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Libyan Leader Moammar Kadafi

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WORLD
July 10, 2011 | By David Zucchino, Los Angeles Times
For the second time in a week, Libyan leader Moammar Kadafi has threatened to dispatch hundreds of Libyan suicide bombers to attack targets in Europe in retaliation for NATO strikes against his regime. "Hundreds of Libyans will martyr in Europe," Kadafi said late Friday in a defiant speech before thousands of Libyans in Tripoli's Green Square. "I told you it is eye for an eye and tooth for a tooth. " The latest threats came as pro-government forces launched a counterattack on rebels attempting to push toward Tripoli, the capital, from their enclave in the port city of Misurata, 125 miles to the east.
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NEWS
October 20, 2011 | By Kim Geiger, Washington Bureau
Sen. John Kerry, who joined Sen. John McCain earlier this year in supporting the use of force to assist the Libyan rebels, praised the U.S. role in the conflict Thursday as deposed Libyan leader Moammar Kadafi was reported dead. Kadafi's death is a development that “marks the end of his reign of terror and the promise of a new Libya,” the Massachusetts Democrat said in a statement. Kerry, who was an early supporter of the NATO mission in Libya, cast Kadafi's death as “a victory for multilateralism and successful coalition-building in defiance of those who derided NATO and predicted a very different outcome.” PHOTOS: Moammar Kadafi | 1942 - 2011 “The United States demonstrated clear-eyed leadership, patience, and foresight by pushing the international community into action after Qaddafi promised a massacre,” he said in a statement.
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NEWS
January 5, 1989 | JOHN M. BRODER, Times Staff Writer
U.S. Navy jets, while on training exercises over the Mediterranean on Wednesday, shot down two Libyan MIG-23 fighters when the Libyans appeared to threaten the U.S. warplanes, American officials said. The incident, which occurred about noon local time (2 a.m. PST) in international airspace, comes at a time of increasing U.S. hostility toward Libya over that nation's construction of what U.S. officials charge is a chemical weapons plant near the Libyan capital of Tripoli.
WORLD
October 3, 2011 | By Ruth Sherlock, Los Angeles Times
As fighters loyal to Libya's revolutionary government gain on the holdout city of Surt, residents are making it clear that the battle for hearts and minds is far from won. The scrublands that surround Moammar Kadafi's hometown have become a confused patchwork of loyalties. As vehicles of the revolutionary forces patrolled the dusty villages in newly seized territory Sunday, many residents peered angrily from their homes. "The rebels are worse than rats. NATO is the same as Osama bin Laden," said a father, his seven children crowding around him. Surt has been a primary target in the seven-month NATO bombing campaign that helped rebel forces gain control of most of Libya.
NEWS
February 28, 2011 | By James Oliphant and Christi Parsons, Washington Bureau
WASHINGTON -- Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton on Monday denounced Libyan leader Moammar Kadafi for using "mercenaries and thugs" against his own people and called on the embattled ruler to step down immediately. She said the Obama administration was considering every option against Kadafi and that nothing was "off the table. " Addressing the United Nations Human Rights Council in Geneva, Clinton said governments of the world must support the push for democracy in the Middle East.
WORLD
April 11, 2011 | By Ned Parker and Borzou Daragahi, Los Angeles Times
South African President Jacob Zuma said Sunday that Libyan leader Moammar Kadafi had accepted a "road map" for ending the conflict that pits his forces against rebels determined to end his four-decade rule. Zuma, who according to news reports led a delegation of African Union leaders in a meeting with Kadafi at his compound in Tripoli, did not disclose details of the cease-fire proposal. He also didn't specify whether Kadafi himself or his adjutants had accepted the African Union plan.
WORLD
May 16, 2011 | By Patrick J. McDonnell and Ned Parker, Los Angeles Times
Prosecutors asked judges of the International Criminal Court on Monday to issue arrest warrants for Libyan leader Moammar Kadafi, his son and brother-in-law, further isolating the autocratic ruler who has proved hard to dislodge despite NATO airstrikes and popular uprisings. A legal brief presented to the judges accused the three of crimes against humanity in the killing of civilians as an effort to crush demonstrations they feared would unseat them, as happened with longtime rulers in neighboring Egypt and Tunisia.
WORLD
September 4, 2011 | By Patrick J. McDonnell and Ken Dilanian, Los Angeles Times
The sometimes odd contortions of U.S. policy in the Islamic world have seen a new twist in the strange case of Abdel-Hakim Belhadj. A few years ago, documents show, Belhadj was a wanted Islamic militant whom the CIA handed over for "debriefing" to the government of Libyan leader Moammar Kadafi, then an ally in the fight against terrorism. Today, Belhadj is a top military commander in the provisional Libyan government and Kadafi is on the run, his government toppled, in part, by U.S. and allied airstrikes.
