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September 10, 1990 | RICHARD E. MEYER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A rebel group Sunday captured President Samuel K. Doe of Liberia, a State Department official said, adding that U.S. observers believe Doe was wounded during a fierce gun battle in Monrovia. "Our embassy has confirmed that he was captured," said the official, who asked not to be identified. Reports reaching Washington said that Doe was taken into custody by rebel Prince Yormie Johnson, who declared himself in charge of Liberia. The reports said Doe was wounded in both legs.
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NEWS
April 4, 1999 | DEAN E. MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"S-TEC! The fruit of life! Learning on God's grace! In union, success we assure! We all attend!" The thunderous chant of the school ode at the Salayea Technical Education Center served as a warmup for the afternoon's big event: the first graduation exercises that this dusty town of erstwhile war refugees has witnessed in a decade. Auto department! Carpentry department! Masonry department! Metalwork department!
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NEWS
August 8, 1990 | MICHAEL A. HILTZIK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Prince Johnson, one of two rebel leaders besieging the capital of Liberia, threatened Tuesday to attack a detachment of U.S. Marines unless the United States or another foreign country intervenes to halt the Liberian civil war. At the same time, a group of West African countries announced that they will send a joint military force into Liberia in an effort to end the conflict and set up an interim government. There was no indication of when the multilateral force will be organized.
NEWS
September 23, 1998 | From Times Wire Reports
Dozens of people died in a two-day spasm of gun battles in the capital, Monrovia, over the weekend after soldiers tried to arrest former Liberian warlord Roosevelt Johnson, who took refuge in the U.S. Embassy. Just days after the shooting died down, much appeared normal in the disarmingly relaxed seaside town. President Charles Taylor has promised that the U.S. Embassy will not come under attack. As stores reopened and people returned to work, platoons of soldiers headed to their barracks.
NEWS
July 31, 1990 | From Times Wire Services
Troops loyal to Liberian President Samuel K. Doe massacred at least 600 refugees, including babies in their mothers' arms, in the sanctuary of a church where they had fled for safety in war-torn Monrovia, witnesses said Monday. State Department officials in Washington said late Monday that their information, based on reports from U.S. Embassy staff members still in Monrovia, put the death toll closer to 200.
NEWS
November 1, 1992 | ROBIN WRIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Five American nuns engaged in humanitarian work in Liberia have been murdered, probably by rebels fighting one of Africa's grisliest wars, the State Department confirmed Saturday. The five, members of the Adorers of the Blood of Christ who had been missing for more than a week, were shot in two separate incidents, according to Roman Catholic Archbishop Michael Francis of Monrovia, the Liberian capital.
NEWS
May 15, 1996 | BOB DROGIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Gen. Butt Naked, a youthful commander with a self-given nom de guerre, charges into battle each day stark nude except for a pair of boots. His men are allowed to wear underpants. Not far away, Gen. George Bush and Gen. Saddam Hussein command fighters who sometimes attack with such weapons as butter knives, golf clubs, tennis rackets and soldering irons. One youth even uses a can of insecticide.
NEWS
November 29, 1990 | From Associated Press
Liberian rebels signed a cease-fire agreement Wednesday, but a West African summit ended without a clear-cut political settlement to the country's 11-month civil war. Rebel leader Charles Taylor embraced some of his bitterest enemies after accepting an immediate cease-fire. The ceremony was hailed as a breakthrough by leaders at the summit of the Economic Community of West African States.
NEWS
April 8, 1996 | From Times Wire Reports
Liberians in Monrovia, the capital, fled their homes or holed up in army barracks as the worst fighting in the West African city in more than three years raged between government troops and rebels. The fighting began Saturday morning as government troops tried to drive deposed warlord Roosevelt Johnson from his home in an eastern suburb. Johnson, recently fired as minister of rural development, is wanted on murder charges stemming from clashes that killed several people in the capital last week.
NEWS
April 23, 1996 | From Times Wire Reports
A U.S. delegation arrived in Monrovia to add its weight to efforts to bring a lasting peace after two weeks of fighting. Residents of the capital started returning home and cleaning up, while health workers battled to contain outbreaks of a disease thought to be cholera. Officials say the three-member U.S. delegation plans to stay until Thursday and meet the main players in the peace process.
