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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 12, 1987
J. Bruce Henderson does have a library card. City librarian William W. Sannwald said Friday that Henderson, a San Diego City Council member who represents District 7, "has had a card for some time." Sannwald said that library personnel, checking computer records for a Times story Friday on council members who have or don't have library cards, had searched for a Bruce Henderson but didn't find one bearing the councilman's name.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
November 6, 2013 | By Ryan Faughnder
There's a new way to get movies, TV shows, music and audiobooks for free on the Internet. And no, it's not piracy -- it's through public libraries.  Hoopla Digital, a Netflix-like service for library card holders, on Wednesday announced agreements with NBCUniversal, Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Studios Inc., National Geographic and BBC America to stream content. Launched this year, Hoopla lets library patrons access its entertainment material through a mobile app or Web browser.  Jeff Jankowski, Hoopla's founder and owner, said the service can help make libraries more convenient for people who are too busy to make the trip to a physical location and more attractive to younger patrons who want to be able to access movies and music whenever and wherever they want.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 16, 1996 | SUSAN ABRAM
A library card can go a long way these days. That's the message county libraries would like to promote to parents and kids in kindergarten through ninth grade each time they flash their plastic to check out books. Through the month of September, or as long as supplies last, children who apply for or show library cards will receive passes to museums and free school-supply kits filled with markers, pens, rulers and note pads.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 6, 2012 | By Carolyn Kellogg
There was a reason Alan Moore's "Neonomicon" was shelved in the adult section of the library in Greenville County, South Carolina: It contains adult content. And it was checked out with an adult library card -- but that adult library card was in the hands of a 14-year-old girl. When the girl asked her mother about an unfamiliar word she found in "Neonomicon," the trouble started. The mother, Carrie Gaske, filed an official challenge against the graphic novel in June. An official decision has now been made to ban it from the library.
NEWS
August 23, 1990 | KATHIE BOZANICH
There are 10 public library systems in Orange County--the county's system, seven municipal systems and two district systems. To obtain a library card you must appear in person. Each system requires that anyone requesting a card have proof of a permanent address. This can be a driver's license, a government identification card, checkbook or household bills bearing the person's name.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 10, 2012 | By Catherine Saillant, Los Angeles Times
Los Angeles officials are considering a plan to turn the library card into a form of identification that the city's large illegal immigrant population could use to open bank accounts and access an array of city services. The City Council last month voted unanimously to study the plan, which would have Los Angeles join the growing number of cities across the nation that offer various forms of identification to undocumented workers and others who cannot get driver's licenses because of their immigration status.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 19, 1992 | ANNE C. ROARK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When Bobby Miller, age 5, dropped by the library with his mother, Robin, on their way home from traffic court in November, he took part in a ritual known to generations of American children: getting a library card. But the experience earned the 3 1/2-foot, 45-pound, towheaded kindergartner a small footnote in local history: The boy from Bellflower, known to librarians as "a handful," became the one-millionth cardholder at the Los Angeles County Public Library.
NEWS
July 15, 1990 | SARAH NORDGREN, ASSOCIATED PRESS
See Dick and Jane run--as long as it's not from the children's room to the rest of the Oak Lawn Memorial Library, where trustees have adopted a "PG-13" library-card policy. Beginning in September, parents of children under age 14 will have the option of a library card that would restrict their young to the children's room of the library. Period. Time magazine--in the periodical area--would be off limits. Ray Bradbury's book, "Fahrenheit 451"--in adult fiction--would be out of reach.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 11, 2012 | Catherine Saillant
Los Angeles officials are considering a plan to turn the library card into a form of identification that the city's large illegal immigrant population could use to open bank accounts and access an array of city services. The City Council unanimously voted recently to consider the proposal, which would have Los Angeles join the growing number of cities across the nation that offer various forms of identification to undocumented workers and others who cannot get driver's licenses because of their immigration status.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 6, 2012 | By Carolyn Kellogg
There was a reason Alan Moore's "Neonomicon" was shelved in the adult section of the library in Greenville County, South Carolina: It contains adult content. And it was checked out with an adult library card -- but that adult library card was in the hands of a 14-year-old girl. When the girl asked her mother about an unfamiliar word she found in "Neonomicon," the trouble started. The mother, Carrie Gaske, filed an official challenge against the graphic novel in June. An official decision has now been made to ban it from the library.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 17, 2012 | By Nita Lelyveld, Los Angeles Times
