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NEWS
August 13, 2013 | By Jeff Spurrier
Unlike many plants considered invasive, fennel does everything it can to ingratiate itself into the garden. Its leaves are attractive -- feathery and delicate -- and the umbrella-shaped blooms of bright yellow flowers that come in summer serve as miniature landing pads for pollinators. Every part of fennel, root to leaf to pollen to fruit, is infused with the varying levels of its iconic licorice flavor. Unlike other aromatic crops -- dill, cumin, anise, caraway -- only fennel ( Foeniculum vulgare )
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NEWS
August 13, 2013 | By Jeff Spurrier
Unlike many plants considered invasive, fennel does everything it can to ingratiate itself into the garden. Its leaves are attractive -- feathery and delicate -- and the umbrella-shaped blooms of bright yellow flowers that come in summer serve as miniature landing pads for pollinators. Every part of fennel, root to leaf to pollen to fruit, is infused with the varying levels of its iconic licorice flavor. Unlike other aromatic crops -- dill, cumin, anise, caraway -- only fennel ( Foeniculum vulgare )
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BUSINESS
August 23, 2012 | By David Lazarus
Here is today's Consumer Confidential segment from KTLA. We talked about the latest findings from the Pew Research Center showing a shrinking of the middle class. Also on the agenda: A big fine for marketers of a TV exercise device, and a recall of Red Vines licorice.  
HEALTH
October 27, 2012 | By Emily Sohn
After years of telling us to eat our fruits and vegetables, companies are increasingly suggesting that we also put produce on our faces. From apple eye cream to raspberry serum, skin-care products contain whole-food ingredients - along with claims that they reduce puffiness, erase redness or smooth wrinkles. In theory, adding plant ingredients to creams and moisturizers makes sense, experts say. Fruits and vegetables are full of antioxidant compounds that afford them natural protection from sun, pollution, smoking, insects and other damage - and if they work for plants, why not for us?
NEWS
May 7, 1989 | Roger Simon
Simon says: --Carving a turkey is like parallel parking: You can do it perfectly until you have to do it in front of someone. --Are there really people who can still remember their high-school locker combination? (I couldn't remember it when I was in high school.) --When's the last time you heard a really good harpist? --I am always dismayed when I check into hotels and find cigarette burns on the bathroom sink. Who is so depraved that he needs to smoke in the john?
BUSINESS
April 23, 1986 | DENISE GELLENE, Times Staff Writer
Licorice Pizza, a Southern California record and video store chain that got its name from a 1960s record album, is being sold to the Musicland Group, the nation's largest specialty retailer of records and tapes. Musicland, a unit of American Can, said Tuesday that it agreed to buy the Licorice Pizza outlets and 26 other record stores for $13 million. The purchase of the 34 Licorice Pizza stores gives American Can's Musicland Group an entre into the lucrative Southland home video rental market.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 17, 1990 | From Associated Press
The actress who portrayed housekeeper Aunt Bee on "The Andy Griffith Show" lived her last years in seclusion in a dark, dingy house and kept a 1966 green Studebaker with four flat tires in the garage. The home of Frances Bavier reflects little of the coziness of the fictional house that Aunt Bee managed for Mayberry's sheriff and his young son on the popular television series of the 1960s. The 86-year-old Miss Bavier died Dec.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 4, 1988
People who chew tobacco may be elevating their blood pressure, according to Dr. Neil Shulman, an associate professor of medicine at Emory University. Shulman said the problem appears to be licorice, used in many popular brands of chewing tobacco to enhance the flavor. Chewing tobacco already has been linked to an increase in oral cancers.
FOOD
February 28, 1991 | KATHIE JENKINS
Chateau D'Lanz 18930 59th Ave. N.E. Arlington, Wash. 98223 (800) 722-0068 Check, money order or major credit cards. The Indian god Brahma called licorice the elixir of life. In ancient China, licorice was used in religious ceremonies. King Tut liked licorice, too; when his tomb was opened, licorice root was found along with golden treasure. But it took an Englishman, George Dunhill, to turn licorice into candy.
TRAVEL
July 15, 1990 | JENNIFER MERIN
Inside Jacob Hooy & Co.'s cozy little shop at Kloveniersburgwal 10-12, the warm air is scented with a rich, pleasing bouquet of dried herbs, spices and roots. Among these smells that sooth and stimulate the spirit, the strongest and most easily recognized is licorice. An ancient medicine, licorice is contemporary Holland's favorite candy. Dutch people buy more licorice each year than they do tooth paste . . . averaging about four pounds per person, according to Holland Supermarket magazine.
