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Liev Schreiber

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ENTERTAINMENT
May 8, 2013 | By Steven Zeitchik
The new trailer for Lee Daniels' “The Butler” shows an up-from-his-bootstraps man moving, Zelig-like, through U.S. presidential history, demonstrating how “one man overcame his past.” But for at least one of the actors working on it, the fact-based film offered something else: a history lesson. Liev Schreiber, who can be spotted in the trailer (in surprising old-man makeup) as Lyndon B. Johnson, said he found himself thus enlightened. VIDEO: Upcoming summer films “Before I did this movie I wasn't really aware of the extent to which LBJ had moved forward the Civil Rights movement on Kennedy's behalf,” the actor told The Times.
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ENTERTAINMENT
July 1, 2013 | By Scott Collins
Showtime needed a little help with its ratings records books, and "Ray Donovan" was happy to oblige. The crime drama starring Liev Schreiber as a "fixer" to the rich and famous opened Sunday with the premium cable network's best-ever ratings for an original series premiere. In its first showing at 10 p.m., "Ray Donovan" drew 1.4 million total viewers, according to Nielsen. That was better than the 1.1 million in 2011 for the premiere of "Homeland" - which at the time was considered a breakthrough for Showtime.
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 4, 2007 | Jon Caramanica, Times Staff Writer
MICHAEL Keppler emerges, of course, from shadows and fog. The temp fill-in for Gil Grissom (William Petersen) in the Las Vegas crime lab on "CSI," Keppler is played by Liev Schreiber, who has mottled skin, speaks terse dialogue and is possessed with a rough, uncomplicated voice -- all of which play well on the small screen. He sometimes recalls a character in a David Mamet play -- not surprising, given that Schreiber won a 2005 Tony for his turn in "Glengarry Glen Ross."
ENTERTAINMENT
June 29, 2013 | By Robert Lloyd, Television Critic
"Ray Donovan," a new drama premiering Sunday on Showtime, takes the unlikely tack of overlaying a "Boston-Irish dysfunctional family with criminal elements" story - you know the type - onto a backdrop of big-shot Hollywood. And gets away with it. Created by Ann Biderman ("Southland"), it is on paper not a show I'd expect to like. I grow weary of antiheroes. I tire of the way that TV and movies picture Hollywood just to kick it around. Notwithstanding the creeps and hacks that doubtless can be found in its corner offices and power corridors, it's also a place where a lot gets done by people committed to good work, who go home to more or less (factoring out the money, privilege and hired help)
ENTERTAINMENT
January 1, 2009 | Tom Roston
On a recent chilly morning, Liev Schreiber was eating breakfast in a downtown Manhattan restaurant while a swarm of shutterbugs hovered outside on the corner near his apartment. However, Schreiber wasn't exactly the one whom the photographers were after. "It's her," he said, with a weary grin. He's referring to his partner, Oscar-nominated actress Naomi Watts, with whom he has one son, and at this point, another on the way (Watts gave birth to their second son two weeks after this interview).
ENTERTAINMENT
May 6, 2007 | By Neil LaBute, Special to The Times
There's a wonderful old theater story about Laurence Olivier in the 1960s — he was playing in "Othello" and receiving generally glowing notices opposite Frank Findlay and a young actress by the name of Maggie Smith. One night, however, as he stormed through the jealous general's odyssey, Olivier seemed to be on fire (not literally, of course, because that would be painful, and, while certainly an interesting if too literal take on the Moor's passionate histrionics, pretty "out there" as an interpretation of Shakespeare, even for the '60s)
ENTERTAINMENT
July 1, 2013 | By Scott Collins
Showtime needed a little help with its ratings records books, and "Ray Donovan" was happy to oblige. The crime drama starring Liev Schreiber as a "fixer" to the rich and famous opened Sunday with the premium cable network's best-ever ratings for an original series premiere. In its first showing at 10 p.m., "Ray Donovan" drew 1.4 million total viewers, according to Nielsen. That was better than the 1.1 million in 2011 for the premiere of "Homeland" - which at the time was considered a breakthrough for Showtime.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 29, 2013 | By Robert Lloyd, Television Critic
"Ray Donovan," a new drama premiering Sunday on Showtime, takes the unlikely tack of overlaying a "Boston-Irish dysfunctional family with criminal elements" story - you know the type - onto a backdrop of big-shot Hollywood. And gets away with it. Created by Ann Biderman ("Southland"), it is on paper not a show I'd expect to like. I grow weary of antiheroes. I tire of the way that TV and movies picture Hollywood just to kick it around. Notwithstanding the creeps and hacks that doubtless can be found in its corner offices and power corridors, it's also a place where a lot gets done by people committed to good work, who go home to more or less (factoring out the money, privilege and hired help)
ENTERTAINMENT
August 8, 2004 | Susan King
As the pivotal character in Jonathan Demme's well-received remake of John Frankenheimer's 1962 classic, "The Manchurian Candidate," Liev Schreiber adds one more complex role to a wide-ranging resume. Schreiber, 36, plays Raymond Shaw -- the role essayed by Laurence Harvey in the original -- now a repressed, decorated Persian Gulf War hero who finds himself running for vice president thanks to the machinations of his senator mother (Meryl Streep). Unknown to him, his mother has conspired with executives of a major global corporation to make him president.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 9, 1999 | MARSHALL FINE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Every so often, Hollywood spins out the kind of dueling duals that seem like more than coincidence: twin asteroid movies one year, a pair of Wyatt Earp pictures another, a matched set of Christopher Columbus films before that.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 8, 2013 | By Steven Zeitchik
