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OPINION
November 15, 1998
Re "Cybraries," Nov. 9 (Orange County) and Nov. 10: Having just returned from addressing the New England Law Library Consortium, may I raise another issue for the millennium: the role of specialized librarians in specific fields. With Internet access available for professionals, legal librarians are now challenged to rethink their traditional role in law firms and law schools. One possibility for the future: librarians as directors of competitive research. Specialized libraries might also use their ability to distill a glut of information into viable knowledge and sell it to organizations and even developing nations.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 24, 2014 | Karolina Waclawiak
Haunted people wander through cul-de-sacs reeling from small-scale catastrophes or pace through Parisienne arrondissements wishing for different lives in Elizabeth McCracken's "Thunderstruck and Other Stories. " Her second fiction story collection is a stunningly beautiful rumination on loss. "You are so unlucky you don't want to brush up against anyone who isn't," a narrator laments in "Something Amazing. " Sadness is an infection, an allergen, a communicable disease, passing from mother to mother as children are lost or die. McCracken's vapor of misfortune threads around her characters and binds them.
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OPINION
October 11, 2009 | Amy Goldman Koss, Amy Goldman Koss is the author, most recently, of the teen novel "Side Effects."
You sit down to write a novel, and soon the characters are crowding around demanding attention with the urgency and self-obsession of 3-year-olds. A few weeks in, and you can no longer shake them. In fact, nothing shuts them up until the manuscript is ripped from your hands on deadline, when you go from total control to utter powerlessness with one click of the Send button. Goodbye! Good luck! After that comes the weird silence of the empty nest, with its combination of freedom and loneliness.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 9, 2014 | Teresa Watanabe and Stephen Ceasar
Disadvantaged students in L.A. Unified stand to benefit from a multimillion-dollar infusion for more tutoring, counselors, English language coaches, nurses, librarians and other support under a budget plan presented Tuesday. In the opening salvo in a two-month process under the state's new school finance system, L.A. schools Supt. John Deasy presented the district's first detailed blueprint for spending $837 million specifically aimed at boosting services for students who are low-income, learning English and in foster care.
OPINION
May 18, 2011 | By Nora Murphy
Soon after I became a school librarian, a teacher came to me about Mario, an eighth-grader who had never read an entire book. Mario struggled to read at all, and English was not his first language, but he was a bright kid whose teacher believed in him. I recommended a short, funny, mysterious book that appeals to reluctant boy readers. Mario took it home, read it in a week and came back with his friends in tow to check out the remaining titles in the series. When he was ready to tackle more challenging content, I started him listening to audiobooks while following along in the text, a strategy helpful for building fluency and comprehension.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 13, 2011 | Hector Tobar
In a basement downtown, the librarians are being interrogated. On most days, they work in middle schools and high schools operated by the Los Angeles Unified School District, fielding student queries about American history and Greek mythology, and retrieving copies of vampire novels. But this week, you'll find them in a makeshift LAUSD courtroom set up on the bare concrete floor of a building on East 9th Street. Several sit in plastic chairs, watching from an improvised gallery as their fellow librarians are questioned.
NEWS
June 5, 1986
Two groups of reference librarians formerly housed at the fire-damaged Los Angeles Central Library have found new quarters at the UCLA Library, university librarian Russell Shank announced. Nine staff members of the Southern California Answering Network are working in offices in the university's research library and six staff members of the Metropolitan Cooperative Library System are being housed at the Powell library.
OPINION
October 26, 2011 | By Regina Powers
California paid for my master's degree in library and information science. While I am grateful to have had the grant and the opportunity to go back to school, I wish now that I had instead trained to be an electrician, a plumber or an auto mechanic. California does not value librarians. Other states employ an average of one public librarian to 6,250 patrons. As of last year, 3,432 full-time librarians served 37,253,956 Californians. In other words, California librarians were each expected to serve 10,854 patrons.
