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NEWS
July 25, 1997 | Associated Press
Charles Taylor, the former rebel chief who initiated Liberia's seven-year civil war, on Thursday was officially declared the winner of a presidential election. Liberia's election commission said that it had counted more than 90% of the ballots from Saturday's election and that Taylor received 75% of the vote. His closest opponent, former United Nations official Ellen Johnson-Sirleaf, received 9.5%.
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NEWS
July 25, 1997 | Associated Press
Charles Taylor, the former rebel chief who initiated Liberia's seven-year civil war, on Thursday was officially declared the winner of a presidential election. Liberia's election commission said that it had counted more than 90% of the ballots from Saturday's election and that Taylor received 75% of the vote. His closest opponent, former United Nations official Ellen Johnson-Sirleaf, received 9.5%.
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NEWS
July 20, 1997 | From Reuters
Liberia's first elections in 12 years came off peacefully Saturday, with no incidents reported by the time the polls closed at 4 p.m. Voters were choosing a president from 12 candidates and hoping for peace after seven years of civil war. They also were selecting 26 senators and 64 lower house deputies based on proportional representation. The process was monitored by more than 500 international observers, including former U.S. President Jimmy Carter.
NEWS
July 20, 1997 | From Reuters
Liberia's first elections in 12 years came off peacefully Saturday, with no incidents reported by the time the polls closed at 4 p.m. Voters were choosing a president from 12 candidates and hoping for peace after seven years of civil war. They also were selecting 26 senators and 64 lower house deputies based on proportional representation. The process was monitored by more than 500 international observers, including former U.S. President Jimmy Carter.
NEWS
May 26, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
President Samuel Doe said he is ready to step down or hold early elections under international supervision to help end a northern-based rebellion in which hundreds of Liberians have been killed. Doe made the offer at a rally the day after his forces announced their first victory against rebels: the recapture of the strategic port of Buchanan in southeastern Liberia.
NEWS
September 25, 1990 | From Reuters
Rebel leader Charles Taylor said Monday he will organize a general election in Liberia for Oct. 10, but a senior peacekeeping official scoffed at the proposal. Speaking in a radio interview with the British Broadcasting Corp., Taylor said the election would be open to opposition groups, including a breakaway rebel faction under Prince Johnson. "By Oct. 10 we hope to have all assembly members elected," Taylor said, repeating his claim to be president of the West African country.
NEWS
July 26, 1993 | Reuters
Liberia's warring factions signed a peace deal in Benin on Sunday, paving the way for multi-party elections early next year. The signing ceremony came after three days of tough negotiations on details of an accord reached last weekend in Geneva. At the ceremony, Vice President Enoch Dogolea of Charles Taylor's rebel group said his faction will observe an immediate cease-fire.
NEWS
August 17, 1993 | From Associated Press
The warring sides in Liberia's civil war formed an interim government Monday to rule until free elections can be held under the terms of a peace accord. The three main factions each chose a representative for the five-member ruling council. Two at-large members were selected by the factions from a list of three names they had nominated. The five council members, a cross-section of prominent Liberians, planned to select a president and two vice presidents from among themselves.
NEWS
June 2, 1990 | From Times Wire Services
President Samuel K. Doe, under siege from anti-government rebels, said Friday that he will not run for reelection in 1991 and appealed to the United States to help end Liberia's six-month rebellion. "I wish to announce here today my firm decision not to stand for the 1991 general elections," he told a news conference in Monrovia, the capital.
NEWS
May 6, 1996 | From Associated Press
Clouds of dark smoke billowed over this city Sunday as 2,500 Liberian refugees stood on the deck of a freighter, sadly singing a patriotic hymn and waving farewell as the ship inched away from the burning capital. Back on the streets, Monrovia was consumed by violence. Young fighters set dozens of homes and buildings on fire Sunday.
NEWS
August 17, 1993 | From Associated Press
The warring sides in Liberia's civil war formed an interim government Monday to rule until free elections can be held under the terms of a peace accord. The three main factions each chose a representative for the five-member ruling council. Two at-large members were selected by the factions from a list of three names they had nominated. The five council members, a cross-section of prominent Liberians, planned to select a president and two vice presidents from among themselves.
NEWS
July 26, 1993 | Reuters
Liberia's warring factions signed a peace deal in Benin on Sunday, paving the way for multi-party elections early next year. The signing ceremony came after three days of tough negotiations on details of an accord reached last weekend in Geneva. At the ceremony, Vice President Enoch Dogolea of Charles Taylor's rebel group said his faction will observe an immediate cease-fire.
NEWS
September 25, 1990 | From Reuters
Rebel leader Charles Taylor said Monday he will organize a general election in Liberia for Oct. 10, but a senior peacekeeping official scoffed at the proposal. Speaking in a radio interview with the British Broadcasting Corp., Taylor said the election would be open to opposition groups, including a breakaway rebel faction under Prince Johnson. "By Oct. 10 we hope to have all assembly members elected," Taylor said, repeating his claim to be president of the West African country.
NEWS
June 2, 1990 | From Times Wire Services
President Samuel K. Doe, under siege from anti-government rebels, said Friday that he will not run for reelection in 1991 and appealed to the United States to help end Liberia's six-month rebellion. "I wish to announce here today my firm decision not to stand for the 1991 general elections," he told a news conference in Monrovia, the capital.
NEWS
May 26, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
President Samuel Doe said he is ready to step down or hold early elections under international supervision to help end a northern-based rebellion in which hundreds of Liberians have been killed. Doe made the offer at a rally the day after his forces announced their first victory against rebels: the recapture of the strategic port of Buchanan in southeastern Liberia.
NEWS
September 10, 1990 | From Times Wire Services
President Samuel Doe was killed by rebels and his bullet-scarred body has been put on display at their camp outside Monrovia, news and government reports said today. Travelers returning to Monrovia told the British Broadcasting Corp. that Doe died in a rebel camp where he was taken Sunday after he was wounded and captured by rebel forces in a fierce gun battle in the capital of his war-torn West African nation. U.S. State Department officials, speaking on condition of anonymity, said U.S.
OPINION
May 1, 2005
The U.N.'s peacekeeping operation has been dogged by scandals for years. Often, as in the Bosnian town of Srebrenica a decade ago, the scandal has been the timidity of the mission. More recently, in the inaptly named Democratic Republic of the Congo, the key distinction between the undisciplined blue helmets and the roving militias is that the peacekeepers pay young girls for sex with scraps of food, while the militias simply rape. In the early 1990s, the U.N.'
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