Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsLibya Trade
IN THE NEWS

Libya Trade

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
December 20, 1988
The United States said it is very concerned about a Libyan chemical arms plant and urged all nations to halt the sale of technologies and chemicals that could help Tripoli produce poison gas. "The U.S. believes that Libya has established (chemical weapons) production capability and is on the verge of full-scale production of these weapons," State Department spokeswoman Phyllis Oakley said. Such production would be troubling, she said, because of the "regime's support for terrorism."
ARTICLES BY DATE
WORLD
April 24, 2004 | James Gerstenzang and Paul Richter, Times Staff Writers
Signaling that it believes Libya is upholding its pledge to abandon its nuclear, chemical and biological weapons efforts, the Bush administration said Friday that it was lifting many of the sanctions it had used to pressure the North African nation and was increasing diplomatic contacts. As a result, the White House said, most commerce between U.S. firms and Libya will be permitted. The United States, Britain and Libya announced Dec. 19 that Col.
Advertisement
NEWS
June 23, 1996 | TYLER MARSHALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Leaders of the 15-nation European Union expressed "deep concern" Saturday over recent U.S. congressional actions that threaten to impose sanctions against foreign companies trading with Cuba, Libya or Iran. In a communique issued at the end of a two-day summit here, they reserved the right to retaliate against the U.S. to defend their own interests.
NEWS
June 23, 1996 | TYLER MARSHALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Leaders of the 15-nation European Union expressed "deep concern" Saturday over recent U.S. congressional actions that threaten to impose sanctions against foreign companies trading with Cuba, Libya or Iran. In a communique issued at the end of a two-day summit here, they reserved the right to retaliate against the U.S. to defend their own interests.
NEWS
April 25, 1996 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The European Union is ready to launch a trade war against the United States if Congress enacts legislation, already passed by the Senate, to impose trade sanctions on foreign companies doing business with the Iranian or Libyan oil and gas industries, a French diplomat warned Wednesday. "We have made it clear that we would not accept this situation without going to retaliatory action against American companies," the diplomat told a small group of reporters.
NEWS
July 17, 1990 | KIM MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Leaders of the 17-month-old Arab Maghreb Union will meet Saturday in Algiers to advance plans for a North African common market that would parallel the more unified European Community upcoming by the end of 1992. Substantial progress is considered possible on an agreement to eliminate trade barriers and customs duties, allowing free circulation of goods among the five Maghreb countries--Algeria, Libya, Mauritania, Morocco and Tunisia.
NEWS
September 28, 1986 | Associated Press
Libya will replace money with a system of barter, Libyan television has reported. In a report monitored in London, the state television network quoted the official Jana news agency as saying the system of barter will be adopted in accordance with Col. Moammar Kadafi's "Green Book," in which the Libyan leader has set down his political philosophy. "This will end dealings in money, which will become a unit of measurement only," the Friday evening broadcast quoted Jana as saying.
NEWS
January 12, 1986 | JAMES GERSTENZANG, Times Staff Writer
President Reagan, drawing attention to the European allies' reluctance to support his effort to place Libya in economic isolation, suggested in remarks made public Saturday that nations continuing to deal with Libya are placing trade above morality.
NEWS
January 8, 1986 | JACK NELSON, Times Washington Bureau Chief
President Reagan, denouncing Libyan leader Moammar Kadafi as "a pariah in the world community" for his support of terrorism, Tuesday ordered all Americans to leave the North African country and directed U.S. companies to break off all economic dealings with it or face criminal prosecution by the United States. In a toughly worded statement at the outset of a nationally televised news conference, Reagan declared a "national emergency" to deal with what he called a threat to U.S.
WORLD
April 24, 2004 | James Gerstenzang and Paul Richter, Times Staff Writers
Signaling that it believes Libya is upholding its pledge to abandon its nuclear, chemical and biological weapons efforts, the Bush administration said Friday that it was lifting many of the sanctions it had used to pressure the North African nation and was increasing diplomatic contacts. As a result, the White House said, most commerce between U.S. firms and Libya will be permitted. The United States, Britain and Libya announced Dec. 19 that Col.
NEWS
April 25, 1996 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The European Union is ready to launch a trade war against the United States if Congress enacts legislation, already passed by the Senate, to impose trade sanctions on foreign companies doing business with the Iranian or Libyan oil and gas industries, a French diplomat warned Wednesday. "We have made it clear that we would not accept this situation without going to retaliatory action against American companies," the diplomat told a small group of reporters.
NEWS
July 17, 1990 | KIM MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Leaders of the 17-month-old Arab Maghreb Union will meet Saturday in Algiers to advance plans for a North African common market that would parallel the more unified European Community upcoming by the end of 1992. Substantial progress is considered possible on an agreement to eliminate trade barriers and customs duties, allowing free circulation of goods among the five Maghreb countries--Algeria, Libya, Mauritania, Morocco and Tunisia.
NEWS
December 20, 1988
The United States said it is very concerned about a Libyan chemical arms plant and urged all nations to halt the sale of technologies and chemicals that could help Tripoli produce poison gas. "The U.S. believes that Libya has established (chemical weapons) production capability and is on the verge of full-scale production of these weapons," State Department spokeswoman Phyllis Oakley said. Such production would be troubling, she said, because of the "regime's support for terrorism."
NEWS
September 28, 1986 | Associated Press
Libya will replace money with a system of barter, Libyan television has reported. In a report monitored in London, the state television network quoted the official Jana news agency as saying the system of barter will be adopted in accordance with Col. Moammar Kadafi's "Green Book," in which the Libyan leader has set down his political philosophy. "This will end dealings in money, which will become a unit of measurement only," the Friday evening broadcast quoted Jana as saying.
NEWS
January 12, 1986 | JAMES GERSTENZANG, Times Staff Writer
President Reagan, drawing attention to the European allies' reluctance to support his effort to place Libya in economic isolation, suggested in remarks made public Saturday that nations continuing to deal with Libya are placing trade above morality.
NEWS
January 8, 1986 | JACK NELSON, Times Washington Bureau Chief
President Reagan, denouncing Libyan leader Moammar Kadafi as "a pariah in the world community" for his support of terrorism, Tuesday ordered all Americans to leave the North African country and directed U.S. companies to break off all economic dealings with it or face criminal prosecution by the United States. In a toughly worded statement at the outset of a nationally televised news conference, Reagan declared a "national emergency" to deal with what he called a threat to U.S.
WORLD
July 25, 2004 | From Times Wire Reports
North Korea dismissed as "nothing but a sham offer" U.S. proposals that the communist state follow the example of Libya and scrap its nuclear weapons in exchange for aid and diplomatic recognition. The United States laid out a plan for North Korea last month that would give the impoverished state multilateral energy aid after it commits to dismantling all of its nuclear programs and begins a verifiable disarmament process. U.S.
NEWS
September 5, 1985
Tunisia has halted all cooperation with Libya, including trade relations, as the result of Libya's expulsion of about 30,000 Tunisian workers during the past month, Premier Mohammed Mzali announced in Tunis. Stopping short of a complete break in diplomatic ties, Mzali said he has decided to recall the remaining 60,000 workers and demanded that Libya reimburse those ousted earlier for any confiscated possessions.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|