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NEWS
August 3, 1997 | From Times Wire Reports
Former warlord Charles Taylor was sworn in as president, a position he sought for seven years on the battlefield and finally achieved at the ballot box. Two weeks after winning 75% of the vote in the nation's first postwar election, Taylor promised to immediately set up commissions aimed at guaranteeing human rights and promoting reconciliation. In 1989, he launched a civil war that devastated the West African nation.
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NEWS
August 3, 1997 | From Times Wire Reports
Former warlord Charles Taylor was sworn in as president, a position he sought for seven years on the battlefield and finally achieved at the ballot box. Two weeks after winning 75% of the vote in the nation's first postwar election, Taylor promised to immediately set up commissions aimed at guaranteeing human rights and promoting reconciliation. In 1989, he launched a civil war that devastated the West African nation.
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NEWS
July 9, 1989 | From Associated Press
The Liberian defense minister, his wife and seven other people have been accused of slaying a young policeman and using his heart and other organs in black magic rituals. The case against Maj. Gen. Gray Allison, his wife, Angeline, and the others was outlined in a three-page statement issued Friday by the justice minister of this West African nation, Jenkins Scott. The beheaded body of the victim, patrolman Melvin Pyne, was found in April on a railroad track near the general's home.
NEWS
May 9, 1996 | From Associated Press
Rival factions battled Wednesday in the streets of Monrovia, the Liberian capital, pounding one another with machine-gun fire and grenades as peace talks outside the warring country collapsed. The talks in nearby Ghana were called off after most West African leaders failed to show. Even before the cancellation, there had been doubts the summit would succeed because Liberian warlords Charles Taylor and Alhaji Kromah refused to attend. Ghanaian President Jerry J.
NEWS
January 21, 1991 | From Times Wire Services
Liberia's vice president under slain President Samuel K. Doe declared himself president Sunday and told the country's interim leader to resign. Harry Moniba fled the country in September after spending three months in hiding following attempts by him and other Liberian politicians to force Doe to resign. At a news conference in Freetown, he described the interim government of Dr.
NEWS
August 19, 1989 | From Associated Press
A military court Friday sentenced Liberia's former defense minister to death for ordering the ritual murder of a policeman so his blood could be used in an attempted coup against President Samuel K. Doe. Doe must approve the sentence against Maj. Gen. Gray Allison, which would be carried out by firing squad. Maj. Gen. Kpenkrah Konah, chairman of the court-martial board, told Allison: "The court in closed session and upon secret ballot, has found you guilty of the charge of murder."
NEWS
July 4, 1990 | From Times Wire Services
Embattled President Samuel K. Doe has agreed in principle to resign, political sources said Tuesday. Rebels battled government troops in the capital's suburbs. The sources, who spoke on condition of anonymity, said Doe agreed to step down only on the condition that his safety and that of his minority Krahn tribe are guaranteed.
NEWS
June 2, 1990 | From Times Wire Services
President Samuel K. Doe, under siege from anti-government rebels, said Friday that he will not run for reelection in 1991 and appealed to the United States to help end Liberia's six-month rebellion. "I wish to announce here today my firm decision not to stand for the 1991 general elections," he told a news conference in Monrovia, the capital.
NEWS
May 9, 1996 | From Associated Press
Rival factions battled Wednesday in the streets of Monrovia, the Liberian capital, pounding one another with machine-gun fire and grenades as peace talks outside the warring country collapsed. The talks in nearby Ghana were called off after most West African leaders failed to show. Even before the cancellation, there had been doubts the summit would succeed because Liberian warlords Charles Taylor and Alhaji Kromah refused to attend. Ghanaian President Jerry J.
NEWS
June 10, 1990 | Associated Press
Liberian President Samuel K. Doe, his capital under siege by rebel soldiers, has retained a Washington lobbyist for $800,000 to represent his interests here. Doe hired Van Kloberg & Associates starting June 1. The firm's owner, Edward van Kloberg, flew to Monrovia last week to finalize the deal, a spokesman said. "Doe doesn't need public relations right now, obviously," spokesman Mike Hogan said.
