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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 22, 2013 | By Andrew Blankstein and Matt Stevens
Scott Sterling, the 32-year-old son of Los Angeles Clippers owner Donald Sterling, died as a result of a pulmonary embolism and  "narcotic medication intake" in what Los Angeles County coroner's officials classified as an accidental death, authorities said Monday. Sterling was found dead in his apartment on Pacific Coast Highway in Malibu on New Year's night. Los Angeles County Sheriff's Department officials quickly determined his death did not involve foul play but appeared to involve some type of drug overdose.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
April 27, 2014 | By Patt Morrison
Nowadays, it's the price tag that makes a house famous. The most expensive U.S. home ever sold, a single-family Connecticut house bought by a company, recently went for $120 million. It used to be the owners who made the house famous. Which made Beverly Hills' Pickfair, after the White House, perhaps the most famous house in the country as the home of moviedom's Mary Pickford and Douglas Fairbanks. The next owner of Pickfair rose in the pantheon as well: Jerry Buss, who made the L.A. Lakers one of the winningest franchises in NBA history.
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OPINION
April 7, 2013 | Susan Silk and Barry Goldman
When Susan had breast cancer, we heard a lot of lame remarks, but our favorite came from one of Susan's colleagues. She wanted, she needed, to visit Susan after the surgery, but Susan didn't feel like having visitors, and she said so. Her colleague's response? "This isn't just about you. " "It's not?" Susan wondered. "My breast cancer is not about me? It's about you?" The same theme came up again when our friend Katie had a brain aneurysm. She was in intensive care for a long time and finally got out and into a step-down unit.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 25, 2014 | Carolyn Kellogg
"Police! Open Up!" is regularly heard at the door of the Chameleon Club, the fictional cabaret in Francine Prose's new novel set in 1930s Paris. Unconventional verging on illicit, the club's revue features sexually ambiguous performers who dance before a predominantly lesbian clientele - in an era when laws existed prohibiting a woman from dressing as a man. And yet the club is tolerated by authorities and celebrated by the city's artists, intellectuals and...
WORLD
January 31, 2010 | By John M. Glionna
Sometimes, in his off hours, Yie Eun-woong does a bit of investigative work. He uses the Internet and other means to track personal data and home addresses of foreign English teachers across South Korea. Then he follows them, often for weeks at a time, staking out their apartments, taking notes on their contacts and habits. He wants to know whether they're doing drugs or molesting children. Yie, a slender 40-year-old who owns a temporary employment agency, says he is only attempting to weed out troublemakers who have no business teaching students in South Korea, or anywhere else.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 24, 2012 | By Anna Gorman, Los Angeles Times
After months searching for work and feeling increasingly discouraged, Natalie Cole caught a break — an offer of a part-time position at a Little Caesars Pizza shop in Compton. The manager scheduled her orientation and told her she had to pass a food safety test. She took the test — and failed. But rather than study and take it again, she shrugged it off. "I guess I am not working for a reason," she said. PHOTOS: A life spent battling poverty Cole isn't a victim of the struggling economy.
SCIENCE
April 18, 2014 | By Karen Kaplan
Victims of bullies suffer the psychological consequences all the way until middle age, with higher levels of depression, anxiety and suicide, new research shows. The immediate ill effects of bullying have been well documented, with experts increasingly seeing it as a form of child abuse . Influential studies from Finland have made the case that people who were bullied as kids continued to suffer as young adults - girls who were bullied grew up to attempt and commit suicide more frequently by the age of 25, for instance, and boys were more likely to develop anxiety disorders.
SPORTS
September 19, 2010 | Jerry Crowe
At his emotional low point, Cliff Frazier never would have imagined that losing a leg might liberate him. Lift his spirits? Not a chance. So, for more than a year, the former UCLA nose guard put off the inevitable, telling doctors that he wasn't about to let his long battle with diabetes render him an amputee. "I thought I'd get well," he said, "but I never did. " It wasn't until a life-threatening infection developed in his bones that he finally relented: his lower right leg had to go. Last winter, it was amputated.
SCIENCE
October 9, 2013 | By Melissa Healy
Having a stroke, or even a transient ischemic attack (a TIA, often called a "mini-stroke") can be a costly watershed in a person's life. Statistically, it deducts years from patients' lives. But it claims another toll too: in quality of life after the stroke has happened. New research tallies the combined cost of those two very different measures, and suggests that current treatments for stroke aren't doing nearly enough to minimize strokes' true cost. The study, published Wednesday in the journal Neurology, is an exercise in health economics that seeks to generate a fuller picture of a disease's cost.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 25, 2013 | By Michael Finnegan and James Rainey, Los Angeles Times
Midway through his election-night victory speech, Eric Garcetti turned toward the cluster of family on the stage behind him and invited his wife to step forward. He thanked her for "making our life work" under the stress of his run for mayor of Los Angeles, saying, "None of this would be possible without Amy Wakeland. " It was a rare moment in the spotlight for Wakeland, a powerful player in Garcetti's political life but one who fiercely guards their family's privacy. With Garcetti's inauguration five weeks away, Wakeland, 43, will soon need to reconcile her fondness for a low profile with the platform that her husband's position will offer to advance causes that she has worked on for years.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 24, 2014 | By Alan Eyerly
Wracked with guilt over murders he commits as a KGB agent, Philip Jennings (Matthew Rhys) falls into a deep, angry depression on “Martial Eagle,” Episode 9 of “The Americans” on FX. His latest killings occur at a camp where Navy SEALs covertly train Contra field commanders intent on overthrowing Nicaragua's Sandinista government. Philip and spy wife Elizabeth (Keri Russell) assassinate the Contras, but innocent lives are lost. “You didn't have a choice,” Elizabeth says, trying to ease her husband's pain.