Murray Carter, 56, is living a life without luxury. He's out of work. He sleeps at the Weingart Center on skid row. He's hoping for a job as a cook. He needs to go online to find one. But he's worlds away from affording either a computer or Internet access. Well before the Central Library opens at 10 a.m., Carter waits out front to get in and grab a computer terminal. Photos: Down and out, but online at the library Toni Albert, 23, of East L.A. takes night nursing classes at community college.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 11, 2012 | Catherine Saillant
Los Angeles officials are considering a plan to turn the library card into a form of identification that the city's large illegal immigrant population could use to open bank accounts and access an array of city services. The City Council unanimously voted recently to consider the proposal, which would have Los Angeles join the growing number of cities across the nation that offer various forms of identification to undocumented workers and others who cannot get driver's licenses because of their immigration status.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 10, 2012 | By Catherine Saillant, Los Angeles Times
Los Angeles officials are considering a plan to turn the library card into a form of identification that the city's large illegal immigrant population could use to open bank accounts and access an array of city services. The City Council last month voted unanimously to study the plan, which would have Los Angeles join the growing number of cities across the nation that offer various forms of identification to undocumented workers and others who cannot get driver's licenses because of their immigration status.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 2, 2011 | Steve Lopez
"So a comedian walks into a library and decides to work there …" That's not my line. It's from Meredith Myers, the self-described Standup Librarian who just had something very unfunny happen to her. She got fired from a West Hollywood library job that she loved. But let's back up, all the way to Florida, where Myers discovered as a child that a library is a place to think, dream and figure things out. As an adult, she grabbed books on the PR business, leading to a 10-year career as a publicist.
OPINION
April 23, 2011 | Patt Morrison
For Ken Brecher to say that being the president of the Library Foundation of Los Angeles is the best job he's ever had -- well, that speaks volumes. Consider that he's run the Sundance Institute, the Boston Children's Museum and a major Philadelphia philanthropy; that he's an anthropologist with a Rhodes scholarship and two research tours in the Amazon on his resume. The British playwright Christopher Hampton used Brecher's field notes for his play "Savages. " He landed in Los Angeles as a theatrical "anthropologist in residence" -- a.k.a.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 21, 2010 | Maria L. La Ganga
Kayla Burris, soon to turn 6, had three loose teeth, a library card and a deep need for information. So she and her mother headed to the McCloud Branch Library on a recent Thursday afternoon, located  "Franklin and the Tooth Fairy" in the neat stacks and settled down in the big blue recliner for a little research. "We now know that the tooth fairy doesn't always leave money," said Stephanie Burris, who spends several hours a week with her children in the tiny library of this remote lumber town at the base of Mt. Shasta.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 31, 2000 | Renee Moilanen, (714) 966-4674
The library is urging residents to take part in Library Card Sign-Up Month throughout September. Librarians are spreading the word through posters, bookmarks and fliers near City Hall and through letters sent to local schools. To sign up for a library card, residents need to show proof of their address, and children need a parent's signature. Cards are available at the library, 17865 Santiago Blvd. Information: (714) 998-0861.
NEWS
September 4, 1994
The Venice branch of the Los Angeles city library will have access to new computers beginning Tuesday. Two IBM compatibles, equipped with educational and word processing software, will be available with a reservation and identification such as a driver's license or library card. The library system paid $7,000 for the machines.
OPINION
December 28, 2008
Re "In the thick of Prop. 8 fight," Dec. 21 We can only pray to whatever deity we believe in that Proposition 8 will be overturned and that Abel and Robbie Ferreira will continue to live in a gated community. Lucky for the rest of us that their views based on fairy tales such as the Garden of Eden and explicit knowledge of what "God hates" remain locked up tight and away from the general public. Kudos to them for sanctioning counseling for people who are struggling with the same-sex urges they were born with; very much like struggling against an elbow.
OPINION
March 3, 2007
Re "Kids' lit, with body parts," Opinion, Feb. 27 To paraphrase another controversial sculptor of the English language, a scrotum by any other name would, perhaps, be inappropriate for youngsters. But scrotum is the anatomically correct term for a part of the body. One wonders who could object to children learning biological vocabulary while being absorbed in an award-winning piece of literature? And yet, shockingly, there are some people who are objecting. As a member of the library committee of the Art Institute of California-Orange County, where I teach, I have ordered a copy of Susan Patron's "The Higher Power of Lucky."
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