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June 22, 1986 | Norman Corwin, Corwin, writer and director, worked with Murrow in London. His latest book is "Trivializing America." and
In the 21 years since Edward R. Murrow's ashes were scattered over the glen of his farm in Pawling, N.Y., two massive biographies have been written. The latest, by Ann M. Sperber, exceeds the first by nearly 300 pages. Copious as both are, they will probably not be the last accounts of Murrow's life, since even this early, it has become clear that he is a man for the ages. There has not been a journalist of his size before or since, and it may be a long while before we see his likes again.
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ENTERTAINMENT
August 9, 2013 | By David L. Ulin, Los Angeles Times Book Critic
Early in Jeff Guinn's "Manson: The Life and Times of Charles Manson," the first full biography of the infamous mass killer, there's a moment of unexpected and discomforting empathy. It's 1939, and Manson - 5 years old, living with relatives in West Virginia while his mother is in state prison for armed robbery - has embarrassed himself by crying in a first-grade class. To toughen him up, his uncle takes one of his daughter's dresses and orders the boy to wear it to school. "Maybe his mother and Uncle Luther were bad influences," Guinn writes, "but Charlie could benefit from Uncle Bill's intercession.
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ENTERTAINMENT
August 1, 2009 | David Davis, Davis is a contributing writer at Los Angeles magazine.
How fast could pitcher Leroy "Satchel" Paige hurl a baseball? According to catcher Biz Mackey, a Paige contemporary, Satchel's fastball "tends to disappear. Yes, disappear. I've heard about Satchel throwing pitches that wasn't hit but that never showed up in the catcher's mitt nevertheless. They say the catcher, the umpire and bat boys looked all over for that ball, but it was gone. Now how do you account for that?"
ENTERTAINMENT
June 2, 2013 | By David L. Ulin, Los Angeles Times Book Critic
Summer is my favorite season - always has been. Partly, it's the light: slow and thick, like a glaze of honey spread across the world. Partly, it's the heat, which I feel in my joints, making me imagine I was loose-limbed again. But more than anything, it's the feeling of space, of the moment expanding, the faith that, during these three months, I might do anything. That's an adolescent's faith, to be sure, but it has lingered, as if there might be (to borrow a phrase from a favorite episode of "The Twilight Zone")
ENTERTAINMENT
August 9, 2013 | By David L. Ulin, Los Angeles Times Book Critic
Early in Jeff Guinn's "Manson: The Life and Times of Charles Manson," the first full biography of the infamous mass killer, there's a moment of unexpected and discomforting empathy. It's 1939, and Manson - 5 years old, living with relatives in West Virginia while his mother is in state prison for armed robbery - has embarrassed himself by crying in a first-grade class. To toughen him up, his uncle takes one of his daughter's dresses and orders the boy to wear it to school. "Maybe his mother and Uncle Luther were bad influences," Guinn writes, "but Charlie could benefit from Uncle Bill's intercession.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 18, 1991 | BETH KLEID, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
'Life' Goes On: "My Life and Times," starring Tom Irwin as an 85-year-old in 2035 who recalls the moments that made up his life and times, will premiere April 24 at 9:30 p.m. on ABC. "My Life and Times," replaces "Anything but Love," which will conclude its run April 17. ABC said "Anything but Love" remains under consideration for a spot on its fall schedule.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 5, 1985
Your newspaper took three days to describe the life and times of Hugh Hefner. I could do the same, using only one word--shallow. SUSAN LILLYWHITE Placentia
NEWS
June 23, 1991
It is regrettable that ABC canceled the series "My Life and Times" after airing just one episode. The six episodes that were finally aired showed that the series had great thought and effort behind it. It was pleasantly introspective and contemplative. It should have been given time to build an audience, poor ratings or not. Gary A. Lynch, Los Angeles
SPORTS
July 13, 1985
Why are senior softball players (55 and older) in the San Fernando Valley not given any attention? Seems as though the people who can really benefit from some recognition are handled by The Times like most of society. Don't you have anyone of an age or of a sense to realize what some coverage by you people could do for the life and times of this age group? I find that hard to believe. Would like your opinion--if you have time for us. WALTER L. SILVER Encino
ENTERTAINMENT
February 15, 1987
How many times have I skimmed 8-page articles, groaning at the minute detail with which Calendar went into the life and times of Burt Reynolds, Sylvester Stallone or the complete history of L.A. radio? And the one time when I was actually looking foward to a mega-article (I even got up early to read it), I was given a paltry 1 1/2 pages. I'm referring, of course, to the much-advertised scoop on that most deserving subject, Woody Allen ("The Other Sides of Woody," by Charles Champlin, Feb. 8)
ENTERTAINMENT
June 2, 2013
Buck A Memoir M.K. Asante Spiegel & Grau, $25 A young filmmaker, academic and author of "It's Bigger Than Hip Hop," Asante traces his self-education as he makes his way from Zimbabwe to the streets of North Philadelphia and emerges through the power of language. (August) A Matter of Life Jeffrey Brown Top Shelf, $14.95 The author of the Star Wars parenting parody "Darth Vader and Son" presents an autobiographical tale of fatherhood in graphic novel form, focusing on Brown's relationships with his minister father and young son. (July)
