Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsLibya Foreign Relations
IN THE NEWS

Libya Foreign Relations

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
April 4, 1992 | Associated Press
Moammar Kadafi said Friday that he had taken steps to protect the embassies of countries that favor sanctions against Libya. The Libyan leader's assurances came a day after Libyan rioters wrecked the Venezuelan Embassy, smashing furniture and ripping up the garden, and tried to storm the Russian mission, wrecking cars when they were turned back. They also threw rocks at the Austrian mission and held angry protests outside the Belgian, French and Italian embassies.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
April 4, 1992 | Associated Press
Moammar Kadafi said Friday that he had taken steps to protect the embassies of countries that favor sanctions against Libya. The Libyan leader's assurances came a day after Libyan rioters wrecked the Venezuelan Embassy, smashing furniture and ripping up the garden, and tried to storm the Russian mission, wrecking cars when they were turned back. They also threw rocks at the Austrian mission and held angry protests outside the Belgian, French and Italian embassies.
Advertisement
NEWS
November 16, 1991 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Brushing aside Libya's proposal to litigate the case of Pan American Flight 103 in the World Court, the Bush Administration sought Friday to enlist at least 20 other countries in a broad international effort to isolate Moammar Kadafi's regime economically, politically and diplomatically. "Our intention is to work with the allies on a concerted response," White House Press Secretary Marlin Fitzwater said. "Many other countries are interested and . . . want to have a role of some kind."
NEWS
February 3, 1992 | CARYLE MURPHY, THE WASHINGTON POST
Moammar Kadafi, asserting that Libya is a "scapegoat" in the terrorist bombing of a Pan American airliner more than three years ago, said he believes, nonetheless, that a compromise could be reached to avert threatened U.N. sanctions against his country. He also called on the United States to reopen its embassy in Tripoli, complaining that indirect contacts between the two governments have so far been fruitless. Kadafi said his government has responded positively to a U.N.
NEWS
February 3, 1992 | CARYLE MURPHY, THE WASHINGTON POST
Moammar Kadafi, asserting that Libya is a "scapegoat" in the terrorist bombing of a Pan American airliner more than three years ago, said he believes, nonetheless, that a compromise could be reached to avert threatened U.N. sanctions against his country. He also called on the United States to reopen its embassy in Tripoli, complaining that indirect contacts between the two governments have so far been fruitless. Kadafi said his government has responded positively to a U.N.
NEWS
October 16, 1988 | MICHAEL ROSS, Times Staff Writer
If Libyan leader Moammar Kadafi had gone into business instead of politics, he probably would have been a corporate raider. For many years now, the mercurial colonel has been pursuing what might be described as the revolutionary equivalent of a hostile takeover bid. Obsessed with realizing his own peculiar vision of Arab unity, Kadafi has been seeking to merge Libya with other Islamic countries ever since he came to power 19 years ago.
NEWS
November 16, 1991 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Brushing aside Libya's proposal to litigate the case of Pan American Flight 103 in the World Court, the Bush Administration sought Friday to enlist at least 20 other countries in a broad international effort to isolate Moammar Kadafi's regime economically, politically and diplomatically. "Our intention is to work with the allies on a concerted response," White House Press Secretary Marlin Fitzwater said. "Many other countries are interested and . . . want to have a role of some kind."
NEWS
October 16, 1988 | MICHAEL ROSS, Times Staff Writer
If Libyan leader Moammar Kadafi had gone into business instead of politics, he probably would have been a corporate raider. For many years now, the mercurial colonel has been pursuing what might be described as the revolutionary equivalent of a hostile takeover bid. Obsessed with realizing his own peculiar vision of Arab unity, Kadafi has been seeking to merge Libya with other Islamic countries ever since he came to power 19 years ago.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|