Advertisement
 
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsLice
IN THE NEWS

Lice

FEATURED ARTICLES
HEALTH
October 4, 2010 | Joe Graedon, Teresa Graedon, The People's Pharmacy
My daughter ended up with lice several weeks ago. We treated her with lice shampoo twice and did every-other-day comb-outs. I also vacuumed, cleaned, washed and dried all her bedding and clothing. The first time I treated her, I combed out hundreds of nits and about a half-dozen bugs. A week later with the second shampoo, I combed out three bugs and maybe a dozen nits. A week later, I did the Listerine treatment. I combed out one bug and probably about half a dozen nits. After another week of treating with Listerine, I have found no nits and no bugs.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NATIONAL
December 15, 2013 | By John M. Glionna
LOVELOCK, Nev. - For years, school nurse Deborah Pontius came to work with nits to pick. On some days in this isolated central Nevada town, she'd actually sift through the hair of students found with live head lice. But something bigger bugged her: the district's policy of sending children home when they were infested with head lice - grayish-white insects that suck blood from the scalp and cause severe itching. Pontius saw stricken students miss weeks of school. A reentry ticket involved painstaking inspections, with parents required to prove that not a single hitchhiker resided on a child's head.
Advertisement
SCIENCE
December 15, 2007 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Infestations of sea lice at salmon farms on Canada's west coast are threatening local wild pink salmon populations and could result in their extinction in four years, Canadian researchers said Thursday. Scientists collected nearly four decades of data on the numbers of pink salmon in rivers along the central coast of British Columbia, comparing the wild populations exposed to salmon farms to those not exposed.
HEALTH
August 30, 2013 | By Jessica Ogilvie
As children return to school this fall, parents likewise return to worrying about ailments, both physical and emotional, that might befall their children on their way to - and in - the classroom. Whether it's bullying or head lice, thinking about what could go wrong can be overwhelming. But not all school-related issues are created equal. In order to maintain their own sanity and the sanity of their kids, parents should try to think objectively about what issues truly warrant their attention.
SCIENCE
April 10, 2011 | By Amina Khan, Los Angeles Times
The lowly louse may have a more impressive pedigree than once thought: Dinosaurs may have hosted the parasitic bugs, a study says. The findings, published Tuesday in the journal Biology Letters, also show — through comparison of lice — that mammals and birds may have begun to flourish before the dinosaurs went extinct 65 million years ago. That's counter to a long-held idea that they only ascended and diversified once the dinosaurs were gone....
HEALTH
December 12, 2005 | Shari Roan
The treatments for head lice aren't pleasant: potentially toxic chemicals, repeated combing for nits, and laundering sheets, clothing and towels. But a Menlo Park dermatologist is urging doctors and parents to try a new cure that he promises is easy and successful. Lice can be cured in 94% of cases by simply soaking the hair and scalp with Cetaphil Gentle Skin Cleanser and then using a hair dryer to dry the cleanser in place, he says.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 29, 2013 | By Anna Gorman, Los Angeles Times
The school health clerk took a comb and pointed to the near-microscopic bugs crawling up and down my daughters' scalps. I cringed. Then she checked my head for the pesky parasites. I held my breath. We had lice. Lots and lots of lice. My youngest daughter scratched her head and started crying. Embarrassed, we headed home. And that began the frustrating, icky, unending, exhausting, humiliating, disgusting battle against the bugs. Parents across the nation are terrified of lice - not because they cause disease, but because even one minuscule egg has the power to keep children out of school and their mothers and fathers out of the office.
NATIONAL
March 29, 2003 | From Times Wire Reports
Using too much Lindane to treat lice infestations can cause deadly brain or nerve damage, federal health officials warned, stressing that the prescription drug should not be used on babies and "with great caution" on children. Once sold in large bottles, Lindane now is to come only in 1- or 2-ounce packets for one-time use, and doctors are told not to prescribe more.
SCIENCE
October 9, 2004 | From Reuters
A study of an ancient human pest -- head lice -- suggests that the ancestors of today's American Indians may have met and fought with pre-humans long extinct elsewhere, scientists said Tuesday. Researchers said one type of lice is found worldwide and must have evolved on the ancestors of our species, Homo sapiens. A second type is found, so far, only in the Americas. That type is thought to have come from Homo erectus in Central Asia.
SCIENCE
April 25, 2009 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
Could lice be the secret to preventing asthma? Research on mice shows that those carrying the most lice had calmer immune systems than uninfested rodents. The finding may have implications for studying the causes of asthma and allergies in people. The study, published in the BioMed Central journal BMC Biology, adds to evidence supporting the so-called hygiene hypothesis, which holds that the rise in asthma and allergies can be linked to hyper-clean living. It was conducted by Joseph Jackson of Britain's University of Nottingham and colleagues, who trapped wild mice and tested the immune systems of those infested or uninfested with the louse Polyplax serrata.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 29, 2013 | By Anna Gorman, Los Angeles Times
