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Liberia Revolts

NEWS
September 10, 1996 | From Times Wire Reports
Aid workers provided about 4,000 children the first food aid they had received in seven months, after reaching a city that had been cut off by fighting among rival militias. Relief officials reached the city of Tubmanburg, about 35 miles north of Monrovia, the capital, on Saturday and found that at least 60% of the 35,000 residents were suffering from severe malnutrition.
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NEWS
February 15, 1994 | Reuters
Thousands of refugees have fled fighting between two Liberian rebel groups and are now crammed into the port of Buchanan, relief workers said. Between 6,000 and 7,000 people are squeezed into the port's two-story Louisa Hotel. Others have taken over homes abandoned earlier by residents who are now returning to find them occupied.
NEWS
November 3, 1992 | MICHAEL A. HILTZIK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Monrovia's Roman Catholic archbishop demanded on Monday that rebel leader Charles Taylor and his forces release for burial the bodies of five American nuns and four Liberian novices whose killings were reported over the weekend. "We hold Mr. Taylor responsible, directly or indirectly, consciously or unconsciously, for the deaths of these . . . lovely people," Archbishop Michael Francis told an audience at a memorial for the nuns in Monrovia.
NEWS
October 25, 1992
Rebels retreated Saturday under a bombardment of shells, rockets and mortars fired by a West African peacekeeping force. Tens of thousands of people fled their homes because of the fighting near the capital. Dozens of civilians caught in the cross-fire were injured, and an unknown number were killed, doctors said. The chief of staff of the West African army, Brig. Victor Malu of Nigeria, said rebels suffered heavy casualties but refused to discuss his own losses.
NEWS
September 12, 1992 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Rebel leader Charles Taylor agreed to release 500 West African peacekeeping force soldiers after meeting former President Jimmy Carter. The West African forces have been monitoring a cease-fire in the nation's civil war since 1990. Earlier in the week, West African commanders said the peacekeepers were being harassed by Taylor's fighters and ordered them to withdraw.
NEWS
August 14, 1990 | MICHAEL A. HILTZIK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The News: Five West African nations are sending a military task force to Liberia in a regional effort to end that country's seven-month civil war, which has cost more than 5,000 lives and turned 400,000 persons into refugees. Nigeria, Guinea, Sierra Leone, Ghana, and Togo--all, ironically, headed by military governments and operating under the banner of the Economic Community of West African States--are commiting troops to a task force totaling some 2,500 men.
NEWS
August 11, 1990 | From Times Wire Services
Competing Liberian rebel groups advanced on two fronts against President Samuel K. Doe's executive mansion Friday, and one group claimed it narrowly missed killing him in an ambush. Rebels led by Prince Johnson fortified positions in Monrovia's city center while men under command of his rival, Charles Taylor, advanced in the capital's eastern suburbs. Both groups were maneuvering in a last-ditch bid to topple Doe before West African peacekeepers arrive to impose a cease-fire.
NEWS
August 26, 1990 | From Associated Press
Fighting broke out Saturday between rebels loyal to Charles Taylor and a West African task force sent to Monrovia to end Liberia's 8-month-old civil war, the Ghana news agency reported. The agency, which sent a reporter along with the five-nation force, said the troops had advanced from the capital's port area toward the city center. The 3,000 soldiers were welcomed upon arrival at the port Friday night by Taylor's rival rebel chief, Prince Johnson.
NEWS
June 7, 1990 | From Times Wire Services
Rebel troops continued to bear down on the Liberian capital Wednesday, and U.S. officials said they are arranging special flights to evacuate Americans. The flights, to begin Saturday, will allow several hundred American citizens to leave Liberia because of the deteriorating situation, U.S. officials in Washington said. The State Department is strongly urging the estimated 2,000 Americans in this West African nation to leave. Several miles off Monrovia, four U.S.
NEWS
June 17, 1990 | From Times staff and Wire reports
Talks between the Liberian government and rebels on a cease-fire in the six-month-old civil war broke down, but both sides agreed to return to talk again in Freetown, Sierra Leone, on June 25. Negotiators did not specify on what points the talks broke down, but they are reported to have agreed their troops should use restraint, even though fighting will resume. Food aid into the war zone reportedly will continue unhindered.
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