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NEWS
June 23, 1992 | KIM MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Col. Moammar Kadafi is attempting to control a rising level of conflict within his own regime ignited by the Lockerbie crisis, coming amid growing anti-government resentment that diplomats say has placed Kadafi's regime at its most precarious point since Libya's revolution in 1969.
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NEWS
June 23, 1992 | KIM MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Col. Moammar Kadafi is attempting to control a rising level of conflict within his own regime ignited by the Lockerbie crisis, coming amid growing anti-government resentment that diplomats say has placed Kadafi's regime at its most precarious point since Libya's revolution in 1969.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 2, 2011
TODAY Good Morning America (N) 7 a.m. KABC The Chris Matthews Show President Obama's campaign as incumbent; Republican hopefuls who avoid interviews: Bob Woodward, the Washington Post; John Heilemann, New York Magazine; Helene Cooper, the New York Times; Alex Wagner, Politics Daily (N) 5 p.m. KNBC McLaughlin Group 6:30 p.m. KCET SUNDAY CBS News Sunday Morning Chris Rock. (N) 6 a.m. KCBS Today (N) 6 a.m. KNBC Good Morning America (N)
NEWS
January 29, 2013 | By Paul Richter and Michael Memoli
WASHINGTON   - The Senate voted overwhelmingly Tuesday to confirm Sen. John F. Kerry (D-Mass.) as the next secretary of State, filling a crucial national security spot in President Obama's second-term Cabinet. The 94-3 vote clears the way for Kerry to replace Hillary Rodham Clinton after she steps down Friday. Kerry, who will become America's 68th top diplomat, failed to win only three Republican votes  - those of Sens. John Cornyn and Rafael “Ted” Cruz, both of Texas, and Sen. James M. Inhofe of Oklahoma.  A spokesman for Cornyn said Kerry supported liberal positions that most Texans oppose.
NEWS
September 12, 2012 | By Lisa Mascaro
Congressional leaders swiftly condemned the deadly attack on the U.S. consulate in Benghazi, Libya, but defense hawks in particular said now is not the time to back away from supporting democratic efforts in the Middle East. "We are anguished and outraged," said a joint statement from three of the Senate's top defense leaders, Sen. John McCain (R-Ariz.), Sen. Lindsey Graham (R-S.C.) and Sen. Joseph Lieberman, the independent from Connecticut. They called the slain U.S. ambassador, Chris Stevens, a friend.
OPINION
April 1, 2011
In his speech to the nation this week, President Obama drew a distinction between the goals of the no-fly zone in Libya — a NATO-led military endeavor narrowly aimed at protecting civilians from a humanitarian disaster — and separate, nonmilitary efforts by the United States to remove Moammar Kadafi from power. "The world would be better off without Kadafi," Obama said, but "broadening our military mission to include regime change would be a mistake. " Instead, he said, the U.S. would rely on tactics such as denying the regime arms, cutting off its cash and "assisting the opposition" to hasten Kadafi's downfall.
OPINION
December 17, 2013 | By Brian Klaas and Jason Pack
Three years ago Tuesday, the Arab Spring began when 26-year-old vegetable vendor Mohamed Bouazizi set himself on fire in suicidal protest against the political repression and limited economic opportunity offered in dictator Zine el Abidine ben Ali's Tunisia. This literal spark ignited dramatic political change across the Middle East. Today, Tunisia's stalled transition remains the last, best prospect for a democratic blossoming from the Arab Spring. Hope lives on because Tunisia has learned from the other derailed democratic experiments in the region, notably in Iraq, Egypt and Libya.
NEWS
April 26, 1986 | DOYLE McMANUS, Times Staff Writer
Secretary of State George P. Shultz said Friday that the United States should consider using covert action to weaken the Libyan regime of Col. Moammar Kadafi along with expanded economic sanctions and the veiled threat of additional military force.
WORLD
June 6, 2011 | By Paul Richter, Los Angeles Times
As fellow rebels back in Libya plot fresh attacks against embattled leader Moammar Kadafi, the chief of the Libyan insurgency's American outpost sits in a tiny, borrowed Washington office and faces a more immediate question: Who will pay the bills? Ali Aujali, the soft-spoken representative from the rebels' ruling body, the Transitional National Council, has spent three months in a forlorn effort to persuade the Obama administration to extend diplomatic recognition to his group, a move that would bolster its international standing and could provide access to $34 billion in frozen Libyan assets.
NEWS
September 13, 2012 | By Kathleen Hennessey and Christi Parsons, This post has been updated. See note below for details
GOLDEN, Colo. - Hours after President Obama declared that Egypt was neither an ally nor an enemy, the White House on Thursday tweaked that answer to say the strategically important nation was a “long-standing and close partner.” Downplaying the tension evident in the president's remarks in an interview late Wednesday, White House spokesman Jay Carney said Obama was speaking in the technical terms of diplomacy and that nothing about U.S. policy...
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