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NEWS
August 24, 1999 | From Times Wire Reports
Scottish prosecutors assured relatives of Pan Am 103 victims at a meeting in Washington, D.C., that "no deals" have been made and two Libyans will be prosecuted vigorously on charges they carried out the 1988 bombing over Lockerbie, Scotland. Nearly 200 relatives attended a private meeting to receive updates on preparations being made for the trial next February against alleged Libyan agents accused of planting a suitcase bomb on the Pan Am jetliner.
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WORLD
March 17, 2014 | By Laura King
CAIRO - Did a charismatic Libyan rebel chieftain with big ambitions overreach? Trying to put a $36-million cargo of crude oil on the black market was an extraordinarily bold move by Ibrahim Jathran, a militia commander whose fighters played a role in the NATO-backed rebellion three years ago against longtime dictator Moammar Kadafi. In the early hours Monday, Jathran lost his gamble when U.S. Navy SEALs seized control of the tanker Morning Glory, which sailed a week ago from an oil port in eastern Libya.
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WORLD
March 4, 2011 | By David Zucchino, Los Angeles Times
About a dozen African men stood lined along a hallway of the courthouse in the eastern city of Benghazi. The men were suspected of being mercenaries fighting on behalf of Libyan leader Moammar Kadafi and had been rousted from their homes in the morning, turned in by residents responding to a rebel campaign urging them to report "suspicious people. " We are construction workers, one of the men said, pleading his innocence to a Times reporter visiting the courthouse, which now serves as the headquarters of the rebel government.
WORLD
March 11, 2014 | By Laura King and Amro Hassan
CAIRO -- Libyan Prime Minister Ali Zeidan was ousted Tuesday in a parliamentary vote of no confidence on the heels of a confrontation with a breakaway militia that sought to bypass the weak government and sell oil on its own. Lawmakers named the defense minister to act as prime minister until a replacement for Zeidan is found. Zeidan had been struggling for months to keep control of a fractured and impotent central administration in the North African state, which faces growing chaos in the wake of Moammar Kadafi's overthrow three years ago. Rebel commanders have struck out on their own, with armed groups -- sometimes loosely affiliated with the government and drawing pay for that nominal alliance -- wielding far more power than the state.
WORLD
February 27, 2011 | By Raja Abdulrahim, Los Angeles Times
For all the rowdy anti-government protests and people saying they're ready for martyrdom, the fear that Moammar Kadafi has sown for 41 years doesn't disappear in the few seconds it takes to fire off a round of celebratory gunfire. That lingering dread is most obvious in Kadafi-controlled cities in western Libya, where news is scarce because people are reluctant to talk on the phone, lest his security is listening. But even in Benghazi, an eastern city free of militia and mercenary forces, a man giving interviews at the courthouse refused to give his real name, saying there were still pro-Kadafi supporters and spies in the city.
WORLD
July 7, 2012 | By Glen Johnson, Los Angeles Times
TRIPOLI, Libya — Naima Naggar stood in a Tripoli polling station Saturday, her index finger stained with indelible ink as she voted in Libya's first free elections in decades hoping to heal tribal divisions and bring this battered nation closer to democracy. She and other Libyans voted in high spirits to move beyond last year's civil war and the late Moammar Kadafi's 42-year repressive rule. Yet distrust and tension hang over the country, which has been marked by lawlessness and political schisms fueled by heavily armed militias.
NEWS
April 14, 1992
U.N. sanctions descend on Libya Wednesday unless Col. Moammar Kadafi gives up two Libyan suspects in the terrorist bombing of Pan American Flight 103 over Lockerbie, Scotland in 1988. While crying out defiance, Kadafi also has been sending out emissaries to U.N. Secretary General Boutros Boutros-Ghali and the Arab League in a desperate campaign to avert sanctions. But his vague proposals to allow the suspects to go to trial in a disinterested country or in some U.N. body fall far short of the U.
NEWS
April 6, 1986 | Associated Press
The French government expelled two Libyan diplomats Saturday, saying that they had been in contact with terrorists who were likely to attack American targets in France. The Interior Ministry also said that a Tunisian and an Algerian were expelled last week as part of the same anti-terrorist intelligence operation involving the Libyans. One report said U.S. embassy or consular targets were involved.
NEWS
March 7, 1999 | Reuters
Libyan leader Moammar Kadafi discussed his Lockerbie impasse with the West on Saturday in talks with Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak that are expected to last at least one more day, presidential sources said. Kadafi will hold a news conference at the end of his talks with Mubarak on Monday, Egyptian Information Minister Safwat Sharif said. The Libyan leader is due to leave Egypt on Friday. There was no further word about the progress of the talks. The U.N.
WORLD
July 16, 2011 | By David Zucchino, Los Angeles Times
Every morning, Salah Fatour is at his post with his worn rake and wheelbarrow, tending the garden of the dead. In a city besieged by war, he finds peace among the graves of a long-ago conflict. He steps gently around the whitewashed tombstones, pulling a weed, caressing a flower, careful not to disturb the souls of soldiers who died on foreign soil seven decades ago. Fatour, his rough hands calloused from raking, performs the sacred duties once carried out by his father, who tended the Benghazi War Cemetery for three decades after World War II. Fatour, who was born at the cemetery, has maintained it for 25 years, preserving the memories of the dead.
