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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 22, 1998 | JEAN O. PASCO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Orange County officials plan to warn parents that children who log on to the Information Superhighway at their public libraries could be headed for the Internet's red-light districts. On Tuesday, Orange County Librarian John Adams will tell county supervisors about the library's new policy of requiring written parental permission before minors can sign on to the Internet at library computers. The policy will take effect July 1.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
July 31, 2001 | EDWIN CHEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
First Lady Laura Bush, a former teacher and school librarian who crusades for early reading skills, is creating a fund-raising foundation to help libraries buy books, the White House announced Monday. "My lifelong passion for books and reading began when I was a little girl," Mrs. Bush said. "This new foundation provides yet another opportunity to share with America's children the magical world of books and reading."
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BUSINESS
April 26, 1990 | MICHAEL SCHRAGE
Pop Quiz/Short Essay (50 points): Which individual has had the greatest positive impact on the quality of American education in this century? John Dewey? The sentimental choice but not a contender. Columbia University's Nicholas Murray Butler, Harvard University's James Bryant Conant or the University of Chicago's Robert Hutchins? Giants of their time, for sure, but their influence today is but a nostalgic echo. Joan Ganz Cooney of "Sesame Street"? Maybe Captain Kangaroo? Just kidding.
NEWS
February 25, 2001 | JILL LEOVY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Guillermo Sheridan had a bitter smile as he scrolled down the list of acquisitions by Princeton University: The papers of Carlos Fuentes, Miguel Angel Asturias, Julio Cortazar, Elena Garro--even a lesser known Mexican poet named Bernardo Ortiz de Montellano. "We Mexicans always sell our raw materials," he remarked acidly, stopping at Ortiz's name on his computer screen. "Coffee, copper--and this."
NEWS
November 15, 1988
The FBI agreed to sharply restrict its program of seeking out Soviet agents among specialized library users in New York City but said it will continue to contact libraries elsewhere when it suspects hostile intelligence operatives may be using them for espionage. In a letter released by Rep. Don Edwards (D-San Jose), a critic of the FBI program, FBI Director William S.
NEWS
February 1, 1997 | MARY CURTIUS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Billed as the crown jewel of a civic renaissance, this city's New Main library opened just over nine months ago to national acclaim for its daring architecture and bold embrace of technology. Gleaming in marble splendor within the Civic Center, the New Main was hailed as a model public library for the 21st century.
NEWS
June 23, 1997 | STEVE EMMONS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Things used to be simpler at the public library. You'd go to the card catalog, look up "Bambi" and find a storybook about a baby deer. Nowadays you go to the library's Internet terminal, type in "Bambi" and get more than 9,000 references--from "Tammy's Home Page" where "Thumper and Flower come out to play" to "Bambi--one of our hot Cyber Sex Toys Play Things!!! Win a FREE call!!"
BUSINESS
August 5, 1998 | Associated Press
Charges on telephone bills to pay for cheap Internet hookups for schools and libraries could constitute an illegal tax, casting additional uncertainty over the politically touchy program, according to some of the House's top tax lawmakers. The House Ways and Means Committee's oversight subcommittee held a hearing on the matter, which is before a federal appeals court in New Orleans.
NEWS
March 12, 1990 | LARRY GREEN and TRACY SHRYER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The biggest, most expensive municipal library building in America--a $175-million, block-square, 10-story bibliophiles' palace--will open in Chicago late next year with just one flaw: Books will be in short supply. Moreover, this city's 88 branch libraries, many of them little more than storefronts, have other serious problems. Among them are "dilapidated facilities, damaged and stolen collections and too few personnel," according to a report of the Chicago Public Library Foundation.
NEWS
May 23, 1991 | Associated Press
Libraries may not bar homeless people just because they loiter or have body odor, because such a ban violates their First Amendment rights, a federal judge ruled Wednesday. U.S. District Judge H. Lee Sarokin found the restrictions at the Joint Free Public Library of Morristown and Morris Township unconstitutional, saying they were overly broad and curtailed access to books, newspapers and other library materials.
BUSINESS
August 5, 1998 | Associated Press
Charges on telephone bills to pay for cheap Internet hookups for schools and libraries could constitute an illegal tax, casting additional uncertainty over the politically touchy program, according to some of the House's top tax lawmakers. The House Ways and Means Committee's oversight subcommittee held a hearing on the matter, which is before a federal appeals court in New Orleans.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 22, 1998 | JEAN O. PASCO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Orange County officials plan to warn parents that children who log on to the Information Superhighway at their public libraries could be headed for the Internet's red-light districts. On Tuesday, Orange County Librarian John Adams will tell county supervisors about the library's new policy of requiring written parental permission before minors can sign on to the Internet at library computers. The policy will take effect July 1.
NEWS
June 24, 1997 | KAREN KAPLAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a drive to dramatically expand the reach of computer technology in public libraries, software billionaire Bill Gates and his wife, Melinda French Gates, on Monday announced a multimillion-dollar donation to help usher libraries in the United States and Canada into the 21st century. The newly formed Gates Library Foundation will donate $200 million over five years to help more than 8,000 libraries in rural and low-income areas develop computer resources for their patrons.
NEWS
June 23, 1997 | STEVE EMMONS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Things used to be simpler at the public library. You'd go to the card catalog, look up "Bambi" and find a storybook about a baby deer. Nowadays you go to the library's Internet terminal, type in "Bambi" and get more than 9,000 references--from "Tammy's Home Page" where "Thumper and Flower come out to play" to "Bambi--one of our hot Cyber Sex Toys Play Things!!! Win a FREE call!!"
NEWS
February 1, 1997 | MARY CURTIUS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Billed as the crown jewel of a civic renaissance, this city's New Main library opened just over nine months ago to national acclaim for its daring architecture and bold embrace of technology. Gleaming in marble splendor within the Civic Center, the New Main was hailed as a model public library for the 21st century.
NEWS
August 10, 1993 | JANNY SCOTT, TIMES EDUCATION WRITER
When the Los Angeles Central Library reopens this fall, seven years after an arsonist set it on fire, it will have all the accouterments of a modern library--including 100 surveillance cameras, motion detectors and access-control doors. In Sacramento, where a patron killed two librarians in April, their colleagues want panic buttons behind the desks. In Miami, libraries are hiring off-duty police officers and filling in windows to discourage break-ins.
MAGAZINE
November 15, 1992 | BILL THOMAS, Bill Thomas, a frequent contributor to this magazine, is the co-author of "Red Tape: Adventure Capitalism in the New Russia," recently published by Dutton
If the gathering of Washington luminaries at the Library of Congress last year had been a book, the cataloguing department would have shelved it under U.S. History, Wars . . . Cold. The occasion was a dinner honoring the late W. Averell Harriman, American ambassador to Moscow in the 1940s. The timing, a few months after the failed Kremlin coup, could not have been better. So many of Harriman's colleagues from the crusade against communism were there that it seemed like a victory party.
NEWS
May 23, 1991 | Associated Press
Libraries may not bar homeless people just because they loiter or have body odor, because such a ban violates their First Amendment rights, a federal judge ruled Wednesday. U.S. District Judge H. Lee Sarokin found the restrictions at the Joint Free Public Library of Morristown and Morris Township unconstitutional, saying they were overly broad and curtailed access to books, newspapers and other library materials.
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