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NEWS
February 8, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
John Turner, the leader of Canada's Liberal Party, announced that he will resign as head of the official opposition and return to private law practice. Turner, 60, said he will keep his Vancouver district seat in the House of Commons and live in Toronto. Herb Gray of Windsor, Ontario, will take over as interim party leader. Turner will keep his post until a June 23 meeting, where six candidates will vie for the opening, including Turner's former deputy prime minister, Jean Chretien.
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WORLD
December 3, 2006 | From Times Wire Reports
The Liberal Party unexpectedly chose former Environment Minister Stephane Dion as its new leader, overlooking his political shortcomings -- a heavy French accent and unpopularity in his home province of Quebec -- that could undermine the party in an election expected next year. Dion, 51, beat the favorite, former Harvard academic Michael Ignatieff. The Liberals dominated Canadian politics for a century but lost to the Conservatives in January.
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NEWS
November 8, 1988
Canada's opposition Liberals have taken a 12-point lead over the ruling Conservatives, according to the latest opinion poll preceding the Nov. 21 federal election. The Gallup Canada poll of 1,041 voters gave the Liberal Party 43% of decided voters, against 31% for the Progressive Conservative Party and 22% for the left-leaning New Democratic Party.
WORLD
May 20, 2005 | Christopher Guly and Maggie Farley, Special to The Times
Canada's Liberal Party barely clung to power Thursday, winning a vote of confidence when the House speaker cast the first tiebreaker ever on such a motion. Last-minute support from two independent lawmakers split the House of Commons evenly, and Speaker Peter Milliken's vote left the Liberals in power, 153-152. Prime Minister Paul Martin, whose party has been wounded by a corruption scandal, acknowledged the slim margin in a speech amid hoots, cheers and catcalls from the packed chamber.
WORLD
May 20, 2005 | Christopher Guly and Maggie Farley, Special to The Times
Canada's Liberal Party barely clung to power Thursday, winning a vote of confidence when the House speaker cast the first tiebreaker ever on such a motion. Last-minute support from two independent lawmakers split the House of Commons evenly, and Speaker Peter Milliken's vote left the Liberals in power, 153-152. Prime Minister Paul Martin, whose party has been wounded by a corruption scandal, acknowledged the slim margin in a speech amid hoots, cheers and catcalls from the packed chamber.
NEWS
September 11, 1987 | KENNETH FREED, Times Staff Writer
The Liberal Party crushed its opposition in Ontario voting Thursday, winning its first provincial elections in 50 years and establishing party leader David Peterson as one of Canada's most powerful political figures.
WORLD
December 3, 2006 | From Times Wire Reports
The Liberal Party unexpectedly chose former Environment Minister Stephane Dion as its new leader, overlooking his political shortcomings -- a heavy French accent and unpopularity in his home province of Quebec -- that could undermine the party in an election expected next year. Dion, 51, beat the favorite, former Harvard academic Michael Ignatieff. The Liberals dominated Canadian politics for a century but lost to the Conservatives in January.
NEWS
March 26, 1996 | Associated Press
Prime Minister Jean Chretien's Liberal Party swept to victory Monday in five of six by-elections for vacant parliamentary seats, including one district where Quebec separatists had fielded a strong challenger. The Bloc Quebecois' only victory came in the central Quebec district of Lac-St.-Jean, where Stephane Tremblay, a 22-year-old student, easily defeated the Liberal candidate to fill the seat vacated by Lucien Bouchard.
NEWS
October 5, 1996 | From Times Wire Services
Canadian Prime Minister Jean Chretien abruptly forced the resignation Friday of his beleaguered defense minister, David M. Collenette, ostensibly for having inappropriately interfered with an immigration case. Chretien said he was extremely sorry to accept the resignation of his longtime friend and political ally but added: "I told him that I hope soon I'll be in a position to take him back into my Cabinet."
NEWS
May 4, 1989 | From Associated Press
John Turner, who led a dramatic but unsuccessful fight against Canada's free trade agreement with the United States, announced Wednesday that he is stepping down as leader of the opposition Liberal Party. The Liberals lost twice to Prime Minister Brian Mulroney's Progressive Conservative Party since Turner took over the leadership in 1984. The most recent defeat was in November, 1988. "It is my intention to resign as leader of the Liberal Party of Canada at an appropriate time, after the national executive has chosen a date for a leadership convention," Turner said in a letter released at an Ottawa news conference.
NEWS
March 26, 1996 | Associated Press
Prime Minister Jean Chretien's Liberal Party swept to victory Monday in five of six by-elections for vacant parliamentary seats, including one district where Quebec separatists had fielded a strong challenger. The Bloc Quebecois' only victory came in the central Quebec district of Lac-St.-Jean, where Stephane Tremblay, a 22-year-old student, easily defeated the Liberal candidate to fill the seat vacated by Lucien Bouchard.
NEWS
February 8, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
John Turner, the leader of Canada's Liberal Party, announced that he will resign as head of the official opposition and return to private law practice. Turner, 60, said he will keep his Vancouver district seat in the House of Commons and live in Toronto. Herb Gray of Windsor, Ontario, will take over as interim party leader. Turner will keep his post until a June 23 meeting, where six candidates will vie for the opening, including Turner's former deputy prime minister, Jean Chretien.
NEWS
November 8, 1988
Canada's opposition Liberals have taken a 12-point lead over the ruling Conservatives, according to the latest opinion poll preceding the Nov. 21 federal election. The Gallup Canada poll of 1,041 voters gave the Liberal Party 43% of decided voters, against 31% for the Progressive Conservative Party and 22% for the left-leaning New Democratic Party.
NEWS
September 11, 1987 | KENNETH FREED, Times Staff Writer
The Liberal Party crushed its opposition in Ontario voting Thursday, winning its first provincial elections in 50 years and establishing party leader David Peterson as one of Canada's most powerful political figures.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 1, 1987
As a delegate to the recent Liberal Party of Canada's national policy convention, I feel it is important to answer your editorial (DEc. 4), "Disaster in the Making." The Liberal Party's "swing to the left" may indeed be "worrisome" to those who see the world forever divided into two nuclear armed camps--capitalist and communist. For those who derive great economic benefit from the ever-expanding military-industrial complex, the possibility of Canada along with Britain, West Germany and New Zealand becoming much more independent of U.S. defense policy is, no doubt, even more terrifying than the prospect of a nuclear war itself.
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