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Libya Trade West Germany

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NEWS
January 11, 1989 | From Reuters
The Bonn government, troubled by U.S. allegations that West German companies helped Moammar Kadafi build a chemical weapons plant, said Tuesday that it had ordered several firms to end current deals with Libya. The West German Cabinet also agreed to tighten controls of exports to sensitive areas and planned heavy fines and prison sentences of up to five years for businessmen violating export laws.
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NEWS
June 28, 1990 | From Associated Press
A West German businessman was convicted and sentenced to five years in prison on Wednesday for helping Libya build a plant the court said was "clearly intended" to produce chemical weapons. Juergen Hippenstiel-Imhausen, described by prosecutors as a "merchant of death," was found guilty by a state court in Mannheim of violating West German export laws. He was also found guilty on charges of tax evasion of $11.7 million.
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NEWS
March 10, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
West German government sources confirmed that Bonn has evidence that Libya produced 30 tons of mustard gas in a test at a chemical plant built with assistance from West German companies. "We passed on the information to Washington in February," a senior government source said.
NEWS
March 23, 1990 | From Times Wire Services
A controversial factory in Libya damaged by fire last week was designed solely for making chemical weapons, West Germany said Thursday after an official investigation. The public prosecutor's office in Mannheim also said in a statement that a West German businessman was indicted on charges he helped build the Libyan plant, which the United States has insisted produced chemical weapons.
NEWS
February 14, 1989
West Germany's foreign intelligence agency first learned of a possible West German business role in a Libyan poison gas project in 1980, government sources said in Bonn. They said the agency provided regular reports on the project and signs of West German involvement to the Bonn government for years afterward. The information gathered throughout the 1980s is included in a chronology of the Libya affair to be presented to Parliament on Wednesday by Chancellery Minister Wolfgang Schaeuble.
NEWS
January 27, 1989 | From Associated Press
Investigators Thursday released the names of two more companies whose records were seized in a widening probe of suspected West German involvement in the building of a purported poison gas factory in Libya. Customs authorities on Wednesday searched the offices of three firms and the homes of 12 individuals on suspicion that export laws had been violated.
NEWS
January 7, 1989 | WILLIAM TUOHY, Times Staff Writer
Chancellor Helmut Kohl has complained to the U.S. government about accusations in the American media that West German companies helped to build a chemical weapons plant in Libya, his chief spokesman said Friday. "The West German government regards the form and content of the discussion being carried out through parts of the U.S. media as unhelpful," said spokesman Friedhelm Ost at a news conference.
NEWS
June 28, 1990 | From Associated Press
A West German businessman was convicted and sentenced to five years in prison on Wednesday for helping Libya build a plant the court said was "clearly intended" to produce chemical weapons. Juergen Hippenstiel-Imhausen, described by prosecutors as a "merchant of death," was found guilty by a state court in Mannheim of violating West German export laws. He was also found guilty on charges of tax evasion of $11.7 million.
NEWS
January 16, 1988 | Associated Press
Police on Friday sealed off a nuclear processing plant where authorities investigated reports the operator broke an international treaty by shipping weapons-grade nuclear material to Libya and Pakistan. Authorities said the international police organization, Interpol, and the Swedish government also were looking into reports the alleged shipments passed through Sweden.
NEWS
March 23, 1990 | From Times Wire Services
A controversial factory in Libya damaged by fire last week was designed solely for making chemical weapons, West Germany said Thursday after an official investigation. The public prosecutor's office in Mannheim also said in a statement that a West German businessman was indicted on charges he helped build the Libyan plant, which the United States has insisted produced chemical weapons.
NEWS
March 10, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
West German government sources confirmed that Bonn has evidence that Libya produced 30 tons of mustard gas in a test at a chemical plant built with assistance from West German companies. "We passed on the information to Washington in February," a senior government source said.
NEWS
February 14, 1989
West Germany's foreign intelligence agency first learned of a possible West German business role in a Libyan poison gas project in 1980, government sources said in Bonn. They said the agency provided regular reports on the project and signs of West German involvement to the Bonn government for years afterward. The information gathered throughout the 1980s is included in a chronology of the Libya affair to be presented to Parliament on Wednesday by Chancellery Minister Wolfgang Schaeuble.
NEWS
January 27, 1989 | From Associated Press
Investigators Thursday released the names of two more companies whose records were seized in a widening probe of suspected West German involvement in the building of a purported poison gas factory in Libya. Customs authorities on Wednesday searched the offices of three firms and the homes of 12 individuals on suspicion that export laws had been violated.
NEWS
January 11, 1989 | From Reuters
The Bonn government, troubled by U.S. allegations that West German companies helped Moammar Kadafi build a chemical weapons plant, said Tuesday that it had ordered several firms to end current deals with Libya. The West German Cabinet also agreed to tighten controls of exports to sensitive areas and planned heavy fines and prison sentences of up to five years for businessmen violating export laws.
NEWS
January 7, 1989 | WILLIAM TUOHY, Times Staff Writer
Chancellor Helmut Kohl has complained to the U.S. government about accusations in the American media that West German companies helped to build a chemical weapons plant in Libya, his chief spokesman said Friday. "The West German government regards the form and content of the discussion being carried out through parts of the U.S. media as unhelpful," said spokesman Friedhelm Ost at a news conference.
NEWS
January 16, 1988 | Associated Press
Police on Friday sealed off a nuclear processing plant where authorities investigated reports the operator broke an international treaty by shipping weapons-grade nuclear material to Libya and Pakistan. Authorities said the international police organization, Interpol, and the Swedish government also were looking into reports the alleged shipments passed through Sweden.
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