The new trailer for Lee Daniels' “The Butler” shows an up-from-his-bootstraps man moving, Zelig-like, through U.S. presidential history, demonstrating how “one man overcame his past.” But for at least one of the actors working on it, the fact-based film offered something else: a history lesson. Liev Schreiber, who can be spotted in the trailer (in surprising old-man makeup) as Lyndon B. Johnson, said he found himself thus enlightened. VIDEO: Upcoming summer films “Before I did this movie I wasn't really aware of the extent to which LBJ had moved forward the Civil Rights movement on Kennedy's behalf,” the actor told The Times.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 13, 2010 | By Charles McNulty, Los Angeles Times Theater Critic
The recent parade of Hollywood stars on Broadway has allowed theater critics to indulge in their two favorite pastimes — grousing and fawning. The hypocrisy is perfectly natural: Standards need to be upheld while luminaries are there to be adored. Yet pity the poor conflicted reviewer — committed to "The Theatuh" on the one hand, swept up in the tidal surge of celebrity charisma on the other. I've always maintained that a good actor is a good actor. But famous novices and returning legends need to choose their theatrical ventures wisely.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 27, 2009 | By Allan M. Jalon
Scarlett Johansson is set to step before a Broadway audience for the first time Monday night in Arthur Miller's waterfront tragedy, "A View From the Bridge," in the role of the 17-year-old niece of a tough New York longshoreman whose feelings for her carry him and his family to a shattering end. Johansson's debut in Monday's preview is getting more attention than a notable reappearance, the return of Gregory Mosher, who last directed a Broadway show...
ENTERTAINMENT
January 1, 2009 | Tom Roston
On a recent chilly morning, Liev Schreiber was eating breakfast in a downtown Manhattan restaurant while a swarm of shutterbugs hovered outside on the corner near his apartment. However, Schreiber wasn't exactly the one whom the photographers were after. "It's her," he said, with a weary grin. He's referring to his partner, Oscar-nominated actress Naomi Watts, with whom he has one son, and at this point, another on the way (Watts gave birth to their second son two weeks after this interview).
ENTERTAINMENT
May 6, 2007 | By Neil LaBute, Special to The Times
There's a wonderful old theater story about Laurence Olivier in the 1960s — he was playing in "Othello" and receiving generally glowing notices opposite Frank Findlay and a young actress by the name of Maggie Smith. One night, however, as he stormed through the jealous general's odyssey, Olivier seemed to be on fire (not literally, of course, because that would be painful, and, while certainly an interesting if too literal take on the Moor's passionate histrionics, pretty "out there" as an interpretation of Shakespeare, even for the '60s)
ENTERTAINMENT
February 4, 2007 | Jon Caramanica, Times Staff Writer
MICHAEL Keppler emerges, of course, from shadows and fog. The temp fill-in for Gil Grissom (William Petersen) in the Las Vegas crime lab on "CSI," Keppler is played by Liev Schreiber, who has mottled skin, speaks terse dialogue and is possessed with a rough, uncomplicated voice -- all of which play well on the small screen. He sometimes recalls a character in a David Mamet play -- not surprising, given that Schreiber won a 2005 Tony for his turn in "Glengarry Glen Ross."
ENTERTAINMENT
December 29, 2000 | KEVIN THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Tom Gilroy's debut feature, "Spring Forward," is so fully realized and so moving that you wish you could get away with merely saying: "Go see it for yourself." Every frame attests to the power of simplicity. It affords Ned Beatty the role of a lifetime and an equally fine part for Liev Schreiber, who is swiftly emerging as one of the most accomplished actors of his generation.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 9, 2005 | Susan Carpenter, Times Staff Writer
IF Eastern Europe made a musical crash landing in the U.S., it would sound like Gogol Bordello -- a bawdy pack of immigrants dancing their way through the streets late at night, instruments blaring. The New York City eight-piece is the American melting pot as music: a multicultural riot of violin, accordion, ska, flamenco and rock, or, as the band says more succinctly, "Gypsy punk."
ENTERTAINMENT
October 9, 2005 | Susan Carpenter, Times Staff Writer
IF Eastern Europe made a musical crash landing in the U.S., it would sound like Gogol Bordello -- a bawdy pack of immigrants dancing their way through the streets late at night, instruments blaring. The New York City eight-piece is the American melting pot as music: a multicultural riot of violin, accordion, ska, flamenco and rock, or, as the band says more succinctly, "Gypsy punk."
ENTERTAINMENT
January 16, 2005 | Kristin Hohenadel, Special to The Times
Like many young Americans, Jonathan Safran Foer came to this post-revolution, fairy tale city in the 1990s, joining the crush of literary pretenders in search of a modern-day Hemingway's Paris and Czech Americans in search of their roots. Foer stayed for a few months in 1997, a period that included a badly planned, hapless three-day trip to Ukraine for clues to his Jewish ancestry. But what had been a failure of experience became a gold mine for his imagination.
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