Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsLibya History
IN THE NEWS

Libya History

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
September 10, 1989 | KIM MURPHY, Times Staff Writer
Chunks of twisted ceiling panels litter the entrance hall in what was once Libya's grandest villa. Paintings tilt crazily above overturned sofas. Upstairs, a child's bloodstained mattress is encased in a glass shroud.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
September 10, 1989 | KIM MURPHY, Times Staff Writer
Chunks of twisted ceiling panels litter the entrance hall in what was once Libya's grandest villa. Paintings tilt crazily above overturned sofas. Upstairs, a child's bloodstained mattress is encased in a glass shroud.
Advertisement
WORLD
May 22, 2011 | By Borzou Daragahi, Los Angeles Times
  The elderly Italian woman will know more. Her name is Maria, or Um Dani, the mother of Daniel. She lives beyond the Arch of Marcus Aurelius, past the Gurgi Mosque, the one with the blue and gold tiles around the marble doorway. Then down an unpaved path, over by the 17th century Church of Santa Maria degli Angeli, where she is a parishioner, somewhere in that jumble of alleyways. She has lived there forever. The kids playing ball in the street will know exactly where. Her friend died 10, 15 years ago. And so she's perhaps the only Italian left from that era, from before Moammar Kadafi and his men took power four decades ago and hurried the Europeans out of the country, seizing their homes and property.
NEWS
October 20, 2011 | By James Oliphant
As you might expect, Republicans aren't exactly rushing to credit the Obama administration for first the downfall and now the death of Moammar Kadafi, even though the United States was part of the NATO force that backed the rebels who deposed the longtime Libyan leader. Sens. John McCain and Marco Rubio, who have favored strong U.S. intervention in the Libyan conflict, took it one step further Thursday, praising the efforts of Britain and France in bringing down Kadafi. That's right.
WORLD
August 28, 2011 | By Borzou Daragahi, Los Angeles Times
The two cousins still couldn't believe it. Just six months ago, they were working-class guys in the coastal town of Misurata making ends meet in Moammar Kadafi's Libya. Now they were in their pickup cruising around the capital. A capital they controlled. Abdul Hamid Issa, 46, was a construction worker, Mohammad Issa, 45, a carpenter. But then came the Arab Spring. In February, inspired by the revolutions in neighboring Egypt and Tunisia, the two men were among the first to take part in peaceful protests against the man who had ruled their country since they were children.
NEWS
May 8, 1994 | DOYLE McMANUS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The scenario is called "nuclear dominoes," and it is every defense planner's nightmare--because the first dominoes have already begun to fall. It begins this way: North Korea succeeds in putting a nuclear warhead atop a medium-range missile--and then offers to sell similar weapons to other "outlaw states." Or Iran buys a nuclear bomb from the arsenal of the former Soviet Union. Or Ukraine declares itself a nuclear power and keeps some of the nuclear weapons already on its territory.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|