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Liberia Economy

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BUSINESS
March 10, 1988 | SCOTT KRAFT, Times Staff Writer
This tropical African nation, founded a century and a half ago by freed American slaves, has steepled Baptist churches and Southern-style houses with porches and fireplaces. The flag is red, white and blue, the U.S. dollar is legal tender and only a few years ago, a fellow named George T. Washington was ambassador to the United States. Liberia has been the closest thing to an American colony in Africa.
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BUSINESS
March 10, 1988 | SCOTT KRAFT, Times Staff Writer
This tropical African nation, founded a century and a half ago by freed American slaves, has steepled Baptist churches and Southern-style houses with porches and fireplaces. The flag is red, white and blue, the U.S. dollar is legal tender and only a few years ago, a fellow named George T. Washington was ambassador to the United States. Liberia has been the closest thing to an American colony in Africa.
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NEWS
March 5, 1987 | Associated Press
In an unusual move, the United States is sending 17 financial experts to Liberia with sweeping authority to manage that country's debt-ridden economy, State Department officials said Wednesday. Under the plan, which the Liberian government agreed to as the price of U.S. economic assistance, the American experts will form what one official characterized as a shadow economic Cabinet. The program follows substantial criticism of the way U.S.
NEWS
March 5, 1987 | Associated Press
In an unusual move, the United States is sending 17 financial experts to Liberia with sweeping authority to manage that country's debt-ridden economy, State Department officials said Wednesday. Under the plan, which the Liberian government agreed to as the price of U.S. economic assistance, the American experts will form what one official characterized as a shadow economic Cabinet. The program follows substantial criticism of the way U.S.
NEWS
January 15, 1987 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, Times Staff Writer
Secretary of State George P. Shultz bluntly told Liberian President Samuel K. Doe on Wednesday that his impoverished West African country must reform its chaotic economy and open up its political system if it hopes to see a resumption of U.S. aid. Shultz told a press conference that Liberia has already made substantial human rights progress since the bloody 1980 coup that brought Doe to power.
NEWS
July 25, 1986 | SCOTT KRAFT, Times Staff Writer
The 190-room Ducor Palace Hotel had 22 guests on a recent afternoon, no working phone lines, mismatched towels, rooms that reeked of mildew, air conditioners that exhaled hot air, a telex machine that had been out of order for at least 10 months--and more than a dozen employees with nothing much to do. The once-grand Ducor, perched atop the highest point in Monrovia, has fallen on desperately hard times.
NEWS
January 15, 1987 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, Times Staff Writer
Secretary of State George P. Shultz bluntly told Liberian President Samuel K. Doe on Wednesday that his impoverished West African country must reform its chaotic economy and open up its political system if it hopes to see a resumption of U.S. aid. Shultz told a press conference that Liberia has already made substantial human rights progress since the bloody 1980 coup that brought Doe to power.
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