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Libya Foreign Aid West Germany

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NEWS
January 29, 1989 | WILLIAM TUOHY, Times Staff Writer
A U.S. senator rattled a sedate conference on defense issues here Saturday when he accused the West German government of failing to stop equipment and supplies from being shipped to a suspected chemical weapons plant in Libya. Sen. John S. McCain III (R-Ariz.) told the high-level seminar that senior Bonn officials "must have known that West German firms were contributing to the proliferation of chemical and biological weapons."
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NEWS
February 8, 1989 | ROBERT GILLETTE, Times Staff Writer
The United States has concluded that leading West German and Italian aerospace firms have played a critical role in helping Egypt, Iraq, Libya and Argentina develop medium-range ballistic missiles capable of carrying chemical warheads. Until recently, arms controllers worried about the proliferation of ballistic missiles used mainly as the delivery vehicles for nuclear weapons in regional conflicts.
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NEWS
January 23, 1989 | WILLIAM TUOHY, Times Staff Writer
A national newsmagazine published photographs Sunday to reinforce its assertion that a West German firm is furnishing air-to-air refueling technology to Libya that will give Col. Moammar Kadafi's fighter-bombers range enough to reach Israel. Der Spiegel printed four photographs, taken from a videotape, purporting to show a French-built Mirage jet of the Libyan air force nosing into a refueling drogue from another plane. The magazine said that Intec, a Munich-based company, had helped convert U.
NEWS
February 6, 1989
More than 100 firms from West Germany, Europe and the United States helped build the chemical plant in Libya that Washington says is intended to produce poison gas, the head of a West German company said. He did not identify any of the firms.
NEWS
February 6, 1989
More than 100 firms from West Germany, Europe and the United States helped build the chemical plant in Libya that Washington says is intended to produce poison gas, the head of a West German company said. He did not identify any of the firms.
NEWS
January 26, 1989 | WILLIAM TUOHY, Times Staff Writer
West German customs police staged raids Wednesday on the offices of three companies and the homes of a dozen executives and found evidence of their involvement in supplying an alleged chemical weapons plant in Libya, according to the prosecutor in charge of the investigation.
NEWS
January 26, 1989 | WILLIAM TUOHY, Times Staff Writer
Although the West German government plans to crack down on companies exporting supplies that are used in the production of chemical weapons, most analysts here believe that export controls will not halt the spread of such weapons. And while West Germans were deeply embarrassed to learn that their firms were once again involved in the manufacture of poison gas, specialists say that materials for chemical weapons are too readily available here and elsewhere to prevent proliferation.
NEWS
February 8, 1989 | ROBERT GILLETTE, Times Staff Writer
The United States has concluded that leading West German and Italian aerospace firms have played a critical role in helping Egypt, Iraq, Libya and Argentina develop medium-range ballistic missiles capable of carrying chemical warheads. Until recently, arms controllers worried about the proliferation of ballistic missiles used mainly as the delivery vehicles for nuclear weapons in regional conflicts.
NEWS
January 25, 1989 | WILLIAM TUOHY, Times Staff Writer
A West German government-owned company sold plans for a chemical plant in Libya with full knowledge that it was designed to produce toxic substances, a national magazine reported Tuesday. The weekly magazine Stern said that Salzgitter Industriebau, a subsidiary of the state-owned Salzgitter steelmaking group, was contacted by the West German chemical firm Imhausen-Chemie to draw up blueprints for the plant at Rabta in Libya.
NEWS
January 29, 1989 | WILLIAM TUOHY, Times Staff Writer
A U.S. senator rattled a sedate conference on defense issues here Saturday when he accused the West German government of failing to stop equipment and supplies from being shipped to a suspected chemical weapons plant in Libya. Sen. John S. McCain III (R-Ariz.) told the high-level seminar that senior Bonn officials "must have known that West German firms were contributing to the proliferation of chemical and biological weapons."
NEWS
January 26, 1989 | WILLIAM TUOHY, Times Staff Writer
West German customs police staged raids Wednesday on the offices of three companies and the homes of a dozen executives and found evidence of their involvement in supplying an alleged chemical weapons plant in Libya, according to the prosecutor in charge of the investigation.
NEWS
January 26, 1989 | WILLIAM TUOHY, Times Staff Writer
Although the West German government plans to crack down on companies exporting supplies that are used in the production of chemical weapons, most analysts here believe that export controls will not halt the spread of such weapons. And while West Germans were deeply embarrassed to learn that their firms were once again involved in the manufacture of poison gas, specialists say that materials for chemical weapons are too readily available here and elsewhere to prevent proliferation.
NEWS
January 25, 1989 | WILLIAM TUOHY, Times Staff Writer
A West German government-owned company sold plans for a chemical plant in Libya with full knowledge that it was designed to produce toxic substances, a national magazine reported Tuesday. The weekly magazine Stern said that Salzgitter Industriebau, a subsidiary of the state-owned Salzgitter steelmaking group, was contacted by the West German chemical firm Imhausen-Chemie to draw up blueprints for the plant at Rabta in Libya.
NEWS
January 23, 1989 | WILLIAM TUOHY, Times Staff Writer
A national newsmagazine published photographs Sunday to reinforce its assertion that a West German firm is furnishing air-to-air refueling technology to Libya that will give Col. Moammar Kadafi's fighter-bombers range enough to reach Israel. Der Spiegel printed four photographs, taken from a videotape, purporting to show a French-built Mirage jet of the Libyan air force nosing into a refueling drogue from another plane. The magazine said that Intec, a Munich-based company, had helped convert U.
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