Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsLibya Territorial Waters
IN THE NEWS

Libya Territorial Waters

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
January 11, 1989 | MELISSA HEALY, Times Staff Writer
The U.S. Navy's 6th Fleet will conduct maneuvers off the Libyan coast next week, less than two weeks after two U.S. fighter jets downed a pair of Libyan warplanes over the Mediterranean, the Libyan ambassador to the United Nations said Tuesday. The Navy notified civilian aviation authorities in Libya that the naval exercises will take place Jan. 16 and 17 and warned civilian air traffic to steer clear of the area, Libyan Ambassador Ali Treiki told U.N. Security Council members.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
January 11, 1989 | MELISSA HEALY, Times Staff Writer
The U.S. Navy's 6th Fleet will conduct maneuvers off the Libyan coast next week, less than two weeks after two U.S. fighter jets downed a pair of Libyan warplanes over the Mediterranean, the Libyan ambassador to the United Nations said Tuesday. The Navy notified civilian aviation authorities in Libya that the naval exercises will take place Jan. 16 and 17 and warned civilian air traffic to steer clear of the area, Libyan Ambassador Ali Treiki told U.N. Security Council members.
Advertisement
NEWS
January 25, 1986 | Associated Press
Libyan leader Moammar Kadafi said Friday that he ordered his planes to patrol the Gulf of Sidra and put his navy and air force on "total alert" after U.S. air and naval maneuvers off Libya were announced. Kadafi said the planes were "to defend Libya's territorial waters." The United States has rejected Kadafi's claim to jurisdiction in the gulf. Around this capital city, no outward sign of a "total alert" was seen among Libyan naval forces or among troops in barracks.
NEWS
January 24, 1986 | Associated Press
As two U.S. aircraft carriers steamed toward Libya today with their jet fighters flying routine missions, Libyan leader Col. Moammar Kadafi said he has placed his navy and air force on "total alert" and Libya warned President Reagan that he is "playing with fire" by ordering U.S. air and naval operations off the Libyan coast.
NEWS
April 25, 1986 | MICHAEL ROSS, Times Staff Writer
There is a political joke that Libyans tell in private about a man who gets so angry waiting for hours in a long line to buy bread that he decides to kill the nation's leader, Col. Moammar Kadafi. He goes to the Aziziya Barracks where Kadafi lives in Tripoli and tells the guard at the gate, "I'm here to kill the leader." The guard points to an even longer queue stretching around the block and replies, "You'll have to get in line."
Los Angeles Times Articles
|