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Libya Revolts

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NEWS
May 18, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
About 350 Libyan guerrillas trained by the United States to fight dictator Moammar Kadafi have been transported to undisclosed locations in America to be resettled at government expense, American officials said. The decision to accept the soldiers of the self-styled Libya National Army as refugees ended a six-month odyssey for the troops who once served in Kadafi's force that invaded Chad, Libya's southern neighbor. The Office of the U.N.
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WORLD
September 23, 2011 | By Patrick J. McDonnell, Los Angeles Times
Its principal commercial drag, Tripoli Street, could be the Hollywood set for an urban warfare action thriller: Charred tanks and pulverized shipping containers sit in front of blackened buildings pockmarked with rounds from bullets, rockets and sundry other lethal ordnance. But the hellish scene in the western port city of Misurata has nothing to do with fiction. More than a thousand people were killed here and many more injured in a months-long series of street battles that ousted the forces of Moammar Kadafi from the city and eventually, its environs.
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NEWS
October 30, 1993 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Libyan leader Moammar Kadafi has described reports of a military uprising against him as "a blatant lie." In a speech to university faculty and students carried on Libyan television, Kadafi denied Western reports that he had called out the air force to put down a rebellion at an army base near Misratah, east of the Libyan capital, Tripoli. Kadafi accused the British Broadcasting Corp. and the British intelligence service of fabricating the stories to demoralize the Libyan people.
WORLD
August 28, 2011 | By Jeffrey Fleishman, Los Angeles Times
Artillery shells and airstrikes, not placards and peaceful protests, sent Moammar Kadafi fleeing from his fortress: The Libyan uprising has made it clear that even the most brutal leaders may be endangered icons in a region reshaped since the first stirrings of revolt late last year. The 6-month-old Libyan revolt tapped into the spirit of revolutions that swept Egypt and Tunisia, but its darker narrative sobered the early euphoria of the so-called Arab Spring. Libyan protesters began peacefully but were quickly confronted with the tactics of a leader who bombed hospitals and unleashed tanks on mosques.
NEWS
April 12, 1987 | MICHAEL ROSS, Times Staff Writer
One year after the American bombing of Libya, Col. Moammar Kadafi faces what Arab and Western analysts consider the most serious internal crisis of his long, mercurial reign as ruler of the Libyan state. These analysts said they doubt that opposition to Kadafi is serious enough to overthrow him. But they added that his opponents are expected to preoccupy him for some time and perhaps even have the same depressant effect on Libyan-sponsored terrorism that the U.S. attack had for a brief period.
NEWS
January 5, 1997 | From Times Wire Reports
A Libyan opposition group said six senior army officers executed in Libya had taken part in a failed revolt against leader Moammar Kadafi and that their deaths were meant as a warning to other rebels. Libyan state radio said the six officers and two civilians were executed Thursday after a military court found them guilty of spying using equipment supplied by the CIA.
NEWS
October 25, 1993 | KIM MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Libyan leader Moammar Kadafi has violently quelled a series of uprisings within his own army and security forces that broke out in three areas of central Libya over a period of several days, diplomatic and opposition sources said Sunday.
WORLD
August 28, 2011 | By Jeffrey Fleishman, Los Angeles Times
Artillery shells and airstrikes, not placards and peaceful protests, sent Moammar Kadafi fleeing from his fortress: The Libyan uprising has made it clear that even the most brutal leaders may be endangered icons in a region reshaped since the first stirrings of revolt late last year. The 6-month-old Libyan revolt tapped into the spirit of revolutions that swept Egypt and Tunisia, but its darker narrative sobered the early euphoria of the so-called Arab Spring. Libyan protesters began peacefully but were quickly confronted with the tactics of a leader who bombed hospitals and unleashed tanks on mosques.
WORLD
September 23, 2011 | By Patrick J. McDonnell, Los Angeles Times
Its principal commercial drag, Tripoli Street, could be the Hollywood set for an urban warfare action thriller: Charred tanks and pulverized shipping containers sit in front of blackened buildings pockmarked with rounds from bullets, rockets and sundry other lethal ordnance. But the hellish scene in the western port city of Misurata has nothing to do with fiction. More than a thousand people were killed here and many more injured in a months-long series of street battles that ousted the forces of Moammar Kadafi from the city and eventually, its environs.
NEWS
March 28, 2011 | By James Oliphant, Washington Bureau
President Obama faces one of the more difficult public relations challenges of his presidency in Monday evening's speech on Libya, and he will carefully seek to thread a number of rhetorical needles in order to get what appears to be a fairly subtle message across to the American public. Along the lines of the United Nations mandate under which the United States is operating, the president must outline America's role in the Libyan conflict in humanitarian terms, while making clear that the situation in the North African country differs from other situations, past and present, in which citizens have suffered at the hands of a despotic regime.
NEWS
March 28, 2011 | By James Oliphant, Washington Bureau
President Obama faces one of the more difficult public relations challenges of his presidency in Monday evening's speech on Libya, and he will carefully seek to thread a number of rhetorical needles in order to get what appears to be a fairly subtle message across to the American public. Along the lines of the United Nations mandate under which the United States is operating, the president must outline America's role in the Libyan conflict in humanitarian terms, while making clear that the situation in the North African country differs from other situations, past and present, in which citizens have suffered at the hands of a despotic regime.
NEWS
January 5, 1997 | From Times Wire Reports
A Libyan opposition group said six senior army officers executed in Libya had taken part in a failed revolt against leader Moammar Kadafi and that their deaths were meant as a warning to other rebels. Libyan state radio said the six officers and two civilians were executed Thursday after a military court found them guilty of spying using equipment supplied by the CIA.
NEWS
October 30, 1993 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Libyan leader Moammar Kadafi has described reports of a military uprising against him as "a blatant lie." In a speech to university faculty and students carried on Libyan television, Kadafi denied Western reports that he had called out the air force to put down a rebellion at an army base near Misratah, east of the Libyan capital, Tripoli. Kadafi accused the British Broadcasting Corp. and the British intelligence service of fabricating the stories to demoralize the Libyan people.
NEWS
October 25, 1993 | KIM MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Libyan leader Moammar Kadafi has violently quelled a series of uprisings within his own army and security forces that broke out in three areas of central Libya over a period of several days, diplomatic and opposition sources said Sunday.
NEWS
May 18, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
About 350 Libyan guerrillas trained by the United States to fight dictator Moammar Kadafi have been transported to undisclosed locations in America to be resettled at government expense, American officials said. The decision to accept the soldiers of the self-styled Libya National Army as refugees ended a six-month odyssey for the troops who once served in Kadafi's force that invaded Chad, Libya's southern neighbor. The Office of the U.N.
NEWS
April 12, 1987 | MICHAEL ROSS, Times Staff Writer
One year after the American bombing of Libya, Col. Moammar Kadafi faces what Arab and Western analysts consider the most serious internal crisis of his long, mercurial reign as ruler of the Libyan state. These analysts said they doubt that opposition to Kadafi is serious enough to overthrow him. But they added that his opponents are expected to preoccupy him for some time and perhaps even have the same depressant effect on Libyan-sponsored terrorism that the U.S. attack had for a brief period.
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