NEWS
January 21, 1991 | From Times Wire Services
Liberia's vice president under slain President Samuel K. Doe declared himself president Sunday and told the country's interim leader to resign. Harry Moniba fled the country in September after spending three months in hiding following attempts by him and other Liberian politicians to force Doe to resign. At a news conference in Freetown, he described the interim government of Dr.
NEWS
July 4, 1990 | From Times Wire Services
Embattled President Samuel K. Doe has agreed in principle to resign, political sources said Tuesday. Rebels battled government troops in the capital's suburbs. The sources, who spoke on condition of anonymity, said Doe agreed to step down only on the condition that his safety and that of his minority Krahn tribe are guaranteed.
NEWS
July 3, 1990 | From Times Wire Services
Rebels aiming to overthrow President Samuel K. Doe attacked Monrovia in a two-pronged offensive Monday, cutting all major land routes out of the Liberian capital. The action forced Doe to retreat, apparently for a last stand inside his heavily fortified residence. People streamed out of the center of the shuttered and barred city as the guerrillas closed in. Heavy automatic gunfire and artillery fire erupted in the eastern and western suburbs.
NEWS
June 10, 1990 | Associated Press
Liberian President Samuel K. Doe, his capital under siege by rebel soldiers, has retained a Washington lobbyist for $800,000 to represent his interests here. Doe hired Van Kloberg & Associates starting June 1. The firm's owner, Edward van Kloberg, flew to Monrovia last week to finalize the deal, a spokesman said. "Doe doesn't need public relations right now, obviously," spokesman Mike Hogan said.
NEWS
June 2, 1990 | From Times Wire Services
President Samuel K. Doe, under siege from anti-government rebels, said Friday that he will not run for reelection in 1991 and appealed to the United States to help end Liberia's six-month rebellion. "I wish to announce here today my firm decision not to stand for the 1991 general elections," he told a news conference in Monrovia, the capital.
NEWS
June 2, 1990 | JOHN M. BRODER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Liberian rebellion that threatens to overthrow the 10-year regime of Samuel K. Doe is led by Charles McArthur Taylor, a self-described "church-going Christian" who wears a magic amulet around his neck to ward off bullets. Taylor calls himself a "die-hard capitalist" who wants only to restore democracy, honor and Christian values to Liberia after a decade of corruption under Doe. But U.S.
NEWS
July 3, 1990 | From Times Wire Services
Rebels aiming to overthrow President Samuel K. Doe attacked Monrovia in a two-pronged offensive Monday, cutting all major land routes out of the Liberian capital. The action forced Doe to retreat, apparently for a last stand inside his heavily fortified residence. People streamed out of the center of the shuttered and barred city as the guerrillas closed in. Heavy automatic gunfire and artillery fire erupted in the eastern and western suburbs.
NEWS
June 2, 1990 | JOHN M. BRODER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Liberian rebellion that threatens to overthrow the 10-year regime of Samuel K. Doe is led by Charles McArthur Taylor, a self-described "church-going Christian" who wears a magic amulet around his neck to ward off bullets. Taylor calls himself a "die-hard capitalist" who wants only to restore democracy, honor and Christian values to Liberia after a decade of corruption under Doe. But U.S.
NEWS
August 19, 1989 | From Associated Press
A military court Friday sentenced Liberia's former defense minister to death for ordering the ritual murder of a policeman so his blood could be used in an attempted coup against President Samuel K. Doe. Doe must approve the sentence against Maj. Gen. Gray Allison, which would be carried out by firing squad. Maj. Gen. Kpenkrah Konah, chairman of the court-martial board, told Allison: "The court in closed session and upon secret ballot, has found you guilty of the charge of murder."
NEWS
July 22, 1989 | MICHAEL A. HILTZIK, Times Staff Writer
Many people here were struck by two things when Defense Minister Gray D. Allison was arrested and charged in June with having made a human sacrifice to further his career. They thought Allison was paying the price of plotting a coup against President Samuel K. Doe. And they thought he was almost certainly guilty. The latter assumption had only a little to do with the public's deep loathing for Maj. Gen. Allison.
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