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Liechtenstein

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NEWS
March 21, 1989 | From Associated Press
Voters have cleared the way for this tiny principality to seek membership in the United Nations. Residents voted 4,787 to 3,644 on Sunday against a proposed constitutional amendment that would have required a vote of the people before Liechtenstein could join an international body. The nation's regent, Prince Hans Adam, has been the leading advocate of a U.N. role for the principality of 26,000 people.
ARTICLES BY DATE
SPORTS
February 4, 2013 | By Kevin Baxter
A global investigation into suspected fixing of soccer matches has uncovered more than 680 suspicious games, including World Cup and European Championships qualifiers. The probe, conducted by Europol, the European Union's joint police body, raised questions about 380 matches in Europe and 300 elsewhere, primarily in Africa, Asia and Latin America. The agency said the evidence pointed to the involvement of a Singapore-based crime gang that has long been suspected of fixing matches.
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BUSINESS
February 27, 2008 | Christian Retzlaff and Kim Murphy, Special to The Times
Investigators have traced more than $296 million in German assets to secretive foundations in Liechtenstein in a widening, worldwide tax-evasion investigation in which 163 Germans have admitted guilt, prosecutors said Tuesday. Separately, the U.S. Internal Revenue Service announced that it was initiating enforcement action against 100 American taxpayers in connection with Liechtenstein accounts.
NEWS
October 31, 2009
Chris Erskine: The name of the country Liechtenstein was misspelled as Lichtenstein in Chris Erskine's column in Thursday's Sports section.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 27, 1985 | From Associated Press
"Liechtenstein: The Princely Collections," an exhibition of paintings, sculptures, other works of art and firearms from the collections of the reigning prince of Liechtenstein, is on view at the Metropolitan Museum of Art through May 1.
NEWS
March 13, 2008
Philanthropist: The Column One article in Saturday's Section A about philanthropist Chuck Feeney misspelled Liechtenstein as Lichtenstein.
WORLD
November 28, 2005 | From Times Wire Reports
Voters in the tiny Alpine principality of Liechtenstein overwhelmingly endorsed a law authorizing abortion during the first 12 weeks of pregnancy. Antiabortion advocates, led by the Roman Catholic archbishop, had proposed a different text to prohibit abortion under any circumstances. It was rejected by 81% of voters. Liechtenstein is now in agreement with the rest of Western Europe -- except for Ireland -- in legalizing abortion early in pregnancy.
NEWS
October 18, 1992 | Reuters
Switzerland has apologized for sending troops into its unarmed neighbor Liechtenstein by mistake, officials in the tiny principality said. Swiss recruits on maneuvers set up an observation post in Triesenberg on Tuesday, overlooking the fact that the town is not located on Swiss territory, the officials said late Friday. The soldiers asked a local resident if they could use her garage to set up their post, they said.
TRAVEL
June 7, 1987 | NINO LO BELLO, An American author of five books, Lo Bello has been a foreign correspondent in Europe for 25 years. and
The sovereign shrimp . . . the little giant of Europe . . . the wee Titan . . . the postage-stamp state . . . the mouse that roars. Call Liechtenstein whatever you will, but after all the witty quips and ding-dong designations, pick up your valise, put a red circle on your map where the little Big L is, and help yourself to a country the size of a jellybean. Liechtenstein is a conversation piece.
WORLD
August 16, 2003 | From Times Wire Reports
The outspoken prince of Liechtenstein, who attracted controversy in Europe with a push for more power, announced that he would step down and hand the reins to his son. Prince Hans Adam II made the announcement during a party at his castle to mark the national day. Hans Adam, 58, said the hand-over to his son, Prince Alois, 35, would take place on the 2004 national day.
TRAVEL
September 28, 2008 | Susan Spano, Times Staff Writer
If you can identify the five smallest countries in Continental Europe you get a gold star. If you know where they are on the map, you should be on "Jeopardy." And if you have visited them you don't get anything else; you have already been rewarded. The tiniest, Vatican City, is undeniably the most influential. The next smallest, Monaco, gets very noisy in May. The third most diminutive, San Marino, was the hilltop hide-out of an escaped slave.
BUSINESS
February 27, 2008 | Christian Retzlaff and Kim Murphy, Special to The Times
Investigators have traced more than $296 million in German assets to secretive foundations in Liechtenstein in a widening, worldwide tax-evasion investigation in which 163 Germans have admitted guilt, prosecutors said Tuesday. Separately, the U.S. Internal Revenue Service announced that it was initiating enforcement action against 100 American taxpayers in connection with Liechtenstein accounts.
WORLD
November 28, 2005 | From Times Wire Reports
Voters in the tiny Alpine principality of Liechtenstein overwhelmingly endorsed a law authorizing abortion during the first 12 weeks of pregnancy. Antiabortion advocates, led by the Roman Catholic archbishop, had proposed a different text to prohibit abortion under any circumstances. It was rejected by 81% of voters. Liechtenstein is now in agreement with the rest of Western Europe -- except for Ireland -- in legalizing abortion early in pregnancy.
WORLD
August 15, 2004 | From Times Wire Reports
Prince Hans Adam II of Liechtenstein plans to hand over many of his vast powers to his son today at a garden party for his subjects -- all 33,000 of them. Only 17 months ago, the prince won the power to dismiss governments, veto laws and cast the deciding vote in appointing judges. Soon after, he announced that he would hand power to his son Alois, 36. Hans Adam, however, says he will remain head of state, his son will only be his "representative," and the two will talk regularly.
WORLD
August 16, 2003 | From Times Wire Reports
The outspoken prince of Liechtenstein, who attracted controversy in Europe with a push for more power, announced that he would step down and hand the reins to his son. Prince Hans Adam II made the announcement during a party at his castle to mark the national day. Hans Adam, 58, said the hand-over to his son, Prince Alois, 35, would take place on the 2004 national day.
WORLD
March 17, 2003 | From Times Wire Reports
Liechtenstein's ruling prince dropped his threat to leave the nation after voters overwhelming approved a measure to overhaul the constitution to in effect give him more powers than any other European monarch. About 64% of the electorate voted for Prince Hans Adam II's proposed constitution, giving him the right to dismiss governments, approve judicial nominees and veto laws.
WORLD
August 15, 2004 | From Times Wire Reports
Prince Hans Adam II of Liechtenstein plans to hand over many of his vast powers to his son today at a garden party for his subjects -- all 33,000 of them. Only 17 months ago, the prince won the power to dismiss governments, veto laws and cast the deciding vote in appointing judges. Soon after, he announced that he would hand power to his son Alois, 36. Hans Adam, however, says he will remain head of state, his son will only be his "representative," and the two will talk regularly.
NEWS
August 22, 2000 | VIRGINIA ELLIS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After searching 10 years for the missing loot of a Medi-Cal fraud ring, state investigators have recovered $9.4 million from hidden bank accounts in the European principality of Liechtenstein. The illegal haul is being returned to California just as the leader of the ring, Marcus Fontaine, is finishing a 10-year federal prison term for mail fraud and money laundering convictions. Authorities suspect Fontaine planned to retrieve the stash after his release.
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