Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsLife
IN THE NEWS

Life

FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
February 15, 2013 | By Hector Tobar, Los Angeles Times
Long before they sat down to write books, Charles Falco and George Rowe sold drugs and used them, raising hell as poor white guys in the desert small towns and exurban fringes of Southern California. They roamed with "tweakers" (meth addicts) and exploited them for cash. But both Falco and Rowe saw the light. Eventually they joined the "good guys" in a crusade against the meanest, cruelest purveyors of darkness in their communities - the biker gangs that collectively share the name Vagos.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
April 27, 2014 | By Patt Morrison
Nowadays, it's the price tag that makes a house famous. The most expensive U.S. home ever sold, a single-family Connecticut house bought by a company, recently went for $120 million. It used to be the owners who made the house famous. Which made Beverly Hills' Pickfair, after the White House, perhaps the most famous house in the country as the home of moviedom's Mary Pickford and Douglas Fairbanks. The next owner of Pickfair rose in the pantheon as well: Jerry Buss, who made the L.A. Lakers one of the winningest franchises in NBA history.
Advertisement
ENTERTAINMENT
October 12, 2013 | By Robert Hilburn
Johnny Cash's life in the 1960s is mostly remembered as a time of glorious achievement - from the landmark prison albums at Folsom and San Quentin to the launch of the ABC-TV series featuring such guests as Bob Dylan and the Doors that led to his becoming a giant figure in popular culture, a symbol to millions, no less, of the best of American social values. But Cash also experienced excruciatingly dark times in the decade, fueled by drugs and guilt over the breakup of his marriage.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 25, 2014 | Carolyn Kellogg
"Police! Open Up!" is regularly heard at the door of the Chameleon Club, the fictional cabaret in Francine Prose's new novel set in 1930s Paris. Unconventional verging on illicit, the club's revue features sexually ambiguous performers who dance before a predominantly lesbian clientele - in an era when laws existed prohibiting a woman from dressing as a man. And yet the club is tolerated by authorities and celebrated by the city's artists, intellectuals and...
WORLD
March 18, 2012 | By Barbara Demick, Los Angeles Times
Like many peasants from the outskirts of Yanan, China, Ren Shouhua was born in a cave and lived there until he got a job in the city and moved into a concrete-block house. His progression made sense as he strove to improve his life. But there's a twist: The 46-year-old Ren plans to move back to a cave when he retires. "It's cool in the summer and warm in the winter. It's quiet and safe," said Ren, a ruddy-faced man with salt-and-pepper hair who moved to the Shaanxi provincial capital, Xian, in his 20s. "When I get old, I'd like to go back to my roots.
OPINION
April 7, 2013 | Susan Silk and Barry Goldman
When Susan had breast cancer, we heard a lot of lame remarks, but our favorite came from one of Susan's colleagues. She wanted, she needed, to visit Susan after the surgery, but Susan didn't feel like having visitors, and she said so. Her colleague's response? "This isn't just about you. " "It's not?" Susan wondered. "My breast cancer is not about me? It's about you?" The same theme came up again when our friend Katie had a brain aneurysm. She was in intensive care for a long time and finally got out and into a step-down unit.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 3, 2002 | BOB POOL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
She arrived by public bus, not by limousine. Still, her return to Paramount Studios could not have been more glorious to June Fairchild. "I'm in heaven," the 1970s starlet said after she stepped from the No. 10 bus and walked onto the Melrose Avenue movie lot. Fairchild was at the studio to sign a merchandising contract that will allow the manufacture of movie souvenirs tied to her role in the 1978 Cheech and Chong cult favorite "Up in Smoke."
SCIENCE
April 18, 2014 | By Karen Kaplan
Victims of bullies suffer the psychological consequences all the way until middle age, with higher levels of depression, anxiety and suicide, new research shows. The immediate ill effects of bullying have been well documented, with experts increasingly seeing it as a form of child abuse . Influential studies from Finland have made the case that people who were bullied as kids continued to suffer as young adults - girls who were bullied grew up to attempt and commit suicide more frequently by the age of 25, for instance, and boys were more likely to develop anxiety disorders.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 19, 2014 | By Nardine Saad
Shayne Lamas and husband Nik Richie have named the son the reality star miscarried earlier this month.  "The Bachelor" alum, 28, who was rushed to the hospital Feb. 9 after collapsing in her Orange County home, suffered a pregnancy complication that resulted in the miscarriage of the couple's 20-week old son. Lamas underwent an emergency hysterectomy -- the complete removal of the uterus -- in order to stop internal bleeding, TMZ ...
SCIENCE
October 9, 2013 | By Melissa Healy
Having a stroke, or even a transient ischemic attack (a TIA, often called a "mini-stroke") can be a costly watershed in a person's life. Statistically, it deducts years from patients' lives. But it claims another toll too: in quality of life after the stroke has happened. New research tallies the combined cost of those two very different measures, and suggests that current treatments for stroke aren't doing nearly enough to minimize strokes' true cost. The study, published Wednesday in the journal Neurology, is an exercise in health economics that seeks to generate a fuller picture of a disease's cost.