NEWS
May 12, 1985
As both a librarian and a teacher I'm upset and dismayed that USC has decided to close its graduate School of Library Science, one of the better ones in the country. This move seems to be part of a nationwide trend based on the assumption that with the development of computers to retrieve information, librarians will become increasingly less necessary. I believe this assumption is wrong, and detrimental to education and the business of information retrieval. Key words in education are "equal access to information."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 15, 2001
Re "Some Overdue Attention," editorial, June 11: Forget White House book fairs and task forces on diversity. The simple solution to the librarian shortage is adequate compensation. City of Los Angeles librarian recruits must possess a master's degree in library and information science, and many have experience as librarians. Yet the city offers them a paltry starting pay of $33,500 to work evenings and weekends with an increasingly quarrelsome public. These information-savvy prospects naturally choose to work for high-tech companies that compensate them in proportion to their education and skills.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 25, 2014 | By Patrick McGreevy
SACRAMENTO -- Librarians aren't known for being loud, but Gov. Jerry Brown might hear some raised voices from that scholarly crowd over his decision Tuesday to appoint a politically connected journalist as the California state librarian. Brown appointed Greg Lucas, 55, a former political reporter for the San Francisco Chronicle, to the post. Since 2011, Lucas has been a senior editor for the Sacramento website Capitol Weekly, which provides articles on California politics, and he also writes and edits California's Capitol, a website he created that also explores issues of state politics and history.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 25, 2014 | By Patrick McGreevy
SACRAMENTO - Librarians aren't known for being loud, but Gov. Jerry Brown may hear some raised voices from that scholarly crowd over his decision Tuesday to appoint a politically connected journalist as the state librarian. Greg Lucas, 55, is a former political reporter for the San Francisco Chronicle. Since 2011, he has been a senior editor for the Sacramento website Capitol Weekly, which covers California politics, and he writes and edits California's Capitol, a website he created that also delves into politics.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 7, 2013 | By Paresh Dave
After each school day, librarian Dinora Arteaga leads a special reading program for a dozen kindergarten and first-grade students, along with their parents. Their goal: learning 10 new words a week. Arteaga works almost exclusively with Spanish-speaking parents whose children are struggling to read, either in Spanish or English. Operating out of a tiny library at Evelyn Thurman Gratts Primary Center, a public charter school near downtown, her group meets on Mondays, with one-on-one sessions later in the week.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 5, 2013 | By Richard Winton
L.A. County prosecutors have charged 13 employees in four of the region's most financially strapped school districts with stealing thousands of textbooks for a book buyer, who allegedly paid them $200,000 in bribes. A 37-page indictment unsealed Thursday tells of a book-selling scheme in which book buyer Corey Frederick recruited two librarians, a campus supervisor and a former warehouse manager, among others, to allegedly steal thousands of books from schools in Los Angeles, Inglewood and Bellflower.
OPINION
April 30, 2013
Re "Lawsuit: State fails some English learners," April 25 The article does not mention two approaches to help those acquiring English, both with substantial research support. One is bilingual education, dismantled by Proposition 227 more than a decade ago. Research has shown that students in bilingual programs outperform students in all-English programs on tests of English reading. Also, studies show that Proposition 227 did not result in improved English proficiency. Second, there is strong evidence that those who do more pleasure reading in English do better on English-language tests, and case histories reveal that those who succeeded in acquiring the English needed for school were dedicated readers.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 22, 2013 | By Hugo Martín, Los Angeles Times
Is it any surprise that on a warm spring day, thousands of Southern Californians went in search of a good book - and a chance to meet the person who wrote it? Not to Susan Burton, a retired school librarian from Fontana, who was among the crowds that converged Sunday morning on the USC campus for the final day of the Los Angeles Times Festival of Books. "I think this is a fabulous place to be," she said as she stood in line with a friend to hear a discussion about crime writing with former L.A. Deputy Dist.
BUSINESS
August 17, 1995 | GARY CHAPMAN, Gary Chapman is the director of the 21st Century Project at the University of Texas at Austin
In the 1957 movie "Desk Set," Katharine Hepburn played a research librarian for a fictional television network and Spencer Tracy played a computer systems engineer who sets up a room-sized computer that the librarians fear will eliminate their jobs. A telephone call comes asking whether the King of the Watusis owns an automobile. The question is fed into the computer, and out comes a lengthy movie review of "King Solomon's Mines."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 15, 1996 | RUSS LOAR, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Lucille Cruz works in frontier territory as head of the county's smallest public library, a storefront branch of the county library system just a few miles north of the "Pig Crossing" sign in rural Silverado Canyon. Most library patrons--and some of their dogs--are on a first-name basis with Cruz, 41, who has managed the 1,100-square-foot branch for the last 17 years. Lacey, an affable canine who often stops by the branch, is one of her best customers.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 19, 2012 | By Bob Pool, Los Angeles Times
The discovery that real estate agent Matthew Greenberg made when he stepped inside a Mount Washington cottage will put the Los Angeles Public Library on the map. Stashed everywhere in the 948-square-foot tear-down were maps. Tens of thousands of maps. Fold-out street maps were stuffed in file cabinets, crammed into cardboard boxes, lined up on closet shelves and jammed into old dairy crates. Wall-size roll-up maps once familiar to schoolchildren were stacked in corners. Old globes were lined in rows atop bookshelves also filled with maps and atlases.
BUSINESS
October 14, 2012 | By Ken Bensinger, Los Angeles Times
The gig: As newly appointed city librarian of the Los Angeles Public Library, John Szabo runs the nation's largest public-funded library system, measured by population served. From his corner office atop the Central Library in downtown L.A., the 44-year-old oversees the city's 72 branches, 6.4 million volumes, 3 million photographs, 30,000 electronic volumes and 883 employees. Appointed by Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa in June, he reported for duty Aug. 20. A "library person": For some, it takes decades to find their life's calling.
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