WORLD
March 9, 2014 | By Laura King and Amro Hassan
CAIRO -- Confrontation deepened Sunday between Libya's weak central government and a rebel militia that has launched a brazen bid to sell crude oil and seize the profits for itself. The episode was emblematic of the chaos that has beset the North African nation in the three years since the toppling and killing of strongman Moammar Kadafi. But this latest crisis -- centered on oil, the country's economic mainstay -- appeared to mark the most serious challenge yet to the splintered interim administration, threatening a full-scale unraveling of a state that scarcely exists in more than name.
OPINION
December 1, 2013 | By Mieczyslaw P. Boduszynski
Sen. Lindsey Graham and others on Capitol Hill are demanding further inquiries into the attack on the U.S. diplomatic mission in Benghazi, Libya, apparently convinced that the Obama administration is withholding crucial information. But I often wonder whether Graham (R-S.C.) and others who exploit the Benghazi issue to attack the president realize that their politicking affects the ability of American diplomats to carry out their work. I served as a U.S. Foreign Service officer in Libya before, during and after the attack, and I saw firsthand how playing politics with Benghazi directly hurts our interests in Libya and beyond.
NATIONAL
October 15, 2013 | By Tina Susman
NEW YORK--Nine days after U.S. forces nabbed him in a secret raid in Libya, the terrorism suspect known as Abu Amas al Liby has arrived in New York to face charges in the 1998 U.S. embassy bombings in Africa and could make his first court appearance Wednesday. Al Liby, whose real name is Nazih Abdul-Hamed Ruqai, was brought to New York over the weekend after several days of interrogation on a U.S. Navy ship, where he had been held since being captured in Tripoli, the Libyan capital.
NATIONAL
October 15, 2013 | By Tina Susman
NEW YORK - A Libyan accused of helping Al Qaeda orchestrate the bombings of U.S. embassies in Africa in 1998 pleaded not guilty to terrorism charges Tuesday, his first appearance in a case highlighting the Obama administration's push to use civilian courts rather than the Guantanamo Bay military prison and drone strikes to nail high-profile terrorism suspects. The defendant, Abu Anas al Liby, whose real name is Nazih Abdul-Hamed Ruqai, entered the courtroom in Manhattan looking far more gaunt than he did in the "wanted" picture circulated by the FBI after his indictment 13 years ago. With sunken eyes, hollow cheeks and a bushy gray and red beard, he appeared older than his 49 years.
NATIONAL
October 15, 2013 | By Tina Susman
Accused Libyan terrorist Abu Anas al Liby pleaded not guilty in federal court in New York on Tuesday to charges of conspiring to kill U.S. citizens in connection with the U.S. embassy bombings in Africa in 1998. Al Liby , whose real name is Nazih Abdul Hamed Ruqai, entered his plea 10 days after being grabbed by American forces during a secret raid in the Libyan capital of Tripoli. In court he said he preferred to be referred to as Ruqai rather than by his nom de guerre. Ruqai entered the tightly secured courtroom in lower Manhattan with his hands cuffed behind his back.
NATIONAL
October 14, 2013 | By David G. Savage
WASHINGTON - U.S. prosecutors say they will bring a captured Libyan terrorism suspect before a judge in New York on Tuesday in a test of the Obama administration's stepped-up effort to use criminal trials, not drone strikes and military prisons, to punish international terrorists. Abu Anas al Liby has been indicted with 20 other accused Al Qaeda operatives on charges of conspiring to kill Americans in the 1998 bombings of the U.S. embassies in Kenya and Tanzania. A computer expert, he was said to have assembled photographs of the embassies that were used by the bombers.
NEWS
November 14, 1991 | RONE TEMPEST, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Libyan government Wednesday invited the French judge who recently accused senior Libyan officials of masterminding the 1989 bombing of a French airliner to visit Libya so they can answer his charges. Attorneys representing the Libyan government said they will guarantee the safety of the investigative magistrate, Jean-Louis Bruguiere, if he goes to Libya.
NEWS
April 18, 1986 | JAMES GERSTENZANG, Times Staff Writer
Displaying fresh aerial reconnaissance photographs and dramatic videotapes shot by the first U.S. warplane to bomb the Tripoli barracks where Libyan leader Moammar Kadafi's headquarters are situated, the Pentagon said Thursday that "major damage" was inflicted on all five targets in the raid.
WORLD
October 10, 2013 | By Laura King, This post has been updated. See the note below for details.
CAIRO -- Libya slipped deeper into turmoil Thursday when gunmen staged a brief but brazen abduction of the country's prime minister, storming into a luxury hotel in the capital, Tripoli, and seizing him. He was freed hours later, Libya's state-run news agency reported. The circumstances of Prime Minister Ali Zidan's release were not immediately clear. [Updated, 7:53 a.m. PDT Oct. 10: At a Cabinet meeting following his release, Zidan thanked the "real revolutionaries " who helped to free him but provided no details, according to the BBC. ]
WORLD
October 9, 2013 | By Times Staff
Libyan Prime Minister Ali Zidan was seized by armed men and taken from a hotel in Tripoli, the capital, according to news reports early Thursday. The Reuters news agency cited two Arab-language television stations , Sky News Arabia and Al Arabiya, both based in the United Arab Emirates, that first reported the apparent kidnapping. Al Arabiya said on its English-language site that the Libyan government had confirmed the reports. The BBC also said the government had confirmed the reports and that Zidan had been taken to an undisclosed location by a group of men who were believed to be former rebels.
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