NEWS
October 13, 1996 | Associated Press
Health officials were to begin exhuming bodies this weekend from dozens of mass graves north of the capital to check reports that they contain 2,000 victims of starvation and factional fighting. A Health Ministry team was heading Saturday to Tubmanburg, 50 miles north of Monrovia, to investigate reports by a local charity, Concerned Christian Community, that about 2,000 people have died since July.
NEWS
May 24, 1996 | From Times Wire Reports
A West African peacekeeper was killed in a clash with gunmen at the port in Liberia's capital, Monrovia, during a dispute over a looted car, witnesses said. In the city center and around the Mamba Point diplomatic quarter, rival factions fought street battles for the fourth successive day. Relative calm returned later. Up to 20,000 civilians have taken refuge in a U.S. Embassy annex, the Greystone Compound, which is often caught in the cross-fire.
NEWS
May 19, 1996 | From Reuters
Fresh shooting broke out here in Liberia's capital Saturday after the government called for a truce to enable West African peacekeepers to make the city once more a safe haven. Peacekeepers moved tanks onto one of two key bridges in the city, and witnesses reported them clearing fighters and civilians from the Vai Town area between the bridges and the port.
NEWS
May 16, 1996 | From Associated Press
Sporadic gunfire was reported Wednesday around the U.S. Embassy in Monrovia, a day after heavy fighting in the seaside district interrupted a brief lull in Liberia's civil war. Meanwhile, about 1,850 refugees from an overcrowded freighter that docked in neighboring Ghana after 10 days at sea were receiving aid and medical care Wednesday in the port of Takoradi. Earlier reports that 3,000 to 4,000 refugees were crowded on board the ship proved to be untrue. The U.N.
NEWS
May 15, 1996 | BOB DROGIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Gen. Butt Naked, a youthful commander with a self-given nom de guerre, charges into battle each day stark nude except for a pair of boots. His men are allowed to wear underpants. Not far away, Gen. George Bush and Gen. Saddam Hussein command fighters who sometimes attack with such weapons as butter knives, golf clubs, tennis rackets and soldering irons. One youth even uses a can of insecticide.
NEWS
May 14, 1996 | From Associated Press
A rusty freighter seeking a port of refuge for thousands of sick and weary Liberian refugees fleeing factional fighting was forced out to sea yet again Monday after restocking urgently needed food and medical supplies in Ghana. Ghanaian authorities would not let the 3,000 to 4,000 refugees disembark, although eight seriously ill people were allowed off. Two of them were hospitalized in critical condition.
NEWS
April 20, 1996 | From Times Wire Reports
A rebel Liberian faction whose showdown with a rival plunged Monrovia, the capital, into chaos agreed to a cease-fire and freed 78 foreigners trapped by the fighting. The foreigners' release was the strongest sign yet that the new truce might halt two weeks of fighting that prompted a U.S. military evacuation of more than 2,000 foreigners. U.S. Ambassador William Milan said a delegation from Roosevelt Johnson's Ulimo faction accepted the peace plan during talks at the U.S. Embassy.
NEWS
February 15, 1994 | Reuters
Thousands of refugees have fled fighting between two Liberian rebel groups and are now crammed into the port of Buchanan, relief workers said. Between 6,000 and 7,000 people are squeezed into the port's two-story Louisa Hotel. Others have taken over homes abandoned earlier by residents who are now returning to find them occupied.
NEWS
May 13, 1996 | From Times Wire Reports
A freighter with thousands of refugees fleeing war in Liberia was forced back to sea after passengers were fed and given medical care in Ghana, port officials said. Medical workers said they found two bodies from a shooting incident on the freighter, which docked in Ghana after a week at sea with no port willing to admit the refugees. Details of the shooting incident were not clear.
NEWS
May 12, 1996 | From Times Wire Services
Liberians fleeing their country's civil war aboard a damaged freighter will not be allowed entry into Ghana, U.N. and Ghanaian officials said Saturday. "Only Ghanaians, U.N. officials, aid workers and foreign nationals seeking transit through Ghana will be allowed to disembark," the U.N. refugee agency's representative in Accra, Chrysantus Ache, told Ghana News Agency.
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