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Library Tower

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NEWS
April 17, 1989 | JESUS SANCHEZ, Times Staff Writer
A special construction crew will show up for work Tuesday morning 1,017 feet above downtown Los Angeles. Following a tradition begun by builders during the Renaissance, a small evergreen tree--riding atop a 1,600-pound beam bearing workers' signatures--will be hoisted to the peak of the steel skeleton that recently has become the pinnacle of the downtown skyline. There, ironworkers will bolt and weld the beam into place and top off the frame of the tallest tower on the West Coast--the 73-story First Interstate World Center.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 11, 2006 | Steve Hymon, Times Staff Writer
Los Angeles Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa's frustration at not being told personally by the White House about the details of the reported terror plot against the city's tallest building stems from a greater annoyance: Nearly 7 1/2 months after taking office, Villaraigosa said Friday that he still has not succeeded in speaking or meeting with President Bush.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 26, 1997 | Steve Harvey
Now, you can have your personal skyline--in your dining room, if you wish. CIT Design of Glendale has created a line of maple chairs with backs resembling such landmarks as the Chrysler Building and the Transamerica Building, not to mention Notre Dame Cathedral (see photo). CIT's Phil Spinelli says that corporations sometimes buy half a dozen mixed architectural icons (in the manner of someone ordering doughnuts) for their conference or dining rooms. L.A.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 10, 2006 | Bob Pool and David Pierson, Times Staff Writers
Working in the West Coast's tallest building has its share of thrills -- those gut-grabbing high-speed elevator rides, the windows rattled by Santa Ana winds during business meetings and the drop-dead gorgeous sunset views that wrap around the horizon. So in the 72-floor U.S. Bank Tower in downtown Los Angeles, workers were taking the details President Bush offered Thursday about a previously reported foiled terrorist attack, perhaps on their building, with a stiff upper lip.
REAL ESTATE
June 19, 1988
If you were wondering how the $330-million second tower in the Library Square project in downtown Los Angeles will look, one of the first renderings of it is being released today. Coincidentally, Southern California Gas. Co. is announcing that it has signed a 20-year lease for 500,000 of the 1.2-million square feet of rentable space in the 52-story tower, and the transaction is one of the largest leases downtown this year. Its estimated value is $200 million. Cushman Realty Corp.
NEWS
August 15, 1988
Firefighters quickly snuffed a generator fire Sunday on the 19th floor of the Library Tower, a new building under construction on 5th Street just north of Grand Avenue. The fire, which produced a curl of smoke visible to much of the downtown area, was reported at 10:54 a.m. and put out at 11:05. No one was injured and no damage was done to the building. Assistant Fire Chief Jim Mullen said the reason the generator caught fire was not known.
NEWS
May 11, 1987 | DAVID W. MYERS
The developer of Library Tower, cornerstone of a long-delayed office complex that would provide nearly $50 million toward renovating and expanding the fire-damaged Central Library, has signed its first two tenants and plans to begin construction within the next several weeks. Spokesmen for the accounting firm of Arthur Andersen & Co.
BUSINESS
March 30, 2002 | JESUS SANCHEZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Developer MaguirePartners said Friday that it bought out its partner in the tallest building on the West Coast, the 73-story Library Tower in Los Angeles, in what industry observers say is one of the largest recent transactions involving a downtown skyscraper. The Los Angeles real estate company did not disclose the value of the deal for the building, which stands 1,017 feet tall.
BUSINESS
March 20, 2003 | Roger Vincent, Times Staff Writer
The red, white and blue logo of U.S. Bancorp appeared atop the tallest skyscraper in Los Angeles on Wednesday as the Minneapolis-based financial company entered final negotiations to take over offices once occupied by defunct accounting firm Arthur Andersen. Representatives of the bank and building owner MaguirePartners said only that they were discussing a possible lease, but downtown Los Angeles real estate sources said U.S.
NATIONAL
October 8, 2005 | Josh Meyer and Warren Vieth, Times Staff Writers
In the spring of 2003, Los Angeles police officials were summoned to a briefing with the FBI-led Joint Terrorism Task Force and told that the 73-story Library Tower might have been the target of a terrorist plot similar to that of the Sept. 11 suicide hijackings. When the plot was disclosed last year, authorities said publicly that they had viewed the claims by captured Al Qaeda chieftain Khalid Shaikh Mohammed with skepticism.
