Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsLibertarian Party California
IN THE NEWS

Libertarian Party California

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
October 8, 1989 | DAVID FERRELL, Times Staff Writer
Scarcely a week after the largest cocaine bust in history, outspoken Libertarians called Saturday for another tack in the drug war--the legalization of all banned substances. Hoisting hand-painted picket signs declaring, "Let Them Smoke Pot," "My Urine Is Mine" and "Say No to Drugs AND to Big Brother," about 60 members of the anti-government political party demonstrated Saturday for more than an hour outside the Federal Building in Westwood.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
January 21, 1999 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Steve Kubby, the 1998 Libertarian candidate for governor of California, and his wife are expected to be arraigned today on suspicion of cultivating about 300 marijuana plants at their home, officials said. Kubby, 52, and his wife, Michele, 32, were arrested Tuesday when police raided their home near Lake Tahoe. They were booked at Placer County Jail on suspicion of unauthorized cultivation, harvesting and processing of marijuana, possession with intent to sell, and conspiracy.
Advertisement
NEWS
May 13, 1988 | ROBERT W. STEWART, Times Staff Writer
The backers of Proposition 77, which would authorize a $150-million bond issue to repair substandard housing and strengthen apartment buildings prone to earthquake damage, argue that the measure is a prudent investment in California's future. "This proposition . . . will protect us from extraordinary losses" when the inevitable "Big One" shakes the state, said Assemblyman Dominic L. Cortese (D-San Jose), one of the measure's sponsors.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 5, 1992 | DAVID COLKER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
First of all, no matter how badly candidates were clobbered by the voters, all their post-election parties are called "victory" parties. Second, losing big means you can get to bed early. And then, the fewer the votes, the more important it is symbolically to have taken part, to sink beneath the waves of an uncaring electorate with flag still flying, perhaps having made a few converts. These are the lessons learned when visiting gatherings for the big losers on election night.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 5, 1992 | DAVID COLKER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
First of all, no matter how badly candidates were clobbered by the voters, all their post-election parties are called "victory" parties. Second, losing big means you can get to bed early. And then, the fewer the votes, the more important it is symbolically to have taken part, to sink beneath the waves of an uncaring electorate with flag still flying, perhaps having made a few converts. These are the lessons learned when visiting gatherings for the big losers on election night.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 28, 1991 | CARLOS V. LOZANO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Shortly after Sandi Webb was elected to the Simi Valley City Council in November, Mayor Greg Stratton was asked his opinion about how Webb's Libertarian Party affiliation might affect her vote on city issues. "Well, I don't think she is going to try and abolish the City Council or anything," he joked. Webb laughed when told of the mayor's comments during a recent interview. She said her goal is not to eliminate government but "to make things run a little smoother for people."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 28, 1992 | SAM ENRIQUEZ
Two minor-party candidates and a campaign manager staged a brief protest Wednesday at The Times' plant in Chatsworth against what they said was the newspaper's limited campaign coverage. "We are qualified candidates, and what we do is news," said Glenn Bailey, the Green Party candidate in the 20th State Senate District race. "But we haven't had coverage by The Times at any of our public appearances."
NEWS
October 22, 1990 | DEAN MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When Jerome McCready walks into a restaurant and proclaims that he will be the next governor of California--as he is inclined to do these days--dinner service doesn't exactly come to a halt. "Some people think at first that it is a joke," said McCready, a deep-voiced licensed Baptist minister who works as a maintenance supervisor for an apartment company. "But I wear a button with my picture on it, and it is a rather expensive button. It costs two bucks apiece.
NEWS
January 21, 1999 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Steve Kubby, the 1998 Libertarian candidate for governor of California, and his wife are expected to be arraigned today on suspicion of cultivating about 300 marijuana plants at their home, officials said. Kubby, 52, and his wife, Michele, 32, were arrested Tuesday when police raided their home near Lake Tahoe. They were booked at Placer County Jail on suspicion of unauthorized cultivation, harvesting and processing of marijuana, possession with intent to sell, and conspiracy.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 4, 1990
I would like to congratulate the students and teachers of Willow Elementary School in Glendora for their wonderful contributions to save rain forests in Central America ("Pennies for the Planet," Metro, April 25). It is truly gratifying to see young children learning free market solutions to ecological problems instead of the typical coercive solutions pressed by many environmental activists and government officials. Organizations like the Nature Conservancy and students like those at Willow Elementary School give me great hope for the future of our planet.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 28, 1992 | SAM ENRIQUEZ
Two minor-party candidates and a campaign manager staged a brief protest Wednesday at The Times' plant in Chatsworth against what they said was the newspaper's limited campaign coverage. "We are qualified candidates, and what we do is news," said Glenn Bailey, the Green Party candidate in the 20th State Senate District race. "But we haven't had coverage by The Times at any of our public appearances."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 28, 1991 | CARLOS V. LOZANO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Shortly after Sandi Webb was elected to the Simi Valley City Council in November, Mayor Greg Stratton was asked his opinion about how Webb's Libertarian Party affiliation might affect her vote on city issues. "Well, I don't think she is going to try and abolish the City Council or anything," he joked. Webb laughed when told of the mayor's comments during a recent interview. She said her goal is not to eliminate government but "to make things run a little smoother for people."
NEWS
October 22, 1990 | DEAN MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When Jerome McCready walks into a restaurant and proclaims that he will be the next governor of California--as he is inclined to do these days--dinner service doesn't exactly come to a halt. "Some people think at first that it is a joke," said McCready, a deep-voiced licensed Baptist minister who works as a maintenance supervisor for an apartment company. "But I wear a button with my picture on it, and it is a rather expensive button. It costs two bucks apiece.
NEWS
October 8, 1989 | DAVID FERRELL, Times Staff Writer
Scarcely a week after the largest cocaine bust in history, outspoken Libertarians called Saturday for another tack in the drug war--the legalization of all banned substances. Hoisting hand-painted picket signs declaring, "Let Them Smoke Pot," "My Urine Is Mine" and "Say No to Drugs AND to Big Brother," about 60 members of the anti-government political party demonstrated Saturday for more than an hour outside the Federal Building in Westwood.
NEWS
May 13, 1988 | ROBERT W. STEWART, Times Staff Writer
The backers of Proposition 77, which would authorize a $150-million bond issue to repair substandard housing and strengthen apartment buildings prone to earthquake damage, argue that the measure is a prudent investment in California's future. "This proposition . . . will protect us from extraordinary losses" when the inevitable "Big One" shakes the state, said Assemblyman Dominic L. Cortese (D-San Jose), one of the measure's sponsors.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 21, 1991
I am appalled and embarrassed that Llewellyn Rockwell identifies himself as a libertarian ("It's Safe Streets Versus Urban Terror," Column Right, Commentary, March 10). There is nothing Libertarian about the notion that police are empowered to act as judge, jury and dispenser of punishment. What becomes apparent from viewing the beating of Rodney King is that if the police had felt threatened by his "resistance" to arrest, they had sufficient numbers to restrain him with handcuffs.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 16, 1991
Regarding the San Fernando City Council's plan to crack down on street vendors, I would like to remind the council that: Buyers can observe sanitary conditions before they purchase food. Licenses don't ensure anything except that the city has revenue. Price fixing, even by ensuring that everyone has the same overhead costs, is considered immoral and illegal. And, most important, if and when too many vendors roam the streets, each will sell fewer products and some will quit to do more profitable things.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|