NEWS
May 15, 1985 | From Reuters
Libyan leader Moammar Kadafi on Tuesday began his first visit to Burundi since the two countries signed a cooperation treaty in 1973.
NEWS
January 12, 1990 | Reuters
A summit meeting of five North African leaders has been postponed for a second time after Libyan leader Moammar Kadafi said he could not make the dates favored by King Hassan of Morocco. An official announcement here Wednesday night said the heads of state will now meet in Tunis from Jan. 21 to Jan. 23.
WORLD
September 17, 2011 | By Patrick J. McDonnell, Los Angeles Times
Forces loyal to ousted Libyan leader Moammar Kadafi put up fierce resistance Friday on two fronts, fending off revolutionary fighters trying to take a pair of holdout cities that have defied the nation's new transitional government. Anti-Kadafi fighters launched major attacks on Surt, the coastal town where Kadafi was born, and Bani Walid, a desert city that benefited from the longtime leader's financial largesse. But in both cases the attackers' predictions of quick and decisive victories proved wrong.
WORLD
September 4, 2011 | By Patrick J. McDonnell and Ken Dilanian, Los Angeles Times
The sometimes odd contortions of U.S. policy in the Islamic world have seen a new twist in the strange case of Abdel-Hakim Belhadj. A few years ago, documents show, Belhadj was a wanted Islamic militant whom the CIA handed over for "debriefing" to the government of Libyan leader Moammar Kadafi, then an ally in the fight against terrorism. Today, Belhadj is a top military commander in the provisional Libyan government and Kadafi is on the run, his government toppled, in part, by U.S. and allied airstrikes.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 1, 2011 | By Ben Fritz, Los Angeles Times
These days Saadi Kadafi is on the run, presumably somewhere in North Africa, dodging the rebels who ended his father's 42-year-long dictatorship in Libya. But just two years ago this month, the 38-year-old third son of Moammar Kadafi was perched on a couch surrounded by Champagne bottles, holding court at a glittering rooftop party at the Toronto International Film Festival. As rapper 50 Cent performed and guests sampled Beluga caviar, Kadafi and his American partner, Matty Beckerman, schmoozed with agents to promote themselves as the newest players in the world of independent filmmaking.
WORLD
August 26, 2011 | By Borzou Daragahi, Los Angeles Times
Fighting continued in the Libyan capital Thursday as rebel forces pressed the search for the country's longtime ruler, Moammar Kadafi, who was dislodged from his command-and-control center this week and remains in hiding. Rebels who overran the city and all but toppled Kadafi's decades-long rule said they had a group of Kadafi loyalists surrounded in an apartment building close to his Bab Azizya compound, which was ransacked by lightly armed rebel forces following a rapid advance from three directions on the capital.
OPINION
August 23, 2011
The international campaign against Libyan leader Moammar Kadafi is on the verge of a historic achievement: The judicious use of force by Western nations has given that nation's rebellion the opportunity to eliminate a longtime scourge. And yet the experience of Libya, though it ushers out an unstable ruler, offers an uncertain model for U.S. foreign policy. The use of force to address the internal abominations of other nations raises profoundly difficult questions for American policymakers.
WORLD
July 28, 2011 | By Janet Stobart, Los Angeles Times
Britain has ordered the Libyan Embassy's remaining staff members to leave the country and has recognized the Libyan rebels' ruling council as the only official representative of the North African nation, Foreign Secretary William Hague told a televised news conference Wednesday. The eight staff members will follow Libyan Ambassador Omar Jelban, who was expelled in May. Five other embassy personnel, including the military attache, were ordered out in March. Hague stressed the British government's support for the rebel Transitional National Council's struggle to oust Libyan leader Moammar Kadafi, declaring: "The Libyan people can be assured that we will remain on their side for as long as it takes.
NEWS
April 3, 1988
A Libyan army officer has defected and denounced Libyan leader Moammar Kadafi, an organization of Libyan exiles said in a statement. The statement was distributed by the Cairo-based National Front for the Salvation of Libya. It said Libyan Lt. Col. Abdallah Ahmed Khaled Sheikhy had joined the front because it is "the honorable force struggling to overthrow Kadafi's bloody rule." The statement was not signed, and the claim could not be verified.
WORLD
July 19, 2011 | By David Zucchino, Los Angeles Times
Rajab Zawiyeh, a Libyan businessman, drove to this coastal rebel stronghold two days after he heard about an outbreak of fighting in the nearby oil city of Port Brega. Zawiyeh's 25-year-old son, Imad, was fighting at the front, and he feared for the young man's safety. Monday morning, he got a cellphone call: His son had been wounded. Zawiyeh, 57, sped to the main Ajdabiya hospital, where he found his son's bloodied face swathed in gauze. A stained bandage was wrapped around his leg. A rocket fired by government forces had exploded yards from Imad just outside Port Brega, where rebel forces were in the fifth day of an assault designed to retake the strategic city.
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