Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsLibya
IN THE NEWS

Libya

WORLD
December 22, 2013 | By Mohamed Juma
BENGHAZI, Libya -- A suicide car bombing at a security checkpoint in eastern Libya on Sunday killed at least 13 people, the government said -- a gruesome attack that left body parts strewn across a roadway. Officials declared three days of mourning. The powerful explosion took place in Bersis, about 30 miles from the increasingly restive city of Benghazi. An American schoolteacher was killed in the city earlier this month, and it was the scene of the September 2012 attack on the American consulate that killed the U.S. ambassador to Libya, J. Christopher Stevens.
Advertisement
WORLD
December 5, 2013 | By Mohamed Juma and Laura King
BENGHAZI, Libya -- Relatively few Americans remained in this eastern Libyan city as street battles raged and Islamic militants made ever-bolder forays in recent weeks. But Ronnie Smith, a chemistry teacher at an English-language school, stayed on, planning, colleagues said, to return soon to the United States for the Christmas holidays. Smith, 33, from Texas, was gunned down Thursday by an unknown assailant or assailants as he jogged in an affluent central neighborhood of Benghazi, not far from the U.S. Consulate where an attack last September killed Ambassador J. Christopher Stevens and three other Americans.
WORLD
December 5, 2013 | By Mohamed Juma and Laura King
BENGHAZI, Libya -- An American chemistry teacher was shot to death while out jogging Thursday, according to colleagues and officials at the English-language school where he taught. The shooting took place not far from the U.S. Consulate in Benghazi where Ambassador J. Christopher Stevens died, along with three other Americans, in an attack in September 2012. Administrators at the International School identified the teacher as Ronnie Smith, 33, from Texas, who had arrived in Libya late last year.
WORLD
December 5, 2013 | By Maria L. La Ganga and Molly Hennessy-Fiske
Logan Gentry said his friend Ronnie Smith, who was fatally shot while jogging in Benghazi, Libya, on Thursday, did not fear his experience abroad. Smith, 33, joked with everyone, while also caring for others and looking for ways to serve them, Gentry said. “He didn't like the heightened violence [in Libya] at all, but he wasn't afraid,” Gentry said in an email. “Part of me wonders, 'Why were you out running in that environment?' But he would probably say, 'Why not?' He enjoyed life and feared very little.
WORLD
December 5, 2013 | By Mohamed Juma and Laura King
BENGHAZI, Libya - Relatively few Americans remained in this eastern Libyan city as street battles raged and Islamic militants made ever-bolder forays in recent weeks. But Ronnie Smith, a chemistry teacher at an English-language school, stayed on, planning, colleagues said, to return soon to the United States for Christmas. Smith, 33, of Texas was gunned down Thursday by an unknown assailant or assailants as he jogged in an affluent central neighborhood of Benghazi, not far from the U.S. Consulate where an attack in September 2012 killed Ambassador J. Christopher Stevens and three other Americans.
OPINION
December 4, 2013
Re "The Benghazi syndrome," Opinion, Dec. 1 Mieczyslaw P. Boduszynski's article calls to mind my experience in Tunisia last month and demonstrates why the U.S. government should consider more substantial cultural and educational engagement in North Africa. Like the author in Libya, when I was in Tunisia, I spoke with Tunisians from all walks of life. I visited museums and historic monuments. I spoke with professors, students, government representatives and private directors of arts programs.
OPINION
December 1, 2013 | By Mieczyslaw P. Boduszynski
Sen. Lindsey Graham and others on Capitol Hill are demanding further inquiries into the attack on the U.S. diplomatic mission in Benghazi, Libya, apparently convinced that the Obama administration is withholding crucial information. But I often wonder whether Graham (R-S.C.) and others who exploit the Benghazi issue to attack the president realize that their politicking affects the ability of American diplomats to carry out their work. I served as a U.S. Foreign Service officer in Libya before, during and after the attack, and I saw firsthand how playing politics with Benghazi directly hurts our interests in Libya and beyond.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 18, 2013 | By Jessica Gelt
Former "CBS Evening News" anchor Dan Rather participated in a media conference call Thursday to discuss AXS TV's one-hour special, "My Days in Dallas: A Remembrance With Dan Rather," which premieres Monday at 5 p.m. PST. Talk of the chaotic events surrounding the assassination of President Kennedy dominated the call, but Rather was also asked questions about CBS' handling of the botched "60 Minutes" Benghazi, Libya, segment, as well as about CBS'...
ENTERTAINMENT
November 8, 2013 | By Meredith Blake
Following a rash of criticism, Lara Logan has apologized for an inaccurate "60 Minutes" report on the Sept. 11, 2012, attack on the U.S. special mission in Libya. "We were wrong," she told co-hosts Norah O'Donnell and Jeff Glor in an Friday appearance on "CBS This Morning. " The correspondent explained how she and producers had been misled by a key source, Dylan Davies, known by the pseudonym Morgan Jones. PHOTOS: Celebrities by The Times In the controversial story, which aired Oct. 27, Davies, the manager of the local guard force at the mission in Benghazi, claimed he saw the body of Ambassador Chris Stevens in a local hospital and that he'd had an encounter with one of the attackers.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 7, 2013 | By Scott Collins, This post has been corrected. See the note below for details.
Looks like "60 Minutes" is getting ready to walk away from at least part of Lara Logan's controversial Benghazi report. The CBS newsmagazine featured a segment last month about the deadly attack on the U.S. mission in Libya, which happened on the 11th anniversary of the 9/11 terrorist attacks. The CBS newsmagazine and Logan herself had been staunchly defending the segment for days against critics who argued that a key source -- British security expert Dylan Davies, a.k.a. "Morgan Jones" -- may not have been telling the truth.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|