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NEWS
November 22, 1992 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Liberia's army publicly executed a soldier who was convicted of murdering a civilian he believed was a rebel. Hundreds of people watched as nine soldiers fired three rounds at the soldier, who was tied to a post. Gen. Hezekiah Bowen, the chief of staff of Liberia's armed forces, told soldiers looking on that the soldier was an example of what would happen to troops caught looting and killing.
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NEWS
September 23, 1998 | From Times Wire Reports
Dozens of people died in a two-day spasm of gun battles in the capital, Monrovia, over the weekend after soldiers tried to arrest former Liberian warlord Roosevelt Johnson, who took refuge in the U.S. Embassy. Just days after the shooting died down, much appeared normal in the disarmingly relaxed seaside town. President Charles Taylor has promised that the U.S. Embassy will not come under attack. As stores reopened and people returned to work, platoons of soldiers headed to their barracks.
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NEWS
July 31, 1990 | From Times Wire Services
Troops loyal to Liberian President Samuel K. Doe massacred at least 600 refugees, including babies in their mothers' arms, in the sanctuary of a church where they had fled for safety in war-torn Monrovia, witnesses said Monday. State Department officials in Washington said late Monday that their information, based on reports from U.S. Embassy staff members still in Monrovia, put the death toll closer to 200.
NEWS
May 15, 1996 | BOB DROGIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Gen. Butt Naked, a youthful commander with a self-given nom de guerre, charges into battle each day stark nude except for a pair of boots. His men are allowed to wear underpants. Not far away, Gen. George Bush and Gen. Saddam Hussein command fighters who sometimes attack with such weapons as butter knives, golf clubs, tennis rackets and soldering irons. One youth even uses a can of insecticide.
NEWS
May 15, 1996 | BOB DROGIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Gen. Butt Naked, a youthful commander with a self-given nom de guerre, charges into battle each day stark nude except for a pair of boots. His men are allowed to wear underpants. Not far away, Gen. George Bush and Gen. Saddam Hussein command fighters who sometimes attack with such weapons as butter knives, golf clubs, tennis rackets and soldering irons. One youth even uses a can of insecticide.
NEWS
July 13, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Hundreds of Liberians fled in panic after soldiers made house-to-house searches in the capital, Monrovia, and fired at a fishing boat suspected of carrying rebels. Earlier, troops also fired into the Nigerian Embassy, where 150 people had sought refuge from the six-month-old civil war. The latest disturbances came as peace talks resumed in neighboring Sierra Leone between delegations representing the Liberian rebels and the embattled government of President Samuel K. Doe.
NEWS
July 17, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Liberia's enthusiastic but poorly trained rebels, who swept easily to the gates of the capital in recent fighting, are now meeting stiff resistance from government troops. Rebel leader Charles Taylor's National Patriotic Front of Liberia has been bogged down for the past week in its attempt to capture Scheffelin military camp, 18 miles from Monrovia. It is President Samuel K. Doe's last military stronghold outside the capital, but it has been cut off by rebel forces attacking on two fronts.
NEWS
January 10, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
At least 200 Liberian civilians were massacred in northern Liberia, and witnesses fleeing the country blamed the killings on government forces, a human rights group said. Africa Watch said in Washington that the slayings resulted from a Dec. 24 attempt to topple President Samuel K. Doe, who it said reportedly instructed troops to shoot on sight any suspicious person. Neighboring Ivory Coast reported that 8,000 to 10,000 Liberians fled there in recent days.
NEWS
October 3, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The West African peacekeeping force launched heavy artillery attacks against troops of the main rebel leader, Charles Taylor, in Monrovia. Smoke hung over government buildings in the capital close to the executive mansion, from which soldiers loyal to the late President Samuel K. Doe also fired rockets at Taylor's guerrillas.
NEWS
June 1, 1990 | From Associated Press
Rebel troops advanced to within 25 miles of the capital Thursday, and the Pentagon announced that a U.S. navy flotilla with more than 2,000 Marines is off Liberia in case American citizens need to be evacuated. Liberian President Samuel K. Doe refused to resign despite the advance of the insurgents, and he vowed to be the last person to leave the city. "Tough times never last. Tough people do," Doe told a group of foreign ambassadors, according to one envoy at the meeting.
NEWS
November 22, 1992 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Liberia's army publicly executed a soldier who was convicted of murdering a civilian he believed was a rebel. Hundreds of people watched as nine soldiers fired three rounds at the soldier, who was tied to a post. Gen. Hezekiah Bowen, the chief of staff of Liberia's armed forces, told soldiers looking on that the soldier was an example of what would happen to troops caught looting and killing.
NEWS
October 3, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The West African peacekeeping force launched heavy artillery attacks against troops of the main rebel leader, Charles Taylor, in Monrovia. Smoke hung over government buildings in the capital close to the executive mansion, from which soldiers loyal to the late President Samuel K. Doe also fired rockets at Taylor's guerrillas.
NEWS
September 29, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Several hours of heavy fighting between government troops and forces loyal to rebel leader Prince Johnson shattered a six-day cease-fire in Monrovia, the Liberian capital. Artillery and machine-gun fire shook the city before dawn as government troops fired at random from the presidential mansion. Up to 1,000 soldiers still loyal to the late President Samuel K. Doe are trapped in the mansion, between the lines of rival rebel factions.
NEWS
September 18, 1990 | From Associated Press
Liberian soldiers of slain President Samuel K. Doe on Monday doused buildings in Monrovia with gasoline and set huge fires that burned out of control, reports from the Liberian capital said. "No Doe, no Liberia! No president, no capital!" the soldiers chanted, according to British Broadcasting Corp. reports.
NEWS
August 13, 1990 | From Associated Press
Government troops mounted a successful counterattack Sunday, dashing rebel hopes of seizing the capital before a West African task force arrives to impose peace. Troops also fired on civilians, and refugees said that at least 18 were killed. Bodies of refugees and pieces of clothing from their bundles of belongings were seen scattered in the streets.
NEWS
August 1, 1990 | DAVID LAUTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Bush Administration reversed policy Tuesday and asked the United Nations to intervene to stop Liberia's slide into chaos, and officials warned of the prospect of widespread slaughter in the capital and possible starvation among thousands of refugees. Two days after government troops reportedly massacred several hundred people seeking shelter in a church, U.S. officials said that about 33,000 refugees have taken asylum at U.S. installations across Liberia, including two major U.S.
NEWS
June 12, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A major and two lieutenants of the Liberian army were arrested in the besieged capital city of Monrovia and charged with the murder of 12 people, including a township mayor. Authorities said some of the bodies had been mutilated. Leftist guerrillas now control most of the country and have been threatening Monrovia.
NEWS
July 31, 1990 | From Times Wire Services
Troops loyal to Liberian President Samuel K. Doe massacred at least 600 refugees, including babies in their mothers' arms, in the sanctuary of a church where they had fled for safety in war-torn Monrovia, witnesses said Monday. State Department officials in Washington said late Monday that their information, based on reports from U.S. Embassy staff members still in Monrovia, put the death toll closer to 200.
NEWS
July 30, 1990 | From Times staff and Wire reports
Battles raged around a radio station in Monrovia's suburbs while rebel fighters attacked government army positions in the Liberian capital. Automatic machine-gun fire clattered for several hours around the government radio station about six miles from central Monrovia. The radio station has not broadcast for several weeks, although government troops were reported still holding out there.
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