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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 27, 2014 | By Scott Glover
A Burbank pharmacy that dispensed painkillers and other narcotics to five young patients who later died of overdoses had its license revoked Monday after the state pharmacy board found that its employees failed to properly scrutinize prescriptions that contributed to patient deaths. The pharmacy, Jay Scott Drugs on Glenoaks Boulevard, catered to patients of doctors Bernard Bass and Massoud Bamdad, both of whom were later convicted of crimes in connection with their prescribing. Pharmacists are required by law to scrutinize prescriptions, size up customers and refuse to dispense a drug if they suspect a patient does not have a legitimate medical need for it. Many of Bass' patients were in their 20s and traveled more than 40 miles from their homes in Ventura County to see Bass in North Hollywood, and then another five miles to Jay Scott Drugs where they typically paid cash for a combination of prescription drugs favored by addicts.
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NATIONAL
January 6, 2014 | By Dahleen Glanton and Jason Meisner
CHICAGO - A federal judge Monday stripped away a key element of Chicago's gun ordinance, ruling that it was unconstitutional to prohibit licensed gun stores from operating in the city. U.S. District Judge Edmond Chang said Chicago had failed to persuade him that banning the sale of guns by licensed dealers was necessary to reduce gun violence that has plagued the city. The ruling also would make it legal for individuals to transfer ownership of firearms as gifts or in private sales as long as the recipients were over 18 and had state firearm owner identification cards.
BUSINESS
January 5, 2014 | By Ronald D. White
In its bleakest days in the mid-1990s, Cherokee Inc. realized it had overlooked a key asset - its name. The Cherokee brand, which began as a shoe line in 1973, evolved into a Van Nuys clothing manufacturing company focused on women and juniors sizes. It moved its headquarters two years ago to Sherman Oaks. By the early 1990s, as discount retailers such as Target Corp., Wal-Mart Stores Inc. and Kmart started elbowing out more expensive department stores, Cherokee found itself struggling to maintain sales.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 2, 2014 | By Maura Dolan
SAN FRANCISCO - A Mexican immigrant without a green card on Thursday won the right to practice law in California, an unprecedented ruling that will permit others in similar circumstances to become lawyers. The state Supreme Court agreed unanimously that Sergio C. Garcia - who passed the bar examination four years ago - should receive a law license while awaiting federal approval of his green card application. The court, which has the final word on licensing lawyers, said it was able to approve Garcia's admission to the State Bar because the Legislature had passed a law last year that cleared the way. "The fact that an undocumented immigrant's presence in this country violates federal statutes is not itself a sufficient or persuasive basis for denying undocumented immigrants, as a class, admission to the State Bar," Chief Justice Tani Cantil-Sakauye wrote for the court.
NATIONAL
December 27, 2013 | By Saba Hamedy, This post has been updated.
The cannabis market in Colorado continues to reach new highs as several store owners in Denver picked up their retail marijuana licenses  Friday. The store owners began lining up outside the Mile High City's Department of Excise and Licenses before the doors opened at 8 a.m., Amber Miller, a city spokeswoman, said in an email to the Los Angeles Times. Denver is among the 26 Colorado municipalities and counties that will allow medical marijuana businesses to begin transitioning into retail marijuana businesses on Jan. 1. Amendment 64 , which voters approved last year, legalized recreational pot use in the state for people over 21. However, retail sales of the drug are not permitted until the new year.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 4, 2013 | By Catherine Saillant
Calling it a potential health risk and a gateway to tobacco use, the Los Angeles City Council on Wednesday voted unanimously to regulate the sales of e-cigarettes and other "vaping" devices. The new law puts electronic smoking devices in the same category as tobacco products, subjecting their sales to the same restrictions. It bans sales from street kiosks, ice cream trucks and self-service displays, and requires retailers to obtain a license before selling the products. Parallel legislation under city consideration would ban the use of e-cigarettes in the same places that tobacco is prohibited, including restaurants and parks.
BUSINESS
December 1, 2013 | By Marc Lifsher
SACRAMENTO - A former head of Caltrans wants to save drivers more than the average of $600 a year he says they now spend fixing flat tires, aligning wheels and repairing other damage caused by potholes and bad pavement. Will Kempton, who ran the state Department of Transportation from 2004 to 2009, has submitted a proposed voter initiative for the 2014 ballot that would raise money to rebuild roads and bridges and boost mass transit. If it qualifies for the ballot and is approved by voters, such an initiative would more than double the state vehicle license fee - known as the car tax - to 1.65% from 0.65% of the value of an auto or truck.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 19, 2013 | By Howard Blume and Stephen Ceasar
Contradicting earlier claims, Los Angeles school district officials said Tuesday that their right to use English and math curriculum installed on district iPads expires after three years. At market rates, buying a new license for the curriculum would cost $50 to $100 each year per iPad, an additional cost that could surpass $60 million annually. The expense would add to the price tag of the $1-billion effort to provide a tablet to every teacher and student in the nation's second-largest school system.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 13, 2013 | By Samantha Schaefer
Down a narrow dirt road in the Sierra Nevada lies a once-bustling gold mining ghost town - “the real McCoy” - complete with a gin mill and memories of an opium den. And for $225,000, the Northern California town of Seneca could be yours, according to an ad posted on Craigslist . Liquor license and all, the sleepy Plumas County town is for sale by its private owners, who are selling due to health issues, the ad states. The remote property includes the bar, three run-down cabins and 9.8 acres through which the Feather River runs, the ad says.
NATIONAL
November 8, 2013 | By Soumya Karlamangla
A New Hampshire man fought in the state's top court Thursday for the right to get a vanity license plate reading  “COPSLIE," prompting a debate about free speech.  The former David Montenegro -- who has officially changed his name to “human,” as he was called in court -- had tried to buy the plate multiple times in 2010 but was rejected by the New Hampshire Department of Motor Vehicles. He sued, lost and appealed to the New Hampshire Supreme Court. The state's regulations say a vanity plate must “not be capable of an obscene interpretation” and “not be ethnically, racially, or which a reasonable person would find offensive to good taste.” The plaintiff, joined by the New Hampshire Civil Liberties Union, argued that “good taste” is too subjective, and therefore allows discriminatory practices in issuing license places.  Anthony Galdieri, an attorney representing the civil liberties union, argued that ambiguity in the regulation allows for arbitrary denials.
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