OPINION
October 10, 2012 | Patt Morrison
David Dreier was 26, still living in a dorm at Claremont McKenna College and working as a college administrator, when he ran for Congress the first time, in 1978. He lost then but never thereafter. Sixteen times, Dreier was elected to the House of Representatives from a San Gabriel Valley/San Bernardino County district. He became the youngest-ever chairman of the Rules Committee, mastering the machinery of the House. But in February, he announced he would not seek reelection. He leaves behind a sharply redrawn district, and a Congress he insists is not so awfully different from the one he entered more than half his life ago. You went to Washington in the "Ronald Reagan Class of 1980.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 4, 2011 | By Adam Tschorn, Los Angeles Times
Ethan Allen His Life and Times Willard Sterne Randall W.W. Norton: 619 pp., $35 As any student of Vermont history can tell you - and the recent flood devastation in that state underscores all too well - water has played a huge role in shaping what would become the 14th state to join the Union. The Connecticut River forms Vermont's eastern border with New Hampshire, and Lake Champlain forms the majority of the state's western border with New York. But the boundary lines of current-day Vermont were hardly the result of riparian randomness: The future state was carved out of competing colonial claims asserted by New York and New Hampshire, and if there were a single individual who was as much a force of nature as the waters themselves at shaping the Green Mountain State, most historians would agree it was Ethan Allen.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 24, 2011 | By Nate Jackson, Los Angeles Times
The image of a raging fire is a constant in the world of Lee "Scratch" Perry. Even at age 75, the Jamaican originator of the reverb-laden sounds of dub music still burns a little bit out of control. In a career spanning 40 years and counting, his enduring rude boy attitude and sometimes chaotic methods have only added to his reputation as one of the most important ? if least known ? creative forces in Jamaican music. The former producer for Bob Marley and the Wailers, the Heptones, the Congos and many other seminal figures in reggae music, and collaborator with pop stars including the Clash and Paul McCartney, Perry's enigmatic life and career are now the subject of a recently released film, "The Upsetter: The Life and Music of Lee Scratch Perry.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 5, 2011
LEE K. HARRINGTON Headed L.A. Economic Development Corp. Lee K. Harrington, 64, a businessman who was executive director of the Southern California Leadership Council and the former head of the Los Angeles Economic Development Corp., died Friday near his Hollister Ranch home while surfing off the coast of Santa Barbara County, according to the Santa Barbara County coroner. Harrington was surfing with friends at St. Augustine Beach, west of Santa Barbara, when one of them noticed he was unconscious on his surfboard, KSBY-TV in Santa Barbara reported.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 2, 2011 | By Wendy Smith, Special to the Los Angeles Times
American Rose: A Nation Laid Bare: The Life and Times of Gypsy Rose Lee Karen Abbott Random House: 426 pp., $26 Gypsy Rose Lee became the most famous stripper in America with a stylish routine notable less for the striptease than for her witty repartee while she peeled. Her fans included H.L. Mencken; her wisecracks made Walter Winchell's column, though I doubt Winchell printed the one that Karen Abbott takes as an epigraph for the first chapter in her seething biography: "Mother says I'm the most beautiful naked ass ?
ENTERTAINMENT
September 19, 1997 | F. KATHLEEN FOLEY
The one-man show "Ali: The Life and Times of Muhammad Ali" at the Hudson Backstage chronicles the career of arguably the greatest--and certainly the most flamboyant--heavyweight boxing champion. Commencing in 1989, the action opens on a slower, struggling Ali (David Roberson), already in the throes of Parkinson's disease, ostensibly addressing an audience on a college lecture tour--a neat expositional device on the part of co-writers Geoffrey C. Ewing and Graydon Royce.
NEWS
July 19, 1985 | Associated Press
A Stanford University professor accused of decorating his home with thousands of priceless inventions and documents from the collection of inventor Thomas A. Edison is under indictment on charges of concealing stolen property, federal authorities announced Thursday. Among the items confiscated from the one-story home of Phillip Burns Petersen in Redwood City, Calif.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 15, 2010 | By Liz Brown, Special to the Los Angeles Times
In their time, the daughters of the second Baron Redesdale, better known as the Mitford sisters, were an industry. Their trade, for the most part, was their mere existence ? swanning about British society, leaving scandal and newsprint in their wake. Nancy wrote deliciously acidic novels and gossipy history. (Evelyn Waugh dedicated "The Loved One" to her.) Diana and Unity were avowed fascists. Adolf Hitler was a witness at Diana's wedding to Oswald Mosely, and Unity was so besotted with the F├╝hrer and chagrined when Britain declared war on Germany that she tried to kill herself.
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