SPORTS
April 24, 2014 | Eric Sondheimer
One of the greatest gifts for a teenager is when a grandfather is able to live long enough to offer life lessons that can be cherished forever. Grant Hockin, a standout senior pitcher at La Verne Damien, was the recipient of such influential advice from the man he called "grandpa," Harmon Killebrew, a baseball Hall of Famer from the Minnesota Twins who hit 573 home runs in 22 major-league seasons. "He always told me to treat everyone with respect and don't take anything for granted," Hockin said.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 24, 2014 | By Alan Eyerly
Wracked with guilt over murders he commits as a KGB agent, Philip Jennings (Matthew Rhys) falls into a deep, angry depression on “Martial Eagle,” Episode 9 of “The Americans” on FX. His latest killings occur at a camp where Navy SEALs covertly train Contra field commanders intent on overthrowing Nicaragua's Sandinista government. Philip and spy wife Elizabeth (Keri Russell) assassinate the Contras, but innocent lives are lost. “You didn't have a choice,” Elizabeth says, trying to ease her husband's pain.
BUSINESS
April 23, 2014 | By Roger Vincent
One of the most desirable pieces of real estate in the country - the site of a former department store in Beverly Hills - is on the market again. Unlike other commercial properties across Southern California that have seen major long-stalled developments finally get underway in the last few years, this one has been a struggle. Once home to an upscale Robinsons-May store, the property has seen multiple owners who have so far been unable to bring a condominium complex designed by a famous architect to life.
SPORTS
April 21, 2014 | By Gary Klein
A celebration of life gathering for Lonnie White, a former USC football player and Los Angeles Times sportswriter, will be held Saturday at noon in the Founder's Room of USC's Galen Center. White died March 29 . He was 49. White played receiver and also was a special-teams player at USC from 1982 to 1986. His 716 yards in kick-off return yardage was a school season record that stood until 2010. White worked for The Times from 1987 to 2008. He covered the Clippers, Kings, NFL, UCLA football, USC basketball and high school sports and was a general-assignment reporter.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 21, 2014 | Sandy Banks
Brandon Spencer ought to be considered an object lesson by wannabe gangsters carrying guns. The 21-year-old was sentenced Friday to 40 years to life in prison for shooting into a crowd waiting in line for a Halloween party on the USC campus in 2012. He wounded four people - including his target - but seems to think he ought to get leniency because nobody died. Spencer threw a tantrum in the courtroom when the judge announced his sentence, crying and banging his head on a table, like a 2-year-old sentenced to time-out.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 19, 2014 | By Ryan Menezes
A man convicted of attempted murder for opening fire on a rival gang member on the USC campus sobbed in court Friday as he was sentenced to 40 years to life in prison. At one point, sheriff's deputies had to calm Brandon Spencer as he banged his head on the defense table. He was convicted in February on four counts of attempted murder for the 2012 shooting, the first on the campus in decades. Four people were shot and injured. Nearly 50 friends and family members sat behind Spencer as he tried to compose himself and ask the judge for a second chance.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 25, 2013 | By Michael Finnegan and James Rainey, Los Angeles Times
Midway through his election-night victory speech, Eric Garcetti turned toward the cluster of family on the stage behind him and invited his wife to step forward. He thanked her for "making our life work" under the stress of his run for mayor of Los Angeles, saying, "None of this would be possible without Amy Wakeland. " It was a rare moment in the spotlight for Wakeland, a powerful player in Garcetti's political life but one who fiercely guards their family's privacy. With Garcetti's inauguration five weeks away, Wakeland, 43, will soon need to reconcile her fondness for a low profile with the platform that her husband's position will offer to advance causes that she has worked on for years.
OPINION
April 4, 2012 | By Blaine Harden
Joining my 9-year-old daughter and a sizable slice of the American population, I queued up last week to watch"The Hunger Games. "My daughter had just read the book and was giddy with excitement. Reviewers had reassured me that scenes in the film showing children fighting each other to the death on orders of a totalitarian state had been carefully edited. Still, the movie turned my stomach - and not because of what I saw on the screen. What flashed through my mind were images of North Korea.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 18, 2014 | By Ryan Menezes
A man convicted of attempted murder for opening fire on a rival gang member on the USC campus, injuring four, sobbed uncontrollably in court Friday after he was sentenced to 40 years to life in prison. At one point, sheriff's deputies had to restrain Brandon Spencer as he banged his head on the defense table. He was convicted in February of four counts of attempted murder for the 2012 shooting, the first at the campus in decades. While prosecutors argued that Spencer should serve his four terms consecutively, Los Angeles County Superior Court Judge Edmund W. Clarke Jr. ordered Spencer to serve his sentences concurrently, which means he will eventually be eligible for parole.
HEALTH
April 18, 2014 | By Mary MacVean
I wash 1-quart plastic bags to reuse them. And every time, I wonder if I'm doing the right thing. Am I saving plastic? Wasting water? Just being cheap? Such questions can take up a lot of brain space these days and create anxiety in surplus as we contemplate our consumption of the Earth's resources. There's potential for dozens of quandaries every day: If I drive nine miles to my favorite farmers market, is that OK? Or must I go to the closer one I don't like as well? Paper or plastic bags?
Los Angeles Times Articles
|