OPINION
March 28, 2004
It has been said that for only a couple of days a year is Los Angeles allowed to be beautiful. But when it is, nothing in the world can match the sight of downtown, free of its veil of smog, scraping the big cumulous clouds and framed by snow-capped mountains. The Library Tower, now the US Bank Tower, is the central image of this stunning diorama, with its pinnacle serving as the literal and figurative crown of the city dedicated to Our Lady, Queen of the Angels. However, US Bank's decision to place its logo on the crown and alter one of the most visible symbols of L.A. has vastly cheapened our city.
BUSINESS
March 20, 2003 | Roger Vincent, Times Staff Writer
The red, white and blue logo of U.S. Bancorp appeared atop the tallest skyscraper in Los Angeles on Wednesday as the Minneapolis-based financial company entered final negotiations to take over offices once occupied by defunct accounting firm Arthur Andersen. Representatives of the bank and building owner MaguirePartners said only that they were discussing a possible lease, but downtown Los Angeles real estate sources said U.S.
NATIONAL
September 11, 2002
"My security officers in the lobby prior to Sept. 11 were greeters. They were lobby ambassadors, friendly smiles, [a] 'welcome-to-our-home' kind of thing. Now, it's 'OK, who are you?' You come in. You are not in a suit. You are not in a tie. What is your business? Our job is to make sure that no ones gets to a floor unless a tenant wants them on that floor. So, we have a system in place where the tenants will let us know who they are expecting. Everybody checks [in] in the lobby.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 2, 2002 | ERIN CHAN and GARIOT LOUIMA, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
A telephone tip warning that a plane would strike the "First Interstate building" on Monday prompted hundreds of downtown workers to evacuate the second-tallest building in Los Angeles. After learning of the unsubstantiated threat from the FBI and Los Angeles police, managers at the Aon Center, previously known as the First Interstate Tower, notified the 70 companies that employ about 3,200 people in the building.
BUSINESS
March 30, 2002 | JESUS SANCHEZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Developer MaguirePartners said Friday that it bought out its partner in the tallest building on the West Coast, the 73-story Library Tower in Los Angeles, in what industry observers say is one of the largest recent transactions involving a downtown skyscraper. The Los Angeles real estate company did not disclose the value of the deal for the building, which stands 1,017 feet tall.
REAL ESTATE
June 21, 1987 | DAVID W. MYERS, David W. Myers is a Times real estate writer
Ground-breaking ceremonies will be held Tuesday for the $350-million Library Tower, a 73-story high-rise that will be the tallest building on the West Coast when it is completed by the end of 1989. The ceremonies also will mark the latest milestone in a complicated plan in which the developers of the project will pay about $50 million to help restore and expand the fire-damaged Central Library at 5th and Hope streets.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 2, 2002 | ERIN CHAN and GARIOT LOUIMA, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
A telephone tip warning that a plane would strike the "First Interstate building" on Monday prompted hundreds of downtown workers to evacuate the second-tallest building in Los Angeles. After learning of the unsubstantiated threat from the FBI and Los Angeles police, managers at the Aon Center, previously known as the First Interstate Tower, notified the 70 companies that employ about 3,200 people in the building.
NEWS
September 13, 2001 | JESUS SANCHEZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The sight of Manhattan's tallest buildings crumbling has triggered concern among the dwellers of other landmark buildings and raised questions about the long-term viability and status of the American skyscraper. The high-profile, prestige and size that attract image-conscious businesses to such buildings are the same features that make them attractive targets, say terrorism experts. That perception weighed on real estate executive C.
BUSINESS
January 30, 1998 | JESUS SANCHEZ
Taking advantage of lower interest rates, the owners of the 73-story Library Tower--the tallest building on the West Coast--have completed a $200-million refinancing of the downtown Los Angeles skyscraper. The deal ranks as one of the largest single-property refinancings in several years, according to GMAC Commercial Mortgage, which teamed up with Goldman Sachs Mortgage Co. to finance the transaction.
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