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Libbe S Halevy

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ENTERTAINMENT
April 3, 1989 | LYNN HEFFLEY
I n a pool of dim light on a small stage, a stout, middle-aged man, his balding head crowned with a monkish fringe, kneels on a tiny wooden platform. His round face breaks into a grin; he speaks, incongruously, in the lisping tones of a child: "My daddy can't hit me today; he got a finger cut off at work." Audience laughter, sharply expelled, momentarily breaks the tense silence at the Santa Monica Playhouse.
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ENTERTAINMENT
July 25, 1990 | CORINNE FLOCKEN
Oh, the secrets of childhood. A crush on the new girl in class, a peek at a yet-to-be-wrapped Christmas gift, those warm, delicious confidences you shared only with your best friend on the condition he would "cross his heart, hope to die," and never, ever tell. Charming? Yes. Unless that secret is incest. "Shattered Secrets," a play by Libbe S. HaLevy, follows seven men and women, all childhood victims of incest, in their attempts to deal with the crime's psychological effects.
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ENTERTAINMENT
July 25, 1990 | CORINNE FLOCKEN
Oh, the secrets of childhood. A crush on the new girl in class, a peek at a yet-to-be-wrapped Christmas gift, those warm, delicious confidences you shared only with your best friend on the condition he would "cross his heart, hope to die," and never, ever tell. Charming? Yes. Unless that secret is incest. "Shattered Secrets," a play by Libbe S. HaLevy, follows seven men and women, all childhood victims of incest, in their attempts to deal with the crime's psychological effects.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 3, 1989 | LYNN HEFFLEY
I n a pool of dim light on a small stage, a stout, middle-aged man, his balding head crowned with a monkish fringe, kneels on a tiny wooden platform. His round face breaks into a grin; he speaks, incongruously, in the lisping tones of a child: "My daddy can't hit me today; he got a finger cut off at work." Audience laughter, sharply expelled, momentarily breaks the tense silence at the Santa Monica Playhouse.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 19, 1996
The National Academy of Songwriters will hold the first in a series of free question-and-answer sessions for those interested in creating musicals for theater at the Musicians' Institute, 1655 McCadden Place, Hollywood, on Jan. 25 from 7-9 p.m. Hosted by Kevin Kaufman and Libbe S. HaLevy, the session will include discussions about alternative songwriter markets, collaboration, Broadway-level craft and an open forum on other subjects of interest in the field. Information: (213) 463-7178.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 11, 2000
"The Making of the Musical 'The Last Session,' " featuring a discussion with the show's composer-lyricist Steve Schalchlin and author-director Jim Brochu, will be presented by Broadway on Sunset on May 22 at 7:30 p.m., at Upstairs at the Coronet Theatre, 368 N. La Cienega Blvd. After workshopping at the Zephyr Theatre in 1996, "The Last Session" went on to critically acclaimed, extended hit runs between 1997 and 1999 in New York, at the Laguna Playhouse and at the Tiffany Theater.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 28, 2002
In Reed Johnson's excellent report on nudity in L.A. theater ("Bare Truths of Character," April 21), he neglected to mention one of the more effective and controversial uses of the naked body on the local stage. I'm referring to Joan Hotchkis' "Elements of Flesh," a solo performance on aging and sexuality that played at Highways and throughout the Southland in 1996-97. The sight of the elegant Hotchkis tastefully posed with bare buttocks and a coy smile, daring to be sexy at 68 years of age, flipped people out. The show generated hate mail, newspapers refused to print the production's ads, and even the beyond-liberal audiences of Highways called to complain and cancel their memberships.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 10, 2000
Thanks for the wonderful article on musical theater's appeal to pop musicians ("From Rock to Broadway," by Randy Lewis, June 1). What these artists need to realize is that all their great music will not make a musical without a strong libretto, one that presents an engaging story with recognizable characters going through emotional changes until they reach a satisfying conclusion. Without it, all they have is a collection of songs, a concept album at best. With this elusive theatrical framework for their songs, they have the opportunity to touch the ages with their work.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 19, 1990 | JANICE ARKATOV
A well-known children's storyteller is sexually assaulted and traumatized in Laura Shamas' "Telling Time," opening Thursday at West Coast Ensemble. "The character, Annie Nesbitt, is a very gentle person," said Shamas. "She's the last person in the world you'd want something like this to happen to. When it does, her reality abruptly changes--and denial starts taking over. At that point, the playwright parts company with realism, as the storyteller's pain is revealed in metaphor and make-believe.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 17, 1989 | JAMES E. FOWLER, Fowler is a Granada Hills free-lance writer.
Jerry Craig says the play "Shattered Secrets" changed his life. Officials of the Antelope Valley Child Abuse Center are hoping it will do the same for people in Lancaster. The Hispanic Theatre Project production of Libbe S. HaLevy's play about members of a self-help program for incest survivors will be presented at Antelope Valley College tomorrow and Sunday. Craig, the Theatre Project's artistic director, said the play has served as a basis for his own recovery as an incest survivor.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 7, 1999 | DON SHIRLEY, Don Shirley is The Times' theater writer
The South Bay's only professional theater company, Civic Light Opera of South Bay Cities, is expanding on several fronts. Beginning with "West Side Story," which previews Wednesday and opens Saturday, the company's musicals at the 1,425-seat Redondo Beach Performing Arts Center will each play for three weeks instead of the previous two. "We were out of real estate.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 13, 1990 | ROBERT KOEHLER
Many people read Christopher Durang's "Laughing Wild" as his update on the kids in his "Sister Mary Ignatius Explains It All for You." Both plays have much in common: an elliptical structure of group scenes and monologues, and seemingly Catholic characters. But "Laughing Wild" is just as easily read as Durang's look at how people did or didn't cope with the Reagan Era. Mostly didn't. This is even clearer with the new cast in Dennis Erdman's Tiffany Theatre production.
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