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Liability Insurance

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NATIONAL
May 5, 2013 | By Devin Kelly
The fertilizer plant that exploded last month in West, Texas, holds just $1 million in liability insurance, a negligible amount compared to the estimated cost of the damage caused by the blast, lawyers said. John McCoy, one of the attorneys representing the company that owns West Fertilizer Co., confirmed the amount in an email to the Los Angeles Times after the Dallas Morning News reported it Friday. He said the plant did not hold excess or umbrella insurance policies. “We do not yet know how this horrific accident occurred,” McCoy added in the email.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 18, 2014 | By Melanie Mason
SACRAMENTO - A protracted political battle over California's medical malpractice law may be coming to a new front: the voting booth. For decades, trial lawyers and consumer groups have railed against limits on certain damages in malpractice cases, arguing that such restrictions deny victims fair compensation for grisly medical mistakes. Insurance companies, doctors and other healthcare providers have been equally vigorous in defending the law, saying it is crucial to controlling costs and maintaining the availability of care.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 19, 1989
Your article (Nov. 11) about the poisoning of several horses at the Orange County Fairgrounds points up again the need for products liability insurance. The feed company's attorney said, "Who would ever think of getting insurance for something as simple as alfalfa?" Anyone in the feed business should know that products liability insurance is probably more important than any other insurance they obtain, with the exception of workers' compensation coverage. Several years ago in Texas a similar feed poisoning occurred with payments running into the millions.
OPINION
February 16, 2014
Re "To bee, or not to bee?," Feb. 13 Like one of the bee-keepers in your article, I live in Mt. Washington. Several years ago, my former neighbor kept bees. I am allergic to bee stings and had told him so as soon as I saw the hive box in his yard. One day, as I was coming home from work, I got out of my car and threw some trash away. My trash cans are right across from my neighbor's garage, where he was trying to extract the honey, unbeknown to me. The bees attacked me as soon as I reached my trash cans.
BUSINESS
June 16, 2000 | LIZ PULLIAM WESTON
Things to do this weekend with your money The liability coverage in your insurance policies protects your assets if you are sued by someone. Here's how to check if you have enough coverage. * Today: Determine your "insurable net worth"--in essence, what you have to lose should you be sued. Include the equity in your home, other real estate and cars, plus any savings you have. Art, jewelry, collectibles and other valuables should also be considered.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 8, 1986 | JEFFREY A. PERLMAN, Times Urban Affairs Writer
Faced with mounting liability insurance costs, Orange County Transit District directors voted Monday to go "bare" and make OCTD one of the nation's largest self-insured public transit agencies. The Chicago Transit Authority--second largest in the country--took similar action last year. OCTD, which operates the nation's 19th-largest public transit system, has a 575-bus fleet and carries 37 million passengers annually.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 12, 1985 | ROBERT SCHWARTZ, Times Staff Writer
A group of 10 cities in Orange County has decided to renew a liability insurance policy that expired Wednesday at a cost of $2.6 million, almost three times the old price. The City of Orange dropped out of the group insurance pool late Tuesday, deciding to "go bare"--to carry no insurance and rely on its own reserves--rather than pay the sharply increased premiums. Orange is the first of the county's 26 cities to become self-insured.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 13, 1986 | GABE FUENTES, Times Staff Writer
They'll soon take the skis off the racks in the University Student Union at California State University, Northridge. They'll clean the shelves of ski boots and gather all the poles. Then they'll move it all to a dark storage room in the basement. Rising liability insurance costs prompted the student union this month to suspend the rental of ski equipment indefinitely and cancel a variety of outdoor trips and excursions.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 8, 1987 | GEORGE RAMOS, Times Staff Writer
Tent City II, the temporary encampment that was home to downtown's transients during the holidays, was dismantled Wednesday after its organizers failed to get the liability insurance they needed to keep the shelter open on state land across from City Hall. The end came without incident when state authorities ordered the removal of the 5,000-square-foot circus tent that had been the heart of Tent City since it was erected on Dec. 26. "Tent City II is over," said its organizer, Ted Hayes.
NEWS
April 3, 1986 | ERIC BAILEY, Times Staff Writer
Defusing a crisis that threatened to bring the upcoming Long Beach Grand Prix to a screeching halt, the City Council agreed Tuesday to slash in half the liability insurance requirement for the race's promoters. The council voted unanimously to allow the Long Beach Grand Prix Assn. to provide $10 million in insurance instead of the $20 million required in previous years.
OPINION
February 6, 2014 | By The Times editorial board
In the new world of the sharing economy, companies such as Uber, Lyft and Sidecar have made a compelling case that government shouldn't treat them the same way it treats conventional service providers. They're not taxi companies; instead, they empower people to act as part-time limo drivers. But regulators still have to make sure that the public is protected when something goes wrong. A recent fatal accident involving a driver who used Uber highlights gaps in the insurance coverage that ride-sharing services, their drivers and state regulators can't ignore.