BUSINESS
August 23, 2012 | By David Lazarus
Here is today's Consumer Confidential segment from KTLA. We talked about the latest findings from the Pew Research Center showing a shrinking of the middle class. Also on the agenda: A big fine for marketers of a TV exercise device, and a recall of Red Vines licorice.  
BUSINESS
August 23, 2012 | By Tiffany Hsu
The California maker of Red Vines issued a voluntary recall of its Black Licorice Twists this week after the state's Department of Public Health warned of high levels of lead - more than double the amount deemed healthy for children. The agency said 16-ounce bags of the candy, with the label “Best Before 020413,” were affected. Testing found that the packages, produced by Union City-based American Licorice Co., contained as much as 0.33 parts per million of lead, or 13.2 micrograms per serving.
NEWS
September 17, 2002 | JIM PATTERSON, ASSOCIATED PRESS
It happens every time Jeff Green and his wife go out to listen to music. They hear an unfamiliar song, exchange a look, then pull out notepads and pens. "Some people collect cuckoo clocks," Green said. "Some people collect movie posters. We collect songs, and then classify them." Green and Lauren Virshup publish "The Green Book of Songs by Subject." It's a more than 1,500-page monument to obsession that's as fun for music fans to breeze through as it must have been tedious to produce.
HEALTH
February 15, 1999 | JOE GRAEDON and TERESA GRAEDON, Joe Graedon is a pharmacologist. Teresa Graedon holds a doctorate in medical anthropology and is a nutrition expert. In this special People's Pharmacy column, which runs the third Monday fo every month, the Graedons answer letters from readers of the Los Angeles Times only
Question: I read in your column about the dangers of eating black licorice. It stopped me in my tracks, because for the last two weeks I've been eating natural black licorice from Finland every day. What are the dangers? I'm a 35-year-old woman, healthy weight, who works out regularly and is active in sports. I have allergies and asthma, but those are the only serious medical problems. I'm dying of curiosity. Who would think that a natural candy could be detrimental to my health?
HEALTH
December 14, 1998 | JOE GRAEDON and TERESA GRAEDON
Question: A friend gave my husband some cough lozenges with menthol and natural licorice. He sucks some every day and I am concerned. He takes hydrochlorothiazide and propranolol for high blood pressure. Could the cough drops interact with his medicine? Answer: We are licorice lovers ourselves, but we must urge caution. There is an ingredient in natural black licorice that may be helpful in treating digestive distress or coughs. It can cause problems, however.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 20, 1995 | Steve Hochman
So you finally admitted that CDs are here to stay and sold your old turntable at your yard sale. Bad timing. Vinyl albums are coming back (kinda) and they may be better than ever. MCA Records is launching a series of audiophile-quality albums, with all the things vinyl junkies say they miss in CDs, primarily a supposedly warmer sound and the tactile satisfaction of the big cover and disc.
HEALTH
December 14, 1998 | JOE GRAEDON and TERESA GRAEDON
Question: A friend gave my husband some cough lozenges with menthol and natural licorice. He sucks some every day and I am concerned. He takes hydrochlorothiazide and propranolol for high blood pressure. Could the cough drops interact with his medicine? Answer: We are licorice lovers ourselves, but we must urge caution. There is an ingredient in natural black licorice that may be helpful in treating digestive distress or coughs. It can cause problems, however.
NEWS
September 17, 2002 | JIM PATTERSON, ASSOCIATED PRESS
It happens every time Jeff Green and his wife go out to listen to music. They hear an unfamiliar song, exchange a look, then pull out notepads and pens. "Some people collect cuckoo clocks," Green said. "Some people collect movie posters. We collect songs, and then classify them." Green and Lauren Virshup publish "The Green Book of Songs by Subject." It's a more than 1,500-page monument to obsession that's as fun for music fans to breeze through as it must have been tedious to produce.
FOOD
February 28, 1991 | KATHIE JENKINS
Chateau D'Lanz 18930 59th Ave. N.E. Arlington, Wash. 98223 (800) 722-0068 Check, money order or major credit cards. The Indian god Brahma called licorice the elixir of life. In ancient China, licorice was used in religious ceremonies. King Tut liked licorice, too; when his tomb was opened, licorice root was found along with golden treasure. But it took an Englishman, George Dunhill, to turn licorice into candy.
TRAVEL
July 15, 1990 | JENNIFER MERIN
Inside Jacob Hooy & Co.'s cozy little shop at Kloveniersburgwal 10-12, the warm air is scented with a rich, pleasing bouquet of dried herbs, spices and roots. Among these smells that sooth and stimulate the spirit, the strongest and most easily recognized is licorice. An ancient medicine, licorice is contemporary Holland's favorite candy. Dutch people buy more licorice each year than they do tooth paste . . . averaging about four pounds per person, according to Holland Supermarket magazine.
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