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November 30, 1988 | CHARLES P. WALLACE, Times Staff Writer
Two and a half years after U.S. warplanes bombed Col. Moammar Kadafi's headquarters here, Libya is pressing for a rapid improvement in relations with the United States. "It's time to start talking and stop shooting and shouting," Ali Ahmed Houderi, a member of the People's Committee for Foreign Liaison Bureau, the local equivalent of a Foreign Ministry undersecretary, said in an interview. Kadafi himself has appeared on U.S.
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NEWS
March 23, 1990 | From Times Wire Services
A controversial factory in Libya damaged by fire last week was designed solely for making chemical weapons, West Germany said Thursday after an official investigation. The public prosecutor's office in Mannheim also said in a statement that a West German businessman was indicted on charges he helped build the Libyan plant, which the United States has insisted produced chemical weapons.
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NEWS
January 23, 1989 | WILLIAM TUOHY, Times Staff Writer
A national newsmagazine published photographs Sunday to reinforce its assertion that a West German firm is furnishing air-to-air refueling technology to Libya that will give Col. Moammar Kadafi's fighter-bombers range enough to reach Israel. Der Spiegel printed four photographs, taken from a videotape, purporting to show a French-built Mirage jet of the Libyan air force nosing into a refueling drogue from another plane. The magazine said that Intec, a Munich-based company, had helped convert U.
NEWS
March 17, 1990 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Bush Administration called on other industrial nations Friday to deny Libya the technology and equipment it will need to rebuild the fire-damaged factory suspected of producing poison gas. "We (will) make known publicly and through our diplomatic channels to everyone we can how seriously we view this plant," said State Department spokeswoman Margaret Tutwiler. "It is in no one's interest to see the plant rebuilt."
NEWS
March 16, 1990 | KIM MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Libyan leader Moammar Kadafi threatened Thursday to retaliate against West Germany if that country helped to instigate a fire at a controversial chemical plant near Tripoli, but he angrily denied that Libya had been producing chemical weapons at the facility.
NEWS
January 4, 1989 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, Times Staff Writer
The Reagan Administration, asserting that Libya does not have the technical capacity to produce poison gas without foreign help, Tuesday called on all industrial nations to prevent their citizens from aiding Col. Moammar Kadafi's controversial new plant near Tripoli. Secretary of State George P. Shultz plans to press his call for international cooperation against Kadafi this weekend when he leads the U.S.
NEWS
January 15, 1989 | WILLIAM TUOHY, Times Staff Writer
The government denied Saturday that Chancellor Helmut Kohl had been involved in a political cover-up by trying to exonerate West German firms from complicity in building a chemical complex in Libya. The denial was prompted by the charges of opposition politicians that Kohl had engaged in evasive statements and "cover-up attempts" in asserting the week before last that there was not enough evidence to indicate that West German companies helped in the plant's construction.
NEWS
January 6, 1989 | WILLIAM TUOHY, Times Staff Writer
West German investigators declared Thursday that after examining U.S.-supplied evidence, they have found no reason to believe that a West German chemical firm secretly served as the general contractor for a plant in Libya that the United States says was built to produce poison gas.
NEWS
October 1, 1988 | Associated Press
West Germany appointed Juergen Hellner as its new ambassador to Libya, a post that had been vacant since the 1986 bombing of a West Berlin disco that U.S. officials blamed on the government of Moammar Kadafi, a Foreign Ministry spokesman said Friday.
NEWS
January 13, 1989 | From Times Wire Services
U.S. intelligence agencies got hard evidence that Libya has a poison gas plant by eavesdropping on frantic Libyan telephone calls for help to West German companies after a spill during a poison gas production test last August, NBC News reported Thursday. It said summaries of the intercepted conversations were recently turned over to West German officials to quash their government's denials that West German firms had helped build what the United States says is a Libyan chemical weapons plant.
NEWS
March 16, 1990 | KIM MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Libyan leader Moammar Kadafi threatened Thursday to retaliate against West Germany if that country helped to instigate a fire at a controversial chemical plant near Tripoli, but he angrily denied that Libya had been producing chemical weapons at the facility.
NEWS
March 26, 1989
A Munich-based newspaper reported that a member of the West German Parliament from the ecological Greens party has links to a Libyan-financed foundation. Party leaders said they will investigate the allegations. Sueddeutsche Zeitung said Alfred Mechtersheimer is involved with the M.A.G. Foundation for Peace and Solidarity based in Vaduz, Liechstenstein. It said the foundation was financed by a $10-million account set up in Switzerland by Libyan leader Col. Moammar Kadafi.
NEWS
January 25, 1989 | WILLIAM TUOHY, Times Staff Writer
A West German government-owned company sold plans for a chemical plant in Libya with full knowledge that it was designed to produce toxic substances, a national magazine reported Tuesday. The weekly magazine Stern said that Salzgitter Industriebau, a subsidiary of the state-owned Salzgitter steelmaking group, was contacted by the West German chemical firm Imhausen-Chemie to draw up blueprints for the plant at Rabta in Libya.
NEWS
January 23, 1989 | WILLIAM TUOHY, Times Staff Writer
A national newsmagazine published photographs Sunday to reinforce its assertion that a West German firm is furnishing air-to-air refueling technology to Libya that will give Col. Moammar Kadafi's fighter-bombers range enough to reach Israel. Der Spiegel printed four photographs, taken from a videotape, purporting to show a French-built Mirage jet of the Libyan air force nosing into a refueling drogue from another plane. The magazine said that Intec, a Munich-based company, had helped convert U.
NEWS
January 19, 1989 | WILLIAM TUOHY, Times Staff Writer
Chancellor Helmut Kohl's policies in the matter of the Libyan chemical plant have deceived the West German public and severely damaged relations between West Germany and the United States, an opposition political leader charged Wednesday. Norbert Gansel, an armaments expert of the Social Democratic Party, said during a two-hour debate in the Bundestag, the lower house of Parliament, that Kohl had encouraged "the business of death."
NEWS
January 18, 1989 | WILLIAM TUOHY, Times Staff Writer
The row over West German companies' involvement in building a controversial chemical plant in Libya has soured Bonn-Washington relations more than any event since Chancellor Helmut Kohl insisted that President Reagan visit the military cemetery at Bitburg in April, 1985. This was the general impression shared Tuesday by diplomats, political observers and editorialists as the Bundestag (Parliament) prepared to debate the affair at a session today.
NEWS
January 16, 1989 | WILLIAM TUOHY, Times Staff Writer
A West German firm is helping Libya to develop the technique for air-to-air refueling of its jet fighter-bombers to give them enough range to reach Israel, a national newsmagazine reported Sunday. An official of the firm denied the report. Der Spiegel, edited in Hamburg, identified the West German company as a Bavarian firm called Intec, operating under the cover of a sister-firm in Liechtenstein, CTTL.
NEWS
March 17, 1990 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Bush Administration called on other industrial nations Friday to deny Libya the technology and equipment it will need to rebuild the fire-damaged factory suspected of producing poison gas. "We (will) make known publicly and through our diplomatic channels to everyone we can how seriously we view this plant," said State Department spokeswoman Margaret Tutwiler. "It is in no one's interest to see the plant rebuilt."
NEWS
January 17, 1989 | WILLIAM TUOHY, Times Staff Writer
West German Finance Minister Gerhard Stoltenberg said Monday that his government has decided that a controversial chemical plant in Libya was built with West German help and was designed to make poison gas. Stoltenberg's comment was the first indication that a senior member of the West German government has come to accept that the plant was designed to produce chemical weapons, as the United States has charged.
NEWS
January 16, 1989 | WILLIAM TUOHY, Times Staff Writer
A West German firm is helping Libya to develop the technique for air-to-air refueling of its jet fighter-bombers to give them enough range to reach Israel, a national newsmagazine reported Sunday. An official of the firm denied the report. Der Spiegel, edited in Hamburg, identified the West German company as a Bavarian firm called Intec, operating under the cover of a sister-firm in Liechtenstein, CTTL.
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