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January 7, 1989 | MICHAEL ROSS, Times Staff Writer
The Libyan regime has fortified its defenses around a factory that the Reagan Administration believes is being built to manufacture chemical weapons and has sent large numbers of civilians there in what appears to be an effort to deter the United States from attacking it. Libyan officials said that busloads of civilians have been converging on the factory at Rabta, a desert town about 40 miles southwest of Tripoli, for the past several days.
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WORLD
January 4, 2008 | From Times Wire Reports
Libya said it was uncomfortable with the idea of sanctions against Iran but vowed to be "constructive" in dealing with Tehran's nuclear program while chairing the U.N. Security Council this month. Libya took over the rotating presidency this week. Among the issues that may come up are Western calls for a new round of sanctions against Iran, which has ignored demands that it halt its enrichment program. Libyan Ambassador Giadalla Ettalhi said that "as a country that has suffered from sanctions we would definitely be in a difficult position."
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WORLD
January 4, 2008 | From Times Wire Reports
Libya said it was uncomfortable with the idea of sanctions against Iran but vowed to be "constructive" in dealing with Tehran's nuclear program while chairing the U.N. Security Council this month. Libya took over the rotating presidency this week. Among the issues that may come up are Western calls for a new round of sanctions against Iran, which has ignored demands that it halt its enrichment program. Libyan Ambassador Giadalla Ettalhi said that "as a country that has suffered from sanctions we would definitely be in a difficult position."
NEWS
January 7, 1989 | MICHAEL ROSS, Times Staff Writer
The Libyan regime has fortified its defenses around a factory that the Reagan Administration believes is being built to manufacture chemical weapons and has sent large numbers of civilians there in what appears to be an effort to deter the United States from attacking it. Libyan officials said that busloads of civilians have been converging on the factory at Rabta, a desert town about 40 miles southwest of Tripoli, for the past several days.
WORLD
December 15, 2009 | By Borzou Daragahi
A nation the West once considered a major sponsor of terrorism may have pulled off a groundbreaking coup against Al Qaeda: coaxing a group once strongly allied with Osama bin Laden to renounce its onetime partner as un-Islamic. Libya's government is trumpeting its success in persuading leaders and foot soldiers of the extremist Libyan Islamic Fighting Group to reject Al Qaeda's brand of violence. The decision, recounted by former members of the group and Libyan officials, offers a unique example of reconciliation between a government and a violent Islamic group once devoted to overthrowing it. "The government learned to sit with people who were opposed to them and have dialogue and understand them," said Abubakir Armela, a leader of the group who returned from exile in 2005.
NEWS
March 26, 2000 | From Times Wire Reports
Four U.S. State Department officials arrived in Tripoli, Libya's capital, on what is thought to be the first such visit since diplomatic ties were cut in 1981. The consular officers will assess Libya's security to determine whether to recommend lifting a ban on travel by U.S. citizens to the country. They will study security at airports, hotels and hospitals and will confer with foreign diplomats, said a senior U.S.
WORLD
November 24, 2004 | From Reuters
Libyan leader Moammar Kadafi said Tuesday that his country had been poorly rewarded for pledging to renounce nuclear, chemical and biological weapons and that other countries had little incentive to follow suit. Last December, Libya pledged to abandon the weapons, ending its international isolation. Kadafi told the French newspaper Le Figaro he was disappointed that the United States, Europe and Japan had not given Libya more security guarantees in return.
NEWS
May 1, 1986 | From Reuters
Greece plans to launch a campaign to win back American tourists who canceled vacations because of fears of guerrilla violence, the Greek National Tourist Organization said Wednesday. Tourist industry sources said the number of Americans visiting Greece is expected to fall by as much as half this year because of the situation in Libya and security fears caused by two hijackings over Greece in 1985.
NEWS
June 23, 1992 | KIM MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Col. Moammar Kadafi is attempting to control a rising level of conflict within his own regime ignited by the Lockerbie crisis, coming amid growing anti-government resentment that diplomats say has placed Kadafi's regime at its most precarious point since Libya's revolution in 1969.
WORLD
October 20, 2011 | By Jeffrey Fleishman and Scott Kraft, Los Angeles Times
In the modern pantheon of the world's dictators, Moammar Kadafi stood apart. Far apart. Erratic and mercurial, he fancied himself a political philosopher, practiced an unorthodox and deadly diplomacy, and cut a sometimes cartoonish figure in flowing robes and dark sunglasses, surrounded by heavily armed female bodyguards. He ruled Libya with an iron fist for 42 years, bestowing on himself an array of titles, including "king of culture," "king of kings of Africa" and, simply, "leader of the revolution.
NEWS
January 11, 1988 | Associated Press
Police are searching for a West Berlin woman suspected of planting a bomb nearly two years ago that killed two U.S. servicemen and a Turkish woman and wounded more than 200 people in a West Berlin discotheque, authorities said Sunday. President Reagan blamed Libya for the April 5, 1986, attack on the La Belle discotheque and ordered the retaliatory bombing of Tripoli and Benghazi 10 days later. Libya said 37 people died and 93 were wounded in the U.S. raid.
WORLD
April 23, 2013 | By Jeffrey Fleishman
CAIRO -- A car bomb exploded at the French Embassy in Tripoli, Libya, on Tuesday, injuring three people and raising the specter that Islamist militants were seeking retribution for France's military strikes against extremists in the West African nation of Mali. The bombing was the latest indication of the dangers facing a volatile Libya after the overthrow and death of Moammar Kadafi in 2011. The attack was the most potent against a foreign installation in the country since last year's assault on the U.S. Consulate in Benghazi, which killed four Americans, including Ambassador J. Christopher Stevens.
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