BUSINESS
February 5, 2014 | By Marc Lifsher and Salvador Rodriguez
SACRAMENTO - A deadly accident involving a California ride-sharing driver has brought to light a potential downside to this new high-tech carpooling: Who pays when something goes wrong? Companies such as Uber, Lyft and Sidecar have long insisted that the insurance they provide their drivers is sufficient to cover accidents. But a recent tragedy shows the murky legal terrain in which these new taxi-like services operate. On New Year's Eve, an Uber driver struck and killed a 6-year-old girl who was crossing a San Francisco street with her family.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 17, 2013 | By Paloma Esquivel
Orange County won't be creating a Megan's Law-style website for dangerous dogs any time soon. The county Board of Supervisors had been considering creating an online database listing the addresses of homes where dangerous dogs are kept, but on Tuesday a majority of supervisors said they don't support such a site. “I think that whole area needs a lot more study before we go in that direction,” said Supervisor Patricia Bates. The website had been included in a proposed ordinance defining vicious and potentially dangerous dogs and outlining the county's recourses for dealing with them.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 18, 2013 | By Paloma Esquivel
Flip-flops are banned at two city parks in San Juan Capistrano, and now city officials are scratching their heads, trying to figure out how and why the rule came to be. The flip-flop ban affects Los Rios Park in the city's historic district and a recently opened dog park, said city spokeswoman Cathy Salcedo. The rule had gone largely unnoticed at Los Rios. But when the dog park opened in August and the rules were posted, several commissioners with the city's Parks, Recreation and Senior Services were befuddled.
NEWS
September 18, 2013 | By Paul Whitefield
File this under “Things that make you go 'Huh?,' California section”: The city of San Juan Capistrano has banned flip-flops at two city parks. And better yet: City officials apparently didn't know they'd done it. And even better yet: It's a rule, but no one is enforcing it. OK, insert your “crazy Californians” joke here. But really, what's next: banning bikinis at the beach, or Ray Bans, or fire pits ? (Oh, wait, scratch that last one.) Now, to most of the country, San Juan Capistrano is the place the swallows return to. To generations of Southern California schoolchildren, it's where you go to see a Spanish mission; and then you coerce mom or dad into making a model of it for you for your school mission project, part of a time-honored tradition.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 17, 2013 | By Paloma Esquivel
City officials in San Juan Capistrano are trying to figure out exactly how flip-flops became banned at two city parks. The flip-flop ban is in place at Los Rios Park in the city's historic district and at a recently opened dog park, said city spokeswoman Cathy Salcedo. The ban was first reported by the Orange County Register. The rule had gone largely unnoticed at Los Rios. But when the dog park opened in August and the rules were posted, several commissioners with the city's Parks, Recreation and Senior Services were befuddled.
REAL ESTATE
October 24, 1993 | JAN HICKENBOTTOM, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES; Hickenbottom is a past president of the Greater Los Angeles chapter of the Community Associations Institute (CAI), a national nonprofit research and educational organization
QUESTION: We are part of a homeowner association with 14 single-family homes on a private street. The president of the board of directors wants to discontinue the directors' and officers' liability insurance to save money. I fear that no one will want to serve on the board if we have no insurance to protect the board from lawsuits. Is this legal? What do you advise? ANSWER: Your board president's idea of cutting insurance costs is unwise.
NEWS
August 15, 1985 | DARYL KELLEY, Times Staff Writer
Reeling from a string of multimillion-dollar jury awards and a ruinous six-year nationwide price war, insurance companies have increased the cost of basic liability policies for cities in the Long Beach and Southeast areas by as much as 650%. In Montebello, where premiums have soared from $62,700 to $472,000 in one year, the city received just one bid this spring from an industry elbowing its way out of the municipal insurance business.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 19, 2013 | By Stephen Ceasar
Carter Paysinger, the principal of Beverly Hills High School, said Monday that he welcomes an independent review called by the Beverly Hills Unified School District into the for-profit summer sports camp he owns. The review was in response to an article in The Times last week that reported that the Beverly Hills Sports Academy, held on campus, is owned by Paysinger and operated by two school employees. Parents say they were led to believe that the academy was a mandatory school-sanctioned camp for athletes and that fees would help fund sports teams.
NATIONAL
July 23, 2013 | By Matt Pearce
There's no way around it: Rosy Esparza's death on a Six Flags Over Texas roller coaster ride in Arlington on Friday was horrific. On Tuesday, the Tarrant County Medical Examiner's Office released more details on what happened when the 52-year-old woman fell out of her restraints while riding the Texas Giant roller coaster. She was seated in the third row, the medical examiner's office said, "and as the carts began the steep descent from the first large hill of track, she was ejected from her seat falling freely for an approximate distance of 75 feet, striking a support metal beam and then coming to rest on the metal roof of the tunnel.
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