The school health clerk took a comb and pointed to the near-microscopic bugs crawling up and down my daughters' scalps. I cringed. Then she checked my head for the pesky parasites. I held my breath. We had lice. Lots and lots of lice. My youngest daughter scratched her head and started crying. Embarrassed, we headed home. And that began the frustrating, icky, unending, exhausting, humiliating, disgusting battle against the bugs. Parents across the nation are terrified of lice - not because they cause disease, but because even one minuscule egg has the power to keep children out of school and their mothers and fathers out of the office.
HOME & GARDEN
April 27, 2013 | By Beth Szymkowski
First time on the market in 24 years. Good bones. Needs TLC. Alas, this was not realty. It was reality, smacking me in the face. Several months after the end of a 20-year marriage to my college sweetheart, I was ready to date. I told my friends. The first call came as I was headed to a movie. "I have somebody for you," she said. "He's tall. " To her, this was a crucial attribute because I'm tall. Unusually tall. When I was confirmed in the sixth grade, I was taller than the bishop - with his hat. Truth be told, I wasn't concerned.
NEWS
November 1, 2012 | By Melissa Healy, Los Angeles Times
A topical formulation of ivermectin, a medication for roundworm, eradicated lice infestations in almost three-quarters of children who coated their dry hair with the lotion once for 10 minutes -- a level of effectiveness that's on a par with new lice treatments that require two applications, a new study has found. The new medication, approved by the FDA earlier this year, appears both to kill lice and to cause their larvae to die as soon as they hatch, and required no "nitpicking" -- the painstaking hunt for eggs left behind.
NEWS
February 8, 2012 | By Eryn Brown, Los Angeles Times / for the Booster Shots blog
These seem to be good times for head lice and the folks who fight them -- where I live, at least.  Just last week, a friend's daughter had to miss a day of school when lice and nits arrived. My friend brought in professionals to give the child a comb-through to clear away the critters, and get her readmitted into school.  A few days later, my own kid's elementary school sent a letter warning parents to be on the lookout (and helpfully offering a referral to a louse-removal service: "We nit-pick so you don't have to. ")
HEALTH
July 16, 2011 | By Daniela Hernandez, Los Angeles Times
Researchers have hit upon a potential new tool to fight the spread of malaria — a drug commonly used to treat head lice and heartworm. The Colorado State University scientists made the discovery while in Senegal during malaria season in August 2008 and August 2009. The drug, ivermectin, has been used in Africa for more than 15 years to treat river blindness, a parasitic disease that often leaves its victims blind and is common in the same regions where malaria is contracted.
SCIENCE
April 10, 2011 | By Amina Khan, Los Angeles Times
The lowly louse may have a more impressive pedigree than once thought: Dinosaurs may have hosted the parasitic bugs, a study says. The findings, published Tuesday in the journal Biology Letters, also show — through comparison of lice — that mammals and birds may have begun to flourish before the dinosaurs went extinct 65 million years ago. That's counter to a long-held idea that they only ascended and diversified once the dinosaurs were gone....
SCIENCE
December 24, 2005 | Thomas H. Maugh II, Times Staff Writer
Louse-borne diseases such as typhus and trench fever devastated Napoleon's army during his ill-fated invasion of Russia in 1812, killing nearly a third of his army, according to a study by French researchers. Napoleon invaded Russia with half a million men that summer but escaped with only a few thousand. Twenty-five thousand French soldiers escaped to Vilnius, Lithuania, during the retreat, but only 3,000 survived to continue the retreat. The rest were buried in mass graves.
NEWS
January 7, 2002 | ALLISON B. COHEN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Eight-year-old Samantha walks begrudgingly through the door. For the next hour or so the Tarzana girl will sit in a tall bamboo chair at Hair Fairies, a salon on trendy 3rd Street in Los Angeles near the Beverly Center. But she's not there for a trim, a tint or even kicky braids. She's there to be nit-picked.
NEWS
January 31, 2011 | By Mary Forgione, Tribune Health
Fewer things provoke more disgust (even though they present no public health threat) than head lice. More and more parents are discovering this tiny beast, which spreads from head-to-head contact, in young children’s hair. Columnist Nicole Brochu of the Sun Sentinel in South Florida can sympathize. Her children have had head lice four times in five years -- enough to make her question the no-nit policy embraced by as many as 82% of schools nationwide. She writes: "Here's the real head-scratcher: Despite the accepted scientific fact that lice are not a health threat, school systems across the country reject the sound advice of the American Academy of Pediatrics by barring any child from attending school if they have even a single nit on their head.
SCIENCE
January 8, 2011 | By Thomas H. Maugh II, Los Angeles Times
Even as long as 170,000 years ago, our ancestors wore lousy clothing. A new analysis of genes from human body lice indicates that modern humans began wearing clothing ? and attracting lice ? as far back as 170,000 years ago. That would be more than 70,000 years before they migrated out of Africa and 800,000 years after they lost most of their body hair. The evidence suggests that the first modern humans spent a considerable amount of time running around Africa naked and hairless, said anthropologist David Reed of the Florida Museum of Natural History in Gainesville, who performed the genetic analysis reported in the January issue of the journal Molecular Biology and Evolution.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|