SPORTS
April 24, 2014 | Eric Sondheimer
One of the greatest gifts for a teenager is when a grandfather is able to live long enough to offer life lessons that can be cherished forever. Grant Hockin, a standout senior pitcher at La Verne Damien, was the recipient of such influential advice from the man he called "grandpa," Harmon Killebrew, a baseball Hall of Famer from the Minnesota Twins who hit 573 home runs in 22 major-league seasons. "He always told me to treat everyone with respect and don't take anything for granted," Hockin said.
BUSINESS
April 23, 2014 | By Roger Vincent
One of the most desirable pieces of real estate in the country - the site of a former department store in Beverly Hills - is on the market again. Unlike other commercial properties across Southern California that have seen major long-stalled developments finally get underway in the last few years, this one has been a struggle. Once home to an upscale Robinsons-May store, the property has seen multiple owners who have so far been unable to bring a condominium complex designed by a famous architect to life.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 21, 2014 | Sandy Banks
Brandon Spencer ought to be considered an object lesson by wannabe gangsters carrying guns. The 21-year-old was sentenced Friday to 40 years to life in prison for shooting into a crowd waiting in line for a Halloween party on the USC campus in 2012. He wounded four people - including his target - but seems to think he ought to get leniency because nobody died. Spencer threw a tantrum in the courtroom when the judge announced his sentence, crying and banging his head on a table, like a 2-year-old sentenced to time-out.
SPORTS
April 21, 2014 | By Gary Klein
A celebration of life gathering for Lonnie White, a former USC football player and Los Angeles Times sportswriter, will be held Saturday at noon in the Founder's Room of USC's Galen Center. White died March 29 . He was 49. White played receiver and also was a special-teams player at USC from 1982 to 1986. His 716 yards in kick-off return yardage was a school season record that stood until 2010. White worked for The Times from 1987 to 2008. He covered the Clippers, Kings, NFL, UCLA football, USC basketball and high school sports and was a general-assignment reporter.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 19, 2014 | By Ryan Menezes
A man convicted of attempted murder for opening fire on a rival gang member on the USC campus sobbed in court Friday as he was sentenced to 40 years to life in prison. At one point, sheriff's deputies had to calm Brandon Spencer as he banged his head on the defense table. He was convicted in February on four counts of attempted murder for the 2012 shooting, the first on the campus in decades. Four people were shot and injured. Nearly 50 friends and family members sat behind Spencer as he tried to compose himself and ask the judge for a second chance.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 8, 2009 | MARY McNAMARA, TELEVISION CRITIC
The great mystery of "Life" is why it isn't a big fat hit. The cop drama/transcendence tale that comes to its seasonal, and perhaps (cue critical wailing and gnashing of teeth) final, end tonight has all the ingredients of a successful show. There's the now-requisite quirky setup: Charlie Crews (Damian Lewis) is a cop wrongfully convicted of a hideous murder and is now back on the force with millions in settlement money, a fresh-fruit habit and an equal need for Zen and revenge.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 3, 2010
18 to Life infobox 8/3/10 '18 to Life' Where: KTLA When: 9 and 9:30 p.m. Tuesday Rating: Not rated
ENTERTAINMENT
April 18, 2014 | By Carolyn Kellogg
Gina Frangello's "A Life in Men" ( Algonquin ) is a novel about a woman with cystic fibrosis who decides to explore the word, making reckless choices with the knowledge that her time is limited. Frangello keeps very busy: She is fiction editor of the Nervous Breakdown, Sunday editor of the Rumpus, editor of Other Voices Books, an imprint of Dzanc, and teaches creative writing. "Frangello writes with epic ferocity," Beth Kephart wrote in the Chicago Tribune review of "A Life  in Men. " "She inhabits many countries brilliantly, many characters seamlessly, and a carousel of points of view.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 18, 2014 | By Ryan Menezes
A man convicted of attempted murder for opening fire on a rival gang member on the USC campus, injuring four, sobbed uncontrollably in court Friday after he was sentenced to 40 years to life in prison. At one point, sheriff's deputies had to restrain Brandon Spencer as he banged his head on the defense table. He was convicted in February of four counts of attempted murder for the 2012 shooting, the first at the campus in decades. While prosecutors argued that Spencer should serve his four terms consecutively, Los Angeles County Superior Court Judge Edmund W. Clarke Jr. ordered Spencer to serve his sentences concurrently, which means he will eventually be eligible for parole.
Los Angeles Times Articles
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