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Libya Government

NEWS
December 3, 1998 | JOHN DANISZEWSKI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With Libyan leader Moammar Kadafi apparently close to surrendering two suspects to stand trial in the Netherlands for the bombing of Pan Am Flight 103, U.N. Secretary-General Kofi Annan was making arrangements Wednesday to fly to Libya this weekend to try to close the deal.
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NEWS
January 4, 1998 | From Associated Press
Just hours after he rerouted his flight Saturday to avoid Libya, Steve Fossett got permission to fly over the North African country on his quest to be the first person to pilot a balloon around the world. Team members were reevaluating their options to decide whether they should redirect Fossett to seek wind currents that would carry him across Libya, said Tim Cole, a member of the Washington University-based team. A spokeswoman later said Fossett could probably avoid the country.
NEWS
February 8, 1997 | MARY WILLIAMS WALSH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Almost 11 years after two U.S. servicemen and a Turkish woman were killed in a terrorist bombing of a discotheque popular with Americans here, German prosecutors said Friday that they have charged five suspects and will put them on trial this summer. The extent of Libya's role in the bombing will also be under scrutiny, said Dieter Neumann, Berlin's top prosecutor, explaining that he hopes to prove a case of state-sponsored terrorism.
NEWS
January 18, 1997 | Associated Press
Millionaire adventurer Steve Fossett finally got permission Friday to fly over Libya but his crew said the delay could still jeopardize his round-the-world balloon flight. The 52-year-old Chicago securities trader had been forced to decrease altitude to avoid Libya during the negotiations, losing speed and wasting fuel. As he crossed Niger on Friday, his crew said the delay may have hurt his chances of becoming the first balloonist to circle the globe nonstop.
NEWS
September 19, 1996 | JOHN DANISZEWSKI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In Janzur Village, a Mediterranean beach haven for the new oligarchy of rich, well-connected Libyans, families sit outside whitewashed bungalows, watching television with expensive satellite dishes that bring a glimpse of the outside world to their ostracized nation. Ignoring warning glares from neighbors, two university students converse with some visiting Americans, eager to discuss NBA basketball and their favorite musicians--singer Barry White and the rock group Metallica.
NEWS
August 29, 1996 | From Associated Press
The federal government Wednesday denied Nation of Islam leader Louis Farrakhan permission to accept a promised $1-billion gift from Libya to help African Americans economically and politically. Accused of supporting global terrorism, Libya for years has been under U.S. sanctions that bar most financial transactions between the two countries and limit travel.
NEWS
October 1, 1995 | From Reuters
Libya expelled about 800 Palestinians, including women and children from Tripoli, to a barren strip along the border with Egypt on Saturday, witnesses said. A United Nations official said the latest expulsions brought to about 6,000 the number of Palestinians thrown out of Libya in the past three months. The latest batch of deported Palestinians, many without identity cards or travel documents, were taken to Salum border crossing.
NEWS
September 1, 1994 | ROBIN WRIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In one of several desperate bids to ease the tightening grip of U.N. sanctions, Moammar Kadafi's troubled regime in Libya has held out the prospect of turning over an indicted CIA renegade to appease the U.S. government, according to U.S. sources and a former CIA official.
NEWS
August 13, 1992 | KIM MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Libya, seeking to avert the threat of escalated sanctions in the case of two suspects wanted in the bombing of an American airliner, has indicated it might consider releasing the two men for trial in Scotland with the presence of observers from neutral countries, according to Arab diplomatic sources.
NEWS
June 29, 1992 | KIM MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Outside the large Russian Embassy compound here, the burned-out shells of four cars stand on the curb, windshields smashed, diplomatic license plates singed. The wreckage marks the day a mob of angry Libyans stormed the embassy and were fought back from the chancery door with bursts of tear gas as they demanded an answer from the Russian "traitors." In many ways, however, the black hulks also mark the end of the Cold War in the Middle East.
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