
SPORTS
January 9, 2014 | By David Wharton, This post has been corrected. See the note below for details.
Pushing toward his fifth trip to the Winter Olympics, Bode Miller faces some tough obstacles, and it's not surprising that age ranks at the top of the list. “I'm healthy enough that I'm skiing as hard as I can," Miller, speaking from Germany, said on the "Today" show Thursday. "But I'm definitely feeling my age ... I'm trying to catch up to the young kids right now.” The 36-year-old Miller, who made his Olympic debut in 1998 and has won five medals since, would be one of the oldest American athletes at the 2014 Sochi Games in February.
SPORTS
November 25, 2013 | By Helene Elliott
VANCOUVER, Canada - Ten former NHL players have claimed in a class-action lawsuit the league was negligent in withholding and misrepresenting information about the consequences of repeated blows to the head, contributing to players' brain injuries and neurological disorders. The lawsuit, filed Monday in U.S. District Court for the District of Columbia, seeks compensatory and punitive damages in addition to a court-supervised, league-funded medical monitoring program to diagnose and treat head injuries.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 7, 1990
A federal judge in Los Angeles has absolved Rock Hudson's insurance company--Aetna Casualty & Surety Co.--of liability in a $14.5-million judgment awarded by a jury last year to the late actor's lover. U.S. District Judge A. Wallace Tashima, who made the ruling on Monday, found that Aetna does not have to pay any part of the award because Hudson never told Marc Christian that he had AIDS.
BUSINESS
November 19, 2013 | By Stuart Pfeifer
JPMorgan Chase & Co. said the $13 billion settlement it reached with the Justice Department, state attorneys general and other agencies erased most of its potential liability in the sale of faulty mortgage investments that fueled the 2008 financial crisis. "Today's settlement resolves actual and potential civil claims by the Department of Justice, several state attorneys general, the Federal Deposit Insurance Corp., the National Credit Union Administration and the Federal Housing Finance Agency relating to residential mortgage-backed securities activities by JPMorgan Chase, Bear Stearns and Washington Mutual," the company said in a news release.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 14, 2013 | By Howard Blume
Four Los Angeles schools, scheduled to receive iPads in this first rollout of the tablets, have pulled out of the initial phase, saying that they want to wait at least until security and other issues are resolved. The rejection apparently is temporary - the schools still want the tablet computers - but their stance underscores ongoing problems faced by the L.A. Unified School District as it attempts to provide every student with a tablet over the next year. Separately, a state legislator is calling for an oversight hearing to review the $1-billion project, which is funded by school-construction bonds.
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