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WORLD
May 10, 2004 | From Times Wire Reports
Taiwan began recounting 13 million ballots from its March presidential election to end political feuding and suspicions of fraud that threaten the credibility of the reelected president. President Chen Shui-bian was reelected by just one-fifth of a percentage point, or about 30,000 votes, in balloting that opposition candidate Lien Chan alleged was marred by irregularities.
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WORLD
April 30, 2005 | Ching-Ching Ni, Times Staff Writer
Taiwan's opposition leader shook hands with Chinese President Hu Jintao in a landmark meeting in the Great Hall of the People on Friday, symbolically ending a standoff between their political parties that had existed for nearly six decades.
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WORLD
December 31, 2004 | From Times Wire Reports
Taiwan's High Court rejected an opposition petition to declare the March 20 presidential election invalid because of alleged voting irregularities and a mysterious shooting that slightly injured the president a day before the vote. Presiding Judge Cheng Ya-ping said the opposition's demand was rejected because no systematic fraud was found. President Chen Shui-bian narrowly won, but his opponent -- Nationalist Party leader Lien Chan -- has refused to accept the result. A recount cut Chen's lead to 25,000 from 30,000 of 13 million ballots cast.
WORLD
December 31, 2004 | From Times Wire Reports
Taiwan's High Court rejected an opposition petition to declare the March 20 presidential election invalid because of alleged voting irregularities and a mysterious shooting that slightly injured the president a day before the vote. Presiding Judge Cheng Ya-ping said the opposition's demand was rejected because no systematic fraud was found. President Chen Shui-bian narrowly won, but his opponent -- Nationalist Party leader Lien Chan -- has refused to accept the result. A recount cut Chen's lead to 25,000 from 30,000 of 13 million ballots cast.
NEWS
March 15, 2000 | From Associated Press
Taiwan's most famous first lady endorsed the ruling Nationalist Party's presidential candidate Tuesday, urging the party to mend a split within its ranks and save the island from disaster. The 102-year-old widow of Gen. Chiang Kai-shek made her appeal in a letter from her home in New York, where she has spent most of her time since her husband died in 1975.
NEWS
February 13, 1993 | DAVID HOLLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A leader with Taiwanese roots has been nominated to be Taiwan's next prime minister, a move that further undermines China's hope of regaining control of the island, which it views as a breakaway province. Mainland-born politicians who fled China in 1949 held an iron grip over Taiwan's political life for nearly four decades. But they will be left with only marginal influence if, as expected, Gov. Lien Chan wins legislative approval later this month as Taiwan's prime minister.
WORLD
February 8, 2004 | Mark Magnier and Tyler Marshall, Times Staff Writers
President Chen Shui-bian is taking Taiwan down a dangerous and irresponsible path in his bid for reelection, opposition candidate Lien Chan said in an interview. "He's trying to do something to antagonize the mainland," Lien said Thursday, referring to Chen's decision to call a referendum on China's missile program. "If that brings a furious reaction, intimidation, even a missile crisis, all this will serve his purpose" of diverting attention from Taiwan's economic and social problems, he said.
WORLD
April 30, 2005 | Ching-Ching Ni, Times Staff Writer
Taiwan's opposition leader shook hands with Chinese President Hu Jintao in a landmark meeting in the Great Hall of the People on Friday, symbolically ending a standoff between their political parties that had existed for nearly six decades.
NEWS
January 10, 1997 | From Times Wire Reports
In a move that could upset Communist China, the Vatican said that Pope John Paul II will meet Taiwan's vice president on Tuesday. Lien Chan will be the highest-ranking Taiwanese official to visit the Vatican and meet the pope, according to Raymond Tai, Taiwan's ambassador to the Vatican. The Vatican said Lien had asked for the audience. The Vatican is one of only 30 states to formally recognize Taiwan.
NEWS
August 22, 1997 | From Times Wire Reports
President Lee Teng-hui named a new premier who vowed to improve Taiwan's icy relations with China and maintain its status as an Asian economic tiger. Vincent Siew, a ruling party legislator, will replace Premier Lien Chan. Siew was once the island's top policymaker on China. Lee named Siew after Lien tendered his resignation and that of his Cabinet to prepare for a reshuffle.
WORLD
May 10, 2004 | From Times Wire Reports
Taiwan began recounting 13 million ballots from its March presidential election to end political feuding and suspicions of fraud that threaten the credibility of the reelected president. President Chen Shui-bian was reelected by just one-fifth of a percentage point, or about 30,000 votes, in balloting that opposition candidate Lien Chan alleged was marred by irregularities.
WORLD
February 8, 2004 | Mark Magnier and Tyler Marshall, Times Staff Writers
President Chen Shui-bian is taking Taiwan down a dangerous and irresponsible path in his bid for reelection, opposition candidate Lien Chan said in an interview. "He's trying to do something to antagonize the mainland," Lien said Thursday, referring to Chen's decision to call a referendum on China's missile program. "If that brings a furious reaction, intimidation, even a missile crisis, all this will serve his purpose" of diverting attention from Taiwan's economic and social problems, he said.
NEWS
March 15, 2000 | From Associated Press
Taiwan's most famous first lady endorsed the ruling Nationalist Party's presidential candidate Tuesday, urging the party to mend a split within its ranks and save the island from disaster. The 102-year-old widow of Gen. Chiang Kai-shek made her appeal in a letter from her home in New York, where she has spent most of her time since her husband died in 1975.
NEWS
February 13, 1993 | DAVID HOLLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A leader with Taiwanese roots has been nominated to be Taiwan's next prime minister, a move that further undermines China's hope of regaining control of the island, which it views as a breakaway province. Mainland-born politicians who fled China in 1949 held an iron grip over Taiwan's political life for nearly four decades. But they will be left with only marginal influence if, as expected, Gov. Lien Chan wins legislative approval later this month as Taiwan's prime minister.
WORLD
July 17, 2005 | From Times Wire Reports
Taiwan's largest opposition party chose as its new chairman an uncompromising advocate of eventual unification with China, laying down the gauntlet to the island's independence-leaning leaders. In their first public leadership ballot, the once-dominant Nationalists selected Taipei Mayor Ma Ying-jeou, 55, to take over from Lien Chan. About 45% of the party's million members turned out for the ballot, and Ma garnered more than twice as many votes as his lone rival, Wang Jyn-pyng, 64.
WORLD
March 14, 2004 | From Times Wire Reports
An estimated 2 million people marched, blowing whistles and air horns, in an island-wide protest against President Chen Shui-bian a week before Taiwan's presidential election. One massive crowd yelled, "Replace the president, save Taiwan!" as people blocked streets outside the presidential office in the capital, Taipei. The event was organized by opposition candidate Lien Chan, who stood on a stage in front of the building, cheering on the protesters as he accused Chen of incompetence.
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