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NEWS
June 14, 1999 | From Times Wire Reports
South African President Nelson Mandela welcomed Libyan leader Moammar Kadafi as his last official guest and said the ending of the Lockerbie impasse had justified close ties with Tripoli. "We are . . . overwhelmed by at last having here on this southern tip of Africa one of the revolutionary icons of our times," Mandela told guests at a lunch in his Cape Town offices.
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NEWS
June 14, 1999 | From Times Wire Reports
South African President Nelson Mandela welcomed Libyan leader Moammar Kadafi as his last official guest and said the ending of the Lockerbie impasse had justified close ties with Tripoli. "We are . . . overwhelmed by at last having here on this southern tip of Africa one of the revolutionary icons of our times," Mandela told guests at a lunch in his Cape Town offices.
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NEWS
April 26, 1996 | BOB DROGIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Since winning the country's first all-race elections two years ago today, Nelson Mandela's government has won high marks abroad for its deft handling of post-apartheid domestic problems, from integrating the military to defusing militant labor unions. But its foreign policy has been marked by embarrassments and affronts to friendly Western governments.
NEWS
March 28, 1998 | ELIZABETH SHOGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Exhibiting the moral authority he draws from his extraordinary personal history, South African President Nelson Mandela on Friday pointedly told President Clinton to follow his lead and negotiate face-to-face with his enemies to solve conflicts peacefully. Mandela added that he intends to remain "loyal" to old friends--such as Cuba and Libya--even if it displeases the Clinton administration.
NEWS
March 28, 1998 | ELIZABETH SHOGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Exhibiting the moral authority he draws from his extraordinary personal history, South African President Nelson Mandela on Friday pointedly told President Clinton to follow his lead and negotiate face-to-face with his enemies to solve conflicts peacefully. Mandela added that he intends to remain "loyal" to old friends--such as Cuba and Libya--even if it displeases the Clinton administration.
NEWS
October 23, 1997 | From Times Wire Services
South African President Nelson Mandela, sternly dismissing U.S. reservations about his mission, arrived in Libya on Wednesday for a visit described by diplomats as the most important for Moammar Kadafi since the United Nations clamped sanctions on his nation in 1992. Since the U.N. sanctions ban flights into or out of the North African country, Mandela flew to neighboring Tunisia on Wednesday and then proceeded by motorcade across the border to Libya.
NEWS
October 23, 1997 | From Times Wire Services
South African President Nelson Mandela, sternly dismissing U.S. reservations about his mission, arrived in Libya on Wednesday for a visit described by diplomats as the most important for Moammar Kadafi since the United Nations clamped sanctions on his nation in 1992. Since the U.N. sanctions ban flights into or out of the North African country, Mandela flew to neighboring Tunisia on Wednesday and then proceeded by motorcade across the border to Libya.
NEWS
April 26, 1996 | BOB DROGIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Since winning the country's first all-race elections two years ago today, Nelson Mandela's government has won high marks abroad for its deft handling of post-apartheid domestic problems, from integrating the military to defusing militant labor unions. But its foreign policy has been marked by embarrassments and affronts